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  1. #1501
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    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    I also like to add a towel heater as the bathroom heat option.
    I have a 110v Runtal in one bathroom. It takes hours to heat up and is not efficient at all. It's nice though, I was sick last weekend and with the floor and radiator both on I could get well over 100 degrees with moist heat in there. That's how you cure a cold..

  2. #1502
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flounder View Post
    Ended up at about $12 due to the complex design and the need to route out a lot of bends. Our existing framing had a lot of deviation that caused problems as well. Took some shimming to keep the floor level.

    That's great news. I don't want expensive flooring. I would prefer a non slip tile that works well as a conductor. $30~ a ft install with boiler and tile and I'm in. $60k dollar luxury upgrade for 2k sq ft. house.

  3. #1503
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    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    I also like to add a towel heater as the bathroom heat option.
    now that i see that in print, i gotta retract...don't use the towel bar as primary heat, just as a nice-to-have [poorly stated by me up above] once you have radiant available to you in the house

    Quote Originally Posted by 4matic View Post
    I have a 110v Runtal in one bathroom. It takes hours to heat up and is not efficient at all. It's nice though, I was sick last weekend and with the floor and radiator both on I could get well over 100 degrees with moist heat in there. That's how you cure a cold..
    having the system set to your wake up and bedtime routine def makes it nice (100 is pretty steamy tho)

  4. #1504
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    Saw a house recently that had on-demand hot water and in-floor radiant heat, both ran on LPG. Is the on demand hot water typically part of the in-floor system? I don't know anything about either of those. Efficient with LPG? As in, small (1500 sq ft) house with cold winters, how long would a 500 gallon LPG tank last? Also, I assume it takes a while to change the heat level in the home more than a few degrees. So you probably don't turn the heat down while you go to work during the day, but how long would it take to bring the house up 10+ degrees after you've been away for a couple of weeks? I realize there are probably a bunch of subjective factors, but I'm curious in generalities.

  5. #1505
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    Saw a house recently that had on-demand hot water and in-floor radiant heat, both ran on LPG. Is the on demand hot water typically part of the in-floor system? I don't know anything about either of those. Efficient with LPG? As in, small (1500 sq ft) house with cold winters, how long would a 500 gallon LPG tank last? Also, I assume it takes a while to change the heat level in the home more than a few degrees. So you probably don't turn the heat down while you go to work during the day, but how long would it take to bring the house up 10+ degrees after you've been away for a couple of weeks? I realize there are probably a bunch of subjective factors, but I'm curious in generalities.
    you can get a boiler that does both domestic & heating hot water
    it has two loops that run independently

    i'm not up on LPG vs gas for efficiency. We're on natural gas here and it is very efficient.

    half a day to go from cold house to reasonable is my guess...not sure how pricy that would be if you're doing that every other week through a winter tho

  6. #1506
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    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    you can get a boiler that does both domestic & heating hot water
    it has two loops that run independently

    i'm not up on LPG vs gas for efficiency. We're on natural gas here and it is very efficient.
    We have this in a house at 9200 feet of elevation, but it runs off propane.

    In floor radiant in the concrete basement, radiators all around upper floors. Works well with propane bills less than $150 in the winter for a pretty big house with admittedly monster insulation.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
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  7. #1507
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    Yeah the radiant is a closed loop whereas the hot water is open, so it would be parallel loops at least, if not competely separate systems. Without spending too much time thinking about it it seems to me that a traditional hot water tank with a single boiler would be a better fit with a radiant system but I'm sure there's plenty of literature out there if you're interested in pursuing it.

  8. #1508
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    Our boiler feeds into a loop in the hw tank. That loop heats the HW and then exits the hw tank to be distributed among the 8 different zone valves.
    Last edited by Buster Highmen; 01-10-2020 at 11:03 AM.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
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  9. #1509
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    Saw a house recently that had on-demand hot water and in-floor radiant heat, both ran on LPG. Is the on demand hot water typically part of the in-floor system? I don't know anything about either of those. Efficient with LPG? As in, small (1500 sq ft) house with cold winters, how long would a 500 gallon LPG tank last? Also, I assume it takes a while to change the heat level in the home more than a few degrees. So you probably don't turn the heat down while you go to work during the day, but how long would it take to bring the house up 10+ degrees after you've been away for a couple of weeks? I realize there are probably a bunch of subjective factors, but I'm curious in generalities.
    This is basically my system and I run a LPG combi-boiler. Both sides of the system are tankless. Hot water is priority so it shuts down the radiant in floors when you take a shower. Being radiant in floor though, 15 minutes here and there shouldn't be a bother even with minimal thermal mass like mine. My system is kinda home brew, step above DIY and consists of tubing stapled under floor, with 2" rigid foam and some reflective foil beneath the piping, with another 6" of batts beneath that. Slate tiles for actual flooring which is the only thermal mass. The rest of the house is a SIP system with r30 walls and R50 roof, so pretty solid elsewhere. The crawlspace stays at about 50 no matter what winter or summer so the system seems to not be wasteful down there. I also have good solar gain, which really helps.

