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  1. #4076
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    Jan 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hopeless Sinner View Post
    Is that an FOB price or delivered?
    Delivered. It’s only a few bucks is cheaper than picking it up at HD.....


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  2. #4077
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hopeless Sinner View Post
    If a parts changer comes out once a service call for a dishwasher and a second time to actually replace the part you're at $400. Hopefully it was the right part and your wife does the dishes. LOL

    Buy a new one installed for $450 and you only have 1 appointment to keep and you'll have a NEW working DW for sure.
    I just fixed our dishwasher myself.

  3. #4078
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    Mar 2008
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    northern BC
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    I just fixed our dishwasher myself.
    I did a lot of fairly intricate shit using spring hooks & a hemostat for not a lot of pay, the thing was that if i fucked it up nobody died or walked funny for the rest of their life, maybe I just go back to parts and order the assembly come ... back tomorrow

    If you been operating on people you should have the chops to fix yer own appliances with a few tools and a good sharp google
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  4. #4079
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    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    I did a lot of fairly intricate shit using spring hooks & a hemostat for not a lot of pay, the thing was that if i fucked it up nobody died or walked funny for the rest of their life, maybe I just go back to parts and order the assembly come ... back tomorrow

    If you been operating on people you should have the chops to fix yer own appliances with a few tools and a good sharp google
    It wasn't much of a repair--the thing conked out when the disposal was running.. Somehow that put too much water in the pan under the works. The repair involved trying to remember how to get the panel off--I installed it maybe 15 years ago--and the manual wasn't much help. Sponging out the water. Putting the panel on--the hardest part because whenever I take something apart I can never remember what went where and in what order. Never had that happen with a patient, and if I did there are books you can check. I can see replacing a part on a dishwasher would be tough because of where all the parts are--in the bottom. Not as bad as a disposal though.

    What's a spring hook for?

  5. #4080
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    Mar 2008
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    it wasn't much of a repair cuz there isnt really much TOO repair, these are simple machines

    a spring hook is for hooking springs to whatever they need to be hooked to, they came in 3 sizes the middle size was the most useful and had a pusher end

    its different than when they are paying you huge coin to cut people open and put all the parts back right cuz if you fuck up a DW nobody dies
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  6. #4081
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    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    it wasn't much of a repair cuz there isnt really much TOO repair, these are simple machines

    a spring hook is for hooking springs to whatever they need to be hooked to, they came in 3 sizes the middle size was the most useful and had a pusher end

    its different than when they are paying you huge coin to cut people open and put all the parts back right cuz if you fuck up a DW nobody dies
    If I fuck up a DW my wife will kill me. So you're wrong.

  7. #4082
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    Oct 2010
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    846
    I’m thinking about building a small 16’x16’ floating deck, I’ve enjoyed Trex before, and it’s actually cheaper than cedar right now.

    Has Trex gone up exponentially too?

  8. #4083
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    Sep 2006
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    Thought I asked about this a day or two ago but don’t see it. Has anyone used these mats for underneath brick pavers? Is it to spread the load of a foot step to give more stability? Area to be pavered is a small narrow side sitting area. Low traffic, low visibility. Not wanting to excavate dirt, or bring in a ton of crusher and sand, since this person has no gate on their back yard.
    Level the dirt, Pack the dirt, lay crusher base, lay sand, mats on top of that, then pavers? Mats worth the fairly high relative cost?

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    I suppose I might be able to carry a mechanical tamper through the person 32” door but probably wouldn’t be fun. Flip side is 8”x8” hand tampers don’t look very effective. I have one of those 5’ digging pry bars with the little 3” circle tamper on one side. Thinking that might compact more effectively, even if not making a flat footprint. I don’t have one of the 8” squares and don’t really want to buy one for this one little gig.


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  9. #4084
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    we've multiple brick patios laying sand on dirt, brick on sand. period. Disclaimer--Sacramento notorious for it's dense clay soil. So in effect brick on sand on brick. Very stable without crushed rock or tamping.

  10. #4085
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    Jun 2020
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    Rideski I think that round one isn't gonna work very well at all. If you're not actually punching little holes in the ground I'd be surprised, and even if it works it'll take forever. Just get a regular tamper, it's not amazing but it'll work fine and they're pretty cheap: https://smile.amazon.com/Companies-I...46&sr=8-2&th=1

  11. #4086
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    May 2009
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    inpdx
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rideski View Post
    Thought I asked about this a day or two ago but don’t see it. Has anyone used these mats for underneath brick pavers? Is it to spread the load of a foot step to give more stability? Area to be pavered is a small narrow side sitting area. Low traffic, low visibility. Not wanting to excavate dirt, or bring in a ton of crusher and sand, since this person has no gate on their back yard.
    Level the dirt, Pack the dirt, lay crusher base, lay sand, mats on top of that, then pavers? Mats worth the fairly high relative cost?

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	91F2507F-4BFF-435D-B1D1-6E7AE9CC6C5C.png 
Views:	102 
Size:	506.2 KB 
ID:	377506


    I suppose I might be able to carry a mechanical tamper through the person 32” door but probably wouldn’t be fun. Flip side is 8”x8” hand tampers don’t look very effective. I have one of those 5’ digging pry bars with the little 3” circle tamper on one side. Thinking that might compact more effectively, even if not making a flat footprint. I don’t have one of the 8” squares and don’t really want to buy one for this one little gig.


    Click image for larger version. 

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    It looks like it’s meant to REPLACE the sand set layer by creating a network membrane matrix that stabilizes the subgrade to minimize any settlement. Never used them tho…I suspect they are only as good as the base prep…so results may vary. Not a panacea.

