Page 51 of 74 FirstFirst ... 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 ... LastLast
Results 1,251 to 1,275 of 1845
  1. #1251
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    your vacation
    Posts
    2,006
    Quote Originally Posted by Nobody Famous View Post
    Roof replacement on a multi-unit condo building, yikes!



    Any insights, words of advice or things to avoid are appreciated.

    hire an architect contractor engineer consultant to put together a spec sheet

    it only needs to be two pages or less, trades people lose interest after one page of reading

    spell out all the tasks to be completed
    even if it's standard
    such as off site trash removal
    daily nail clean up
    damage to building windows etc
    have someone calculate sq ft of roofing to be done but use my favortie phrase to be verified by contractor
    I love it when an architect or engineer gives me a detail to work with such as underlayment A B or C can be used 40 year 3 tab shingle green color

    or just find a reputable company fuck the multiple bids stuff and hire them, I usually walk from multiple bid situations its a waste of time

  2. #1252
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Redwood City
    Posts
    1,492
    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    why the FUCK are you putting wallpaper in a garage? That said, it's a GARAGE. The regular considerations with wallpaper and latex (too much moisture for too long) probably don't matter in this context.
    Because the workshop will be convertible to a steampunk themed speakeasy. That will include:
    - old timey wall paper and crown molding
    - (fake) copper ceiling tiles
    - Main workbench counter tops with antique maps of Puget Sound embedded in epoxy
    - Fold-down copper surface bar
    - Bar stools I am custom making out of black iron pipe
    - Lighting with Edison style lights
    "Great barbecue makes you want to slap your granny up the side of her head." - Southern Saying

  3. #1253
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    12,126
    As a homeowner I agree. If the job is done right the materials will last, if it's not the shingle company will have an out and the contractor will have retired to his yacht in a country without an extradition treaty with the US.

  4. #1254
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Making the Bowl Great Again
    Posts
    12,168
    Quote Originally Posted by LegoSkier View Post
    Because the workshop will be convertible to a steampunk themed speakeasy. That will include:
    - old timey wall paper and crown molding
    - (fake) copper ceiling tiles
    - Main workbench counter tops with antique maps of Puget Sound embedded in epoxy
    - Fold-down copper surface bar
    - Bar stools I am custom making out of black iron pipe
    - Lighting with Edison style lights
    Well maybe $30 for a gallon of the proper primer is worth it, then.

  5. #1255
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    in a box on the porch
    Posts
    4,344
    Certainteed five star warranty, covers everything including labor, and is guaranteed by Certainteed. The contractor has to be five star approved by certainteed. The Certainteed rep will come inspect the work.


    Quote Originally Posted by Nobody Famous View Post
    Roof replacement on a multi-unit condo building, yikes!

    Dealing with quotes and bids from roofing contractors is a cryptic process, you have to question and repeatedly ask to find out what materials they propose to use.

    Main stumbling block right now is writing a short one or two page spec -- not the 20-40 page kind that municipal and government jobs use -- that can apply to any contractor and get the contractors to quote equivalent materials and installation methods.

    Example of cryptic-ness: manufacturers, Certain Teed, GAF etc. offer 40 year, 50 year or lifetime warranties. To get these warranties you have to use the manufacturers ‘system,’ asphalt shingles, underlayment, ice & water shields, drip edges, ridge vents, pipe boots, sealants, etc., etc. All this is in addition to the contractor installing per “manufacturer’s instructions.” Should the contractor do something wrong, five or ten years down the road is way too late to find out.

    Some points I’ve picked up in this:

    • Lifetime warranty means for the lifetime of the original owner, or in some limited cases the next owner.
    • Warranties on materials, shingles, ice/water shield, etc. are full replacement for first ten years, then prorated after that.
    • Contractors can easily skimp on lower cost materials (to get a low bid), never mention this on their proposal, and still say or imply you have Manufacturer's warranty.
    • Labor warranties, seem like all talk/no substance, you want a warranty on workmanship that lasts for a long time, ythe contractor may be gone in five years.
    • Manufacturer’s instructions: The small details matter, fastener type, length, spacing, installation method, etc, This is but one example


    Any insights, words of advice or things to avoid are appreciated.


  6. #1256
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Couloirfornia
    Posts
    8,818
    Quote Originally Posted by LegoSkier View Post
    Because the workshop will be convertible to a steampunk themed speakeasy. That will include:
    - old timey wall paper and crown molding
    - (fake) copper ceiling tiles
    - Main workbench counter tops with antique maps of Puget Sound embedded in epoxy
    - Fold-down copper surface bar
    - Bar stools I am custom making out of black iron pipe
    - Lighting with Edison style lights
    You damn well better post photos when it's done.