    I have a 1320 sq ft place and a 500 gallon tank, (really 400 useable) lasts anywhere from 12-14 months, notably higher usage in the winter. I also have a large temp rise of 100+ for the radiant side off my well which spits out at 38 degrees in the winter. More like 70 degree rise on the DHW side of things. Make sure to take this into account when sizing your combi.

    My system will bring the house from 55 or so to 68-70 in about 6-8 hours when I come back from a trip. It probably takes 5 hours to get the first couple degrees, then the rest comes in the last hour. When I am not traveling I set it at 68 in the fall and don't touch it, as it is slow to react. I use my wood stove if I need things to ramp up quicker.

    This is all in Idaho and it was -8 this morning, so it gets really cold. I have been really impressed with the overall efficiency of my house and 800 bucks a year in propane for all of it, given my climate, is pretty awesome. My house isn't big, but I have the cheapest heat bills in my hood based on my conversations.
    Live Free or Die

  10. #1510
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    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    having the system set to your wake up and bedtime routine def makes it nice (100 is pretty steamy tho)
    If I lived in a cooler climate for sure. For me, the only time I turn it on is when I want spa heat and then I might leave it on for a couple days. I have solar panels to offset my gluttony.

    Edit: Towels take a long time to heat on a towel radiator. If you really want heated towels a hot box would be much better and far more efficient. It would be pretty easy to build a small one in I'd think.

  11. #1511
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    My cheap Carrier furnace in the garage vibrates and is loud. I knew that when I bought it. What are the best choices for forced air furnace? Variable fan for quiet? Insulated panels? Outdoor heat pump?

  12. #1512
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdironRider View Post
    This is basically my system and I run a LPG combi-boiler. Both sides of the system are tankless. Hot water is priority so it shuts down the radiant in floors when you take a shower. Being radiant in floor though, 15 minutes here and there shouldn't be a bother even with minimal thermal mass like mine. My system is kinda home brew, step above DIY and consists of tubing stapled under floor, with 2" rigid foam and some reflective foil beneath the piping, with another 6" of batts beneath that. Slate tiles for actual flooring which is the only thermal mass. The rest of the house is a SIP system with r30 walls and R50 roof, so pretty solid elsewhere. The crawlspace stays at about 50 no matter what winter or summer so the system seems to not be wasteful down there. I also have good solar gain, which really helps.

    I have a 1320 sq ft place and a 500 gallon tank, (really 400 useable) lasts anywhere from 12-14 months, notably higher usage in the winter. I also have a large temp rise of 100+ for the radiant side off my well which spits out at 38 degrees in the winter. More like 70 degree rise on the DHW side of things. Make sure to take this into account when sizing your combi.

    My system will bring the house from 55 or so to 68-70 in about 6-8 hours when I come back from a trip. It probably takes 5 hours to get the first couple degrees, then the rest comes in the last hour. When I am not traveling I set it at 68 in the fall and don't touch it, as it is slow to react. I use my wood stove if I need things to ramp up quicker.

    This is all in Idaho and it was -8 this morning, so it gets really cold. I have been really impressed with the overall efficiency of my house and 800 bucks a year in propane for all of it, given my climate, is pretty awesome. My house isn't big, but I have the cheapest heat bills in my hood based on my conversations.
    This is super helpful as I think we are talking similar set-ups. I'm impressed that the LPG lasts that long.

    About the wood stove: do you find that when heating with it the in-floor doesn't kick on at all? Or is the thermostat located somewhere not too effected by the stoves heat? Any estimate on how many cords you burn a winter?

  13. #1513
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    Who is the ... guy?

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  14. #1514
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4matic View Post
    My cheap Carrier furnace in the garage vibrates and is loud. I knew that when I bought it. What are the best choices for forced air furnace? Variable fan for quiet? Insulated panels? Outdoor heat pump?
    Cheap and Carrier are not usually associated with each other like this.
    “The best argument in favour of a 90% tax rate on the rich is a five-minute chat with the average rich person.”

    - Winston Churchill, paraphrased.

  15. #1515
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    I just fill as needed and own my own tank. I highly recommend that also as I've noticed some real variability in pricing between outfits here. A 500 gallon tank cost me a grand delivered to my house. I made it up in like two fills being able to shop around. I do wish I had it buried though.

    When I run the wood stove the radiant doesn't kick on at all. With my house being pretty well insulated elsewhere it maybe drops a degree or two in the couple hours before the radiant can catch up after the fire goes out, then holds steady right at 68. I go through about a cord each winter, and its pure luxury, walking around in my boxers when its -10 and such.
    Live Free or Die

  16. #1516
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    Mar 2006
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    On the subject of heating.....is there a good way to figure out fireplace BTUs for a given space? Everything I read online calculates based on room size (cubic sqft)....however I have an open concept (living room, kitchen, sunroom all in one space) and high ceiling and no doors to prevent heat from flowing out to hallway and up the stairs.