    8x8 tampers work. Sure, not as effectively as a powered compactor, but hey…very portable and works in tight corners/small spaces

  12. #4087
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    Sep 2006
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    From my brief homework, I think you skip the 4 inches of crusher. Then put down sand to scree flat, mats on top. Like doc we have clay soil, and this area will be low traffic.

    I guess I could get the 8x8, just seems it would be hard to get enough pressure to do much, but a couple positive votes is reassuring. The 3”circle might leave divots, but it would make compaction. Would take a while for sure. Maybe just on the edges.

  13. #4088
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    inpdx
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    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    Yeah, the sand layer is purely to micro-adjust flatness/level

  14. #4089
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    Aug 2010
    Posts
    193
    Rent a jumping jack. Will get through the narrow door easily. And yeah, those hand tampers work better than you'd expect.

  15. #4090
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rideski View Post
    Thought I asked about this a day or two ago but don’t see it. Has anyone used these mats for underneath brick pavers? Is it to spread the load of a foot step to give more stability? Area to be pavered is a small narrow side sitting area. Low traffic, low visibility. Not wanting to excavate dirt, or bring in a ton of crusher and sand, since this person has no gate on their back yard.
    Level the dirt, Pack the dirt, lay crusher base, lay sand, mats on top of that, then pavers? Mats worth the fairly high relative cost?

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	91F2507F-4BFF-435D-B1D1-6E7AE9CC6C5C.png 
Views:	102 
Size:	506.2 KB 
ID:	377506


    I suppose I might be able to carry a mechanical tamper through the person 32” door but probably wouldn’t be fun. Flip side is 8”x8” hand tampers don’t look very effective. I have one of those 5’ digging pry bars with the little 3” circle tamper on one side. Thinking that might compact more effectively, even if not making a flat footprint. I don’t have one of the 8” squares and don’t really want to buy one for this one little gig.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	8D0EE39B-FB47-4CE4-B9F4-F157067B337B.png 
Views:	99 
Size:	232.0 KB 
ID:	377507
    The mats look like a solution in search of a problem. Base rock, sand, pavers has literally worked since the beginning of civilization…. As others have said, I imagine your gonna have to get the sub grade perfect for the mat to work right…. It seems like there is more margin for error with a traditional system.

    Hand tampers work well enough for small SF. They are good to have around to house for smashing down the garbage in the bin to make more room… you can always put a weight from a barbell on the tamper for some added affect….




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  16. #4091
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    Sep 2006
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    5,658
    Hmmm ok I’ll check that out size / cost of jumping jack. Would rather spend $100 on that vs 2 hours of pounding sand. Heh. Considered taking fence boards off but don’t want to break them since they’d prolly cost $30 a slat right now.

    What about polymeric sand for the joints filling when there’s no ability to blow it away and no hose? I could hand spray water on I suppose. Or maybe hook a waterbed attachment to a sink.
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  17. #4092
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    Apr 2004
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    cordova,AK
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    unless you brought in some fill to get to that grade i would not get a jumping jack. It looks like to me all you need is to hose it down a little and hit it with the hand compactor. Jumping jack on that small area will create more work.
    off your knees Louie

  18. #4093
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    Sep 2006
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    Noted. Not wanting to bring anything more than necessary in because of access. Was going to do bagged crusher and bagged sand. Not trying to get up to grade. Going to leave a river rock border on fence side for drainage. The sidewalk under the fence is higher grade than her concrete slab just out of view on the close side point of view.

  19. #4094
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    Aug 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by BFD View Post
    unless you brought in some fill to get to that grade i would not get a jumping jack. It looks like to me all you need is to hose it down a little and hit it with the hand compactor. Jumping jack on that small area will create more work.
    To each their own but I would absolutely use a powered compactor of some sort for an area that size. That is of course, if you want to have a smooth patio surface over the long term. Especially considering this looks like a hired job.

  20. #4095
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    Dust pan for blowing/brushing sand
    Then just sprinkle it in a planter

  21. #4096
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    Apr 2004
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    cordova,AK
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    I would of recommended a plate compactor. However due to the narrow work area it will be somewhat difficult to use. Than he has the time of picking it up and returning it plus the rental fee. I think he can do the job as well and faster by hand.
    off your knees Louie

  22. #4097
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    Aug 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by BFD View Post
    I would of recommended a plate compactor. However due to the narrow work area it will be somewhat difficult to use. Than he has the time of picking it up and returning it plus the rental fee. I think he can do the job as well and faster by hand.
    Plate compactor is clearly the answer, just throwing out a lighter weight option if he needs it. I've just never seen a paver patio look good that has been done by hand.

  23. #4098
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    Sep 2006
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    It is a hired gig for a person I don’t know. That said, she was enthusiastic to pay me a few hundred knowing I would be learning on her project versus the several thousand the landscape company wanted. I showed her the undulations in the next door neighbors pad and she was fine with that. It’s a screwy setup for a patio area but not too surprising given the max density boxes they are building these days. I’ll look at the cost of a rental and give her the option. Probably need a hand tamper for edges anyway. The more I think about it the more I’m liking the idea of getting a garden hose out there from a sink faucet.

  24. #4099
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    Jan 2008
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    On the subject of garden hoses--digging a bunch of 18in deep holes for lengths of conduit to hold removeable iron snow poles. Mixture of dirt and small rocks with large rocks thrown in. As the hydraulic miners learned during the California Gold Rush--water digs a lot better than a shovel, especially when it comes to the large rocks.

  25. #4100
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    Sep 2018
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    Sand - don’t use regular sand under your bricks. It’s like ball bearings and loves to settle and move. Use sand specifically for pavers. It’s jagged and holds together.

    This is pretty important.


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