    We have a legit bonus room in our place with a kitchenette and I'm going to turn into a tiki bar.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ernest_Hemingway View Post
    I realize there is not much hope for a bullfighting forum. I understand that most of you would prefer to discuss the ingredients of jacket fabrics than the ingredients of a brave man. I know nothing of the former. But the latter is made of courage, and skill, and grace in the presence of the possibility of death. If someone could make a jacket of those three things it would no doubt be the most popular and prized item in all of your closets.

  7. #1257
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    livin the dream
    Posts
    3,682
    Quote Originally Posted by fastfred View Post
    trades people lose interest after one page of reading
    🤨


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  8. #1258
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    The land of Genesee Cream Ale and homemade pierogies!
    Posts
    1,693
    Quote Originally Posted by fastfred View Post
    hire an architect contractor engineer consultant to put together a spec sheet

    it only needs to be two pages or less, trades people lose interest after one page of reading

    spell out all the tasks to be completed
    even if it's standard
    such as off site trash removal
    daily nail clean up
    damage to building windows etc
    have someone calculate sq ft of roofing to be done but use my favortie phrase to be verified by contractor
    I love it when an architect or engineer gives me a detail to work with such as underlayment A B or C can be used 40 year 3 tab shingle green color

    or just find a reputable company fuck the multiple bids stuff and hire them, I usually walk from multiple bid situations its a waste of time
    You love it, in a good way or a bad way? ... Good way meaning someone decided for you on the complete setup? Which of course may be all wrong?
    “The best argument in favour of a 90% tax rate on the rich is a five-minute chat with the average rich person.”

    - Winston Churchill, paraphrased.

  9. #1259
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Nhampshire
    Posts
    5,614
    I'm guessing likes it for real as materials costing is more even across and there's no misunderstanding. Also having it specified up front probably means less bullshit meetings/choices that soak time.

  10. #1260
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    your vacation
    Posts
    2,006
    Quote Originally Posted by Nobody Famous View Post
    You love it, in a good way or a bad way? ... Good way meaning someone decided for you on the complete setup? Which of course may be all wrong?
    yeah I love it in a good way
    I like being told what to do
    but if it's completely moronic and I know the detail is shit, which is rare, then I won't do it
    like how to properly install a door and window, I know the flashing details I will stand behind and will only do it my way
    but say a flat roof with a deck and living space under it built at 10,000 ft, I'll do what the architect/engieer spec'd and let them take the fall when it leaks, because it will leak

  11. #1261
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    154
    Collective question - old house, built by drunken miners with un-level floors to match. I have kitchen tile which is fine but I hate the color. It's laid on backer board over suspect vinyl flooring.

    Been weighing ideas:

    Since the floor is uneven, vinyl plank flooring seems like a good economic choice given this won't be my dream kitchen remodel - just some surface improvement. I'd even be open to some sort of re-surfacing over the tile.

    But with that - what I'm trying to figure out is - do I just suffer the loss of even more ceiling height by putting the new flooring over the tile?... Or do I go for breaking down the tile, getting to at least the backer and maybe try to do a leveling compound and resurface to mitigate some of the warp? I can probably get the old vinyl floor tested for asbestos to know for certain what I'm dealing with. My head starts to get stuck on - things like - well, if you are pulling it all up - spring for a better flooring like cork or a tasteful tile or just do a good for now improvement with least reasonable effort. It's a fair amount of space.

  12. #1262
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,460
    Quote Originally Posted by Carl_Mega View Post
    Collective question - old house, built by drunken miners with un-level floors to match. I have kitchen tile which is fine but I hate the color. It's laid on backer board over suspect vinyl flooring.

    Been weighing ideas:

    Since the floor is uneven, vinyl plank flooring seems like a good economic choice given this won't be my dream kitchen remodel - just some surface improvement. I'd even be open to some sort of re-surfacing over the tile.

    But with that - what I'm trying to figure out is - do I just suffer the loss of even more ceiling height by putting the new flooring over the tile?... Or do I go for breaking down the tile, getting to at least the backer and maybe try to do a leveling compound and resurface to mitigate some of the warp? I can probably get the old vinyl floor tested for asbestos to know for certain what I'm dealing with. My head starts to get stuck on - things like - well, if you are pulling it all up - spring for a better flooring like cork or a tasteful tile or just do a good for now improvement with least reasonable effort. It's a fair amount of space.
    How many square feet ? How much time and demo skill do you have to spend on this ? IF demoing can be done in 1 or 2 days might not be such a bad thing to take out the tile and backer, level and recover using a floating floor. Adding a little glue in strategic spots on a floating floor and padding can work magic. Adding an extra layer to an already raised surface might look like shit and potentially get in the way of a sale in the future depending on the quality and price point of the house. Toss up on testing the vinyl floor if this is DIY.