    I am at the point of just throwing up my arms and treating the fireplace as a decorative item and going with whatever fits the space (36-37" width max) and saying I am not gonna get the BTUs to do much of anything useful.

  17. #1517
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdironRider View Post
    I just fill as needed and own my own tank. I highly recommend that also as I've noticed some real variability in pricing between outfits here. A 500 gallon tank cost me a grand delivered to my house. I made it up in like two fills being able to shop around. I do wish I had it buried though.

    When I run the wood stove the radiant doesn't kick on at all. With my house being pretty well insulated elsewhere it maybe drops a degree or two in the couple hours before the radiant can catch up after the fire goes out, then holds steady right at 68. I go through about a cord each winter, and its pure luxury, walking around in my boxers when its -10 and such.
    $800ish a year to heat while burning less than a cord of wood is a nice set up. I agree on the buried/owned tank, that would be ideal.

  18. #1518
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nobody Famous View Post
    Cheap and Carrier are not usually associated with each other like this.
    it's noisier than the 20 year old it replaced. The inducer fan is already vibrating. It's only an 80 seer I think.

    Looks like this piece of junk.
    https://iwae.com/shop/70k-btu-80-afu...yABEgLAEvD_BwE

  19. #1519
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    Quote Originally Posted by sirbumpsalot View Post
    On the subject of heating.....is there a good way to figure out fireplace BTUs for a given space? Everything I read online calculates based on room size (cubic sqft)....however I have an open concept (living room, kitchen, sunroom all in one space) and high ceiling and no doors to prevent heat from flowing out to hallway and up the stairs.

    I am at the point of just throwing up my arms and treating the fireplace as a decorative item and going with whatever fits the space (36-37" width max) and saying I am not gonna get the BTUs to do much of anything useful.
    What are you even asking here? Running an open fireplace is pulling more heat out of your space than it's putting into it. Get an EPA Phase II certified wood burning insert, or put a freestanding wood stove somewhere if you actually want to heat the space using solid fuel.

    You can calculate the heating demand of your space based on volume, insulation and climate, then shop for your woodstove insert based on that, while also factoring in desired burn time, how long/short your feel like bucking your logs before you split them, and if it will be a primary heat source or mainly for ambiance.
    Set my compass North, I got Winter in my blood.

  20. #1520
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    Nov 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by sirbumpsalot View Post
    On the subject of heating.....is there a good way to figure out fireplace BTUs for a given space? Everything I read online calculates based on room size (cubic sqft)....however I have an open concept (living room, kitchen, sunroom all in one space) and high ceiling and no doors to prevent heat from flowing out to hallway and up the stairs.

    I am at the point of just throwing up my arms and treating the fireplace as a decorative item and going with whatever fits the space (36-37" width max) and saying I am not gonna get the BTUs to do much of anything useful.
    Is it actually a fireplace or is it a stove? If it's a fireplace what shape is the firebox?

  21. #1521
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    Apr 2004
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    I am insulating attached garage. What size sheet rock. 5/8 or 1/2? 8ft or 12ft. Garage is 28x28 rafters 2ft centers. Plan to rent lift for installing. Googled but seem to be differing opinions.

  22. #1522
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    We basically have AdironRider’s system but with the addition of a couple solar panels and a heat exchanger, with propane to the instant on heater. We will probably never get rid of a woodstove because being so rural the power shuts off pretty often and it’s nice to have that as a cooking/heating option. All of this was basically to not use the HVAC system that was plumbed into the house originally so we could avoid the noise and draftiness. The main thing we would change is we would never have put radiant heat upstairs, as the house gets warm enough, and it’s an open design, so the heat rises up there easily.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
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  23. #1523
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    Quote Originally Posted by BFD View Post
    I am insulating attached garage. What size sheet rock. 5/8 or 1/2? 8ft or 12ft. Garage is 28x28 rafters 2ft centers. Plan to rent lift for installing. Googled but seem to be differing opinions.
    1/2 inch walls, 5/8 lid.

  24. #1524
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    Mar 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    Is it actually a fireplace or is it a stove? If it's a fireplace what shape is the firebox?
    Sorry...should have specified....standard in wall direct vented gas fireplace (glass front). Replacing a gas "stove" in the current location and vented up and out roof chimney.

    Limited cutout space so I probably can't go bigger than a 36". Firebox shapes are trapezoid.

    Just wondering how to calculate which unit based on BTUs to provide heat or if given my open concept space....its a wasted effort because I will never get that from a 36" unit.

    A "stove" is out. We are going for a traditional look (not my home nor proposed design - just an example):
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  25. #1525
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    Quote Originally Posted by I Skied Bandini Mountain View Post
    1/2 inch walls, 5/8 lid.
    This and I would seriously consider paying someone to do this. Hanging sheetrock SUCKS ASS and you will be bad at it.

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