  13. #1263
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    livin the dream
    Posts
    3,682
    Quote Originally Posted by Carl_Mega View Post
    Collective question - old house, built by drunken miners with un-level floors to match. I have kitchen tile which is fine but I hate the color. It's laid on backer board over suspect vinyl flooring.

    Been weighing ideas:

    Since the floor is uneven, vinyl plank flooring seems like a good economic choice given this won't be my dream kitchen remodel - just some surface improvement. I'd even be open to some sort of re-surfacing over the tile.

    But with that - what I'm trying to figure out is - do I just suffer the loss of even more ceiling height by putting the new flooring over the tile?... Or do I go for breaking down the tile, getting to at least the backer and maybe try to do a leveling compound and resurface to mitigate some of the warp? I can probably get the old vinyl floor tested for asbestos to know for certain what I'm dealing with. My head starts to get stuck on - things like - well, if you are pulling it all up - spring for a better flooring like cork or a tasteful tile or just do a good for now improvement with least reasonable effort. It's a fair amount of space.
    What's the sub-floor? What's the elevation different between the lowest point to highest? Is the sub-floor uneven or the foundation uneven?

    If the sub-floor is solid, and its < 3/4" of elevation difference, you can pour self leveling ardex, anything more it will crack. If the sub-floor is flexy it will crack.

    Re: Asbestos. Once you know its there, you know its there. If it was my home, I would not test it. I'd just rent an air scrubber, put on a P100 respirator and tyvek suit, and get rid of it as cleanly as possible.
    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  14. #1264
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    PRB
    Posts
    22,380
    Once you know it is asbestos, you cannot pay someone else to remove it unless they are licensed in asbestos remediation.

    If you plan to DIY in any event, no harm in testing. But if I were you, I'd make the "remove" decision first, and only use testing to determine how you remove it. If you plan to leave it if it tests hot, then don't test and just leave it.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin

  15. #1265
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    slc
    Posts
    11,513
    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    Re: Asbestos. Once you know its there, you know its there. If it was my home, I would not test it. I'd just rent an air scrubber, put on a P100 respirator and tyvek suit, and get rid of it as cleanly as possible.
    This.

    Quote Originally Posted by Danno View Post
    If you plan to leave it if it tests hot, then don't test and just leave it.
    Also this.

  16. #1266
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    154
    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    What's the sub-floor? What's the elevation different between the lowest point to highest? Is the sub-floor uneven or the foundation uneven?

    If the sub-floor is solid, and its < 3/4" of elevation difference, you can pour self leveling ardex, anything more it will crack. If the sub-floor is flexy it will crack.

    Re: Asbestos. Once you know its there, you know its there. If it was my home, I would not test it. I'd just rent an air scrubber, put on a P100 respirator and tyvek suit, and get rid of it as cleanly as possible.
    Thanks guys. My house is 1/2 old, 1/2 new. The kitchen is the gateway from old to new - the foundation settling in the old part is what caused the uneveness. The subfloor is actually boards - not ply or osb. The settling resulted in a high joist almost dead center - I'll need to measure the runout but probably in the 3/4 range. Rough sqft ~200. While writing this, I double checked and it's actually TWO vinyl layers - I think the bottom one is suspect. Ugh: subfloor boards - old vinyl - more recent vinyl - backer - thinset - tile. Mtn methods at it's finest. That said, the floor actually feels solid.

    A few days of demo isn't a big deal for me at all. However, my nerves can't handle messing with bad junk in the house - been there done that. If it's me doing it, I'd prefer to test it to know - at this pt, leave it undisturbed. So if I find it has asbestos and elect to get it removed - I'm hiring a professional and getting a proper kitchen remodel soup to nuts. At this point, I'd be happy just making it look a bit more contemporary.

  17. #1267
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    154
    Quote Originally Posted by Carl_Mega View Post
    Thanks guys. My house is 1/2 old, 1/2 new. The kitchen is the gateway from old to new - the foundation settling in the old part is what caused the uneveness. The subfloor is actually boards - not ply or osb. The settling resulted in a high joist almost dead center - I'll need to measure the runout but probably in the 3/4 range. Rough sqft ~200. While writing this, I double checked and it's actually TWO vinyl layers - I think the bottom one is suspect. Ugh: subfloor boards - old vinyl - more recent vinyl - backer - thinset - tile. Mtn methods at it's finest. That said, the floor actually feels solid.

    A few days of demo isn't a big deal for me at all. However, my nerves can't handle messing with bad junk in the house - been there done that. If it's me doing it, I'd prefer to test it to know - at this pt, leave it undisturbed. So if I find it has asbestos and elect to get it removed - I'm hiring a professional and getting a proper kitchen remodel soup to nuts. At this point, I'd be happy just making it look a bit more contemporary.
    Edit: a few replies after I started that. So, knowing I prob wouldn't remove the vinyl myself - is it reasonable to try and demo the tile to the backer knowing there's vinyl underneath I don't want to distrub - or is that coming along for the ride?

  18. #1268
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    11,722
    Quote Originally Posted by Carl_Mega View Post
    Edit: a few replies after I started that. So, knowing I prob wouldn't remove the vinyl myself - is it reasonable to try and demo the tile to the backer knowing there's vinyl underneath I don't want to distrub - or is that coming along for the ride?
    personally my belief, and I been around a good amount of asbestos, is that if you aren't subjected to it over and over for longer periods of time I wouldn't stress a one time removal. tyvek, respirator, plastic off the space VERY well from other house space and wet the heck out of it. That keeps the dust at bay. Its exactly what a pro removal team would do. They might put in some air handlers too, but thats likely a regulatory issue. The cost for the pros to remove is based on the insurance they have to carry.
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  19. #1269
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    base of the Bush
    Posts
    11,952
    If the installer used high quality thinset good luck with leaving the backer down.
    Is there a post in the basement holding that joist high?

  20. #1270
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    154
    Quote Originally Posted by Vt-Freeheel View Post
    If the installer used high quality thinset good luck with leaving the backer down.
    Is there a post in the basement holding that joist high?
    Yeah, that's sort of what I was expecting. I've removed tile before but backer over ply in in an entry way and tbh if I was doing it again, I'd see if I could just remove the ply section as that was a pain. Obviously, this is all DIY and I'm full of mistakes and bad ideas which I'm ok with so long as I don't create a much worse situation.

    I wish I had a basement. The old house portion is a craptastic crawlspace. I had the engineers out years ago before I bought the place. "Some event, years ago. Not worth correcting leveling the foundation unless you absolutely need but it's done". I have a report somewhere.

    I respect the opinions on the asbestos - I don't want to get into it but I got roped into something when I was a young man and found it later it was toxic. Still haunts me & I don't even like talking about it. At this point of my life, I can afford the professionals if that's what needs doing. I've long since accepted that potential cost as a byproduct on the eventual full kitchen remodel.

    I really appreciate the guidance here. Since I'm more into a visual improvement with a shelf-life @ this point, my read is:

    1) removing the tile almost certainly will disturb the vinyl underneath
    2) as I expected, on-top of the tile is adding to a layer-cake of ugliness

    Maybe I'll re-look into some of the paint/coat tile options. Sounded like lots of prep and spotty results but not much to lose but time. Might even let me take a fashion risk since it won't be forever.

  21. #1271
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    1,212
    Exterior door is rubbing/hitting on the upper left opposite the hinge. I think the contractor fucked up the install or the house settled. No other obvious indications the house has settled. I can clearly see that the door is not square in the frame.

    I could easily sand the frame down and make this work or I could pull the interior trim and try to square up the frame. I think it might be out front to back as well as I am having trouble getting a good deal on the weather stripping. Thoughts?

    I've set and trimmed interior doors, but haven't screwed around with exterior doors.

  22. #1272
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    12,078
    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    Re: Asbestos. Once you know its there, you know its there. If it was my home, I would not test it. I'd just rent an air scrubber, put on a P100 respirator and tyvek suit, and get rid of it as cleanly as possible.
    Make sure to mist with water as you scrape. It'll keep the fibers from flying into the air.

    EDIT: I see Skidog covered that, but leaving this here since it is very key.
    Screw the net, Surf the backcountry!

  23. #1273
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    seattle
    Posts
    607
    I have a few interior doors about 100 years old that have become bent over time making them difficult to latch. They are 2x6 around the perimeter with thin ply in the middle. Has anyone had success bending doors straight? How is it done?

  24. #1274
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Making the Bowl Great Again
    Posts
    12,168
    Quote Originally Posted by skialpy View Post
    I have a few interior doors about 100 years old that have become bent over time making them difficult to latch. They are 2x6 around the perimeter with thin ply in the middle. Has anyone had success bending doors straight? How is it done?
    It is not done. You can adjust the stops and hardware or you can get new doors.

  25. #1275
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Making the Bowl Great Again
    Posts
    12,168
    Quote Originally Posted by char_ View Post
    Exterior door is rubbing/hitting on the upper left opposite the hinge. I think the contractor fucked up the install or the house settled. No other obvious indications the house has settled. I can clearly see that the door is not square in the frame.

    I could easily sand the frame down and make this work or I could pull the interior trim and try to square up the frame. I think it might be out front to back as well as I am having trouble getting a good deal on the weather stripping. Thoughts?

    I've set and trimmed interior doors, but haven't screwed around with exterior doors.
    How old is the house? Sounds like you built it? I would call the contractor first.

    Failing that, take some pictures. How is the reveal down the sides and on the bottom? Most exterior doors have built in sills so adjusting them is different than tweaking interior doors.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •