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  1. #1101
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    Quote Originally Posted by snoqpass View Post
    MDF is the formaldehyde in the adhesive the other is sawdust is known to be a carcinogen and since MDF is basically sawdust and glue
    this should be illegal
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  2. #1102
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    expensive paint or expensive brush

    discuss

    prerequisites for this discussion:

    be able to cut freehand (both hands) vertical/horizontal real deal mullions
    no razoring glass
    no tape
    no drop cloth
    My Company: Made in Colorado SKi Clothing- check it out

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  3. #1103
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiCol View Post
    expensive paint or expensive brush

    discuss

    prerequisites for this discussion:

    be able to cut freehand (both hands) vertical/horizontal real deal mullions
    no razoring glass
    no tape
    no drop cloth
    dream on

  4. #1104
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Hugh's Mom's House
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiCol View Post
    expensive paint or expensive brush
    Yes.

    And expensive rollers.

    I will, however, use a drop cloth if there is any sort of carpet or fabric around just because multiple beers + whatever else = occasional lapse of concentration. I will also use tape if painting trim, but only if it needs painter's caulk to fill gaps, and then I will paint over the tape and use a new blade to cut as I pull the tape.

  5. #1105
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    Dec 2003
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    Seattle
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiCol View Post
    expensive paint or expensive brush

    discuss

    prerequisites for this discussion:

    be able to cut freehand (both hands) vertical/horizontal real deal mullions
    no razoring glass
    no tape
    no drop cloth
    Masking liquid.
    Quote Originally Posted by Downbound Train View Post
    And there will come a day when our ancestors look back...........

  6. #1106
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    May 2007
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    Sandy, Utah
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiCol View Post
    expensive paint or expensive brush

    discuss

    prerequisites for this discussion:

    be able to cut freehand (both hands) vertical/horizontal real deal mullions
    no razoring glass
    no tape
    no drop cloth
    Expensive brush for sure. I recco purdy. I literally have brushes that are 20 years old, used for 100s of hours and still cut a straight line no masking needed. Care for your tools.

    I only mask stuff when I spray which is rare. I just primed 1400sq ft, ceilings included, in about 10 hours this past weekend.

    Have fun

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    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  7. #1107
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    Feb 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiCol View Post
    expensive paint or expensive brush

    discuss

    prerequisites for this discussion:

    be able to cut freehand (both hands) vertical/horizontal real deal mullions
    no razoring glass
    no tape
    no drop cloth
    I’d go with expensive brush and at least moderately good paint. (By that I mean not behr.)

    I can do all of the above but I’m painfully fucking slow.
    Damn, we're in a tight spot!

  8. #1108
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    it is evident that this place is full of a bunch of pros
    My Company: Made in Colorado SKi Clothing- check it out

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  9. #1109
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    Nov 2005
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    Yeah I lied, I can't cut both directions with my left hand...only to the left.

  10. #1110
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    May 2007
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    Sandy, Utah
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    Quote Originally Posted by MiCol View Post
    it is evident that this place is full of a bunch of pros
    i did paint houses "professionally" for 10+ years so that helped. I can cut either direction straight, with either hand. I do require a dropcloth or that it be new construction with floors refinished last.

    I will also always mask carpets so I kinda fibbed a little.

    the key to a straight line is a good brush.
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  11. #1111
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    truckee
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    10,742
    There were two guys who painted the inside of our hospital and office building--when they finished they started over. They never used drop cloths--even over carpet, never masked, and never had a drop of paint on their uniforms. That level of skill is beyond my comprehension. I have to use a drop cloth just to fill out the shopping list on my refrigerator.

  12. #1112
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    5,372
    I get paint in my hair, all over my clothes, face, arms, and then I track paint all over the wood floors after stepping in paint that's on the drop cloths.

    Otherwise I'm a great painter.

  13. #1113
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    May 2007
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    Sandy, Utah
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    Quote Originally Posted by muted View Post
    I get paint in my hair, all over my clothes, face, arms, and then I track paint all over the wood floors after stepping in paint that's on the drop cloths.

    Otherwise I'm a great painter.
    i get paint all over myself and clothing, but rarely anywhere else but the walls its intended for. Drop cloths let me move a bit faster as I dont have to pay attention as closely.
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  14. #1114
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    Nov 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by muted View Post
    I get paint in my hair, all over my clothes, face, arms, and then I track paint all over the wood floors after stepping in paint that's on the drop cloths.

    Otherwise I'm a great painter.
    consider yourself docked a weeks pay....
    My Company: Made in Colorado SKi Clothing- check it out

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  15. #1115
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    Nov 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    i get paint all over myself and clothing, but rarely anywhere else but the walls its intended for. Drop cloths let me move a bit faster as I dont have to pay attention as closely.
    you too but only half
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  16. #1116
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    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    Yeah I lied, I can't cut both directions with my left hand...only to the left.
    right on left hand may be moot point and maybe can cover with 3 other positions
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  17. #1117
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    PRB
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    21,078
    I prefer hiring an expensive painter to expensive paint or expensive brushes.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin

  18. #1118
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    Oct 2003
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    Ogden
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    ^^^Ill get in touch with them, itd be awesome to get some builder recs. Im ready to go on this thing soon. Just got home and snapped a few photos of the current garage.

    Looking down the driveway, Im thinking I could go about 8 feet wider to lookers right:
    Attachment 284737

    Hard to tell from the photo but the driveway is long single width and goes under Porte cochere. So wouldnt ever park more than one car in there.
    Attachment 284738

    And then from my back porch. You can see that this east side is partially below grade. Itd be awesome if I could get rid of that old pool house and combine it into one new place. But all of the pool stuff is piped into there through slab so Im not sure how expensive thatd be.
    Attachment 284739
    So I had the first guy come and look today. He is going to send me an estimate but he's guessing that building in the same location as current will add nearly 25k to the total cost due to excavation, retaining walls, extra concrete etc. He suggested demoing the current and building new in the side yard with a new approach. I've got the room but I have to roll it around. Neighbors would probably hate it.

  19. #1119
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    784
    Quote Originally Posted by MiCol View Post
    expensive paint or expensive brush

    discuss

    prerequisites for this discussion:

    be able to cut freehand (both hands) vertical/horizontal real deal mullions
    no razoring glass
    no tape
    no drop cloth
    If the brush is new, I'd rather expensive paint and a cheap new brush. This holds until the cheap brush is beat up enough to have to have parts cut off cause they will no longer line up.

  20. #1120
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    784
    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    That thing is going to rock like the fucking titanic unless you put corner bracing and/or bury the posts as suggested.
    What he said. Use something like this at the column/beam connection. Simpson connector. Bolt through.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	CC46.01.jpg 
Views:	55 
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ID:	285743

    Though the titanic didn't rock. It just sunk.

    Edit: sorry. Do not know how to shrink image.

  21. #1121
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    Jan 2008
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    truckee
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    10,742
    Quote Originally Posted by beece View Post
    If the brush is new, I'd rather expensive paint and a cheap new brush. This holds until the cheap brush is beat up enough to have to have parts cut off cause they will no longer line up.
    For clear finishes like polyurethane foam brushes work very well if you dont have to cut in, which sucks because I have some very expensive brushes which aren't as good. I recently used foam brushes to paint stainless steel paint onto the black side of a supposedly stainless steel range and it came out well.

  22. #1122
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    311
    I need some wisdom from the collective on attic ventilation.

    I live in an old-ass bungalow - my neighborhood was built out in the early 1900s. About 7 or 8 years ago, the city gave us a weatherization loan, and we had the attic insulated with sprayed in foam insulation. I don't remember the promised r-value, but we have maybe 5 or 6 inches of foam up there, which was applied to the floor of the attic.

    At the time we had the foam installed, the contractor told me we needed additional roof jacks because the attic installation wasn't up to code, and we had them do that work as well. FWIW, the contractor was essentially chosen by the city - they had approved a small number of contractors to participate in this weatherization program and we didn't have a choice in which one did the work.

    At any rate, I haven't given it much thought since the work was done - the house is noticeably better insulated and quieter, and I thought that was the end of it. But today, I went up in the attic because I thought we might have a squirrel issue, and it was well over 100 degrees, maybe pushing 110. It shouldn't be that hot: we had a few hot days earlier this week, but it's been pretty cool since then - high around 80 and nights in the 50s.

    With that in mind, I looked around and we definitely have all the promised roof jacks, which are installed near the roof peak, but I'm pretty sure the contractor foamed over the eave vents: I can't see any daylight around the eaves, and there are no baffles or anything like that to allow airflow in from the eave vents. That's what I get for not going up there to look it over after the work was done.

    Given that this was something like a $4k project 8 years ago, I figure it's a waste of time to contact the contractor, so how should I proceed?

    I'm pretty sure of the diagnosis, but what should I do to confirm there's an issue, and what's the fix? My first thought is to go around the outside of the house, pull off the eave vents, and use a jab saw or maybe an auger bit to open a channel for airflow. Am I on the right track?

    TIA for all wisdom and amusing snark.

  23. #1123
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Alpental
    Posts
    3,500
    You need air to flow or youre going to have issues later on
    I have a responsibility to not be intimidated and bullied by low life losers who abuse what little power is granted to them as ski patrollers.

  24. #1124
    DJSapp's Avatar
    DJSapp is online now (╯□)╯︵ ┻━┻
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan_pdx View Post
    I need some wisdom from the collective on attic ventilation.

    I live in an old-ass bungalow - my neighborhood was built out in the early 1900s. About 7 or 8 years ago, the city gave us a weatherization loan, and we had the attic insulated with sprayed in foam insulation. I don't remember the promised r-value, but we have maybe 5 or 6 inches of foam up there, which was applied to the floor of the attic.

    At the time we had the foam installed, the contractor told me we needed additional roof jacks because the attic installation wasn't up to code, and we had them do that work as well. FWIW, the contractor was essentially chosen by the city - they had approved a small number of contractors to participate in this weatherization program and we didn't have a choice in which one did the work.

    At any rate, I haven't given it much thought since the work was done - the house is noticeably better insulated and quieter, and I thought that was the end of it. But today, I went up in the attic because I thought we might have a squirrel issue, and it was well over 100 degrees, maybe pushing 110. It shouldn't be that hot: we had a few hot days earlier this week, but it's been pretty cool since then - high around 80 and nights in the 50s.

    With that in mind, I looked around and we definitely have all the promised roof jacks, which are installed near the roof peak, but I'm pretty sure the contractor foamed over the eave vents: I can't see any daylight around the eaves, and there are no baffles or anything like that to allow airflow in from the eave vents. That's what I get for not going up there to look it over after the work was done.

    Given that this was something like a $4k project 8 years ago, I figure it's a waste of time to contact the contractor, so how should I proceed?

    I'm pretty sure of the diagnosis, but what should I do to confirm there's an issue, and what's the fix? My first thought is to go around the outside of the house, pull off the eave vents, and use a jab saw or maybe an auger bit to open a channel for airflow. Am I on the right track?

    TIA for all wisdom and amusing snark.
    Hot wire saw is the tool for cutting out the extra foam. No dusty mess as you melt through the foam cutting the vents back out.

    Don't set your house on fire. Keep it moving and mind where you set it. If access is that tight, just drill through it with the largest wood boring bit you have and deal with the dust and crumbs from the foam.

    Sent from my Pixel XL using TGR Forums mobile app
    Fat fuck bubbas are not erosion.

  25. #1125
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    inpdx
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan_pdx View Post
    I need some wisdom from the collective on attic ventilation.

    I live in an old-ass bungalow - my neighborhood was built out in the early 1900s. About 7 or 8 years ago, the city gave us a weatherization loan, and we had the attic insulated with sprayed in foam insulation. I don't remember the promised r-value, but we have maybe 5 or 6 inches of foam up there, which was applied to the floor of the attic.

    At the time we had the foam installed, the contractor told me we needed additional roof jacks because the attic installation wasn't up to code, and we had them do that work as well. FWIW, the contractor was essentially chosen by the city - they had approved a small number of contractors to participate in this weatherization program and we didn't have a choice in which one did the work.

    At any rate, I haven't given it much thought since the work was done - the house is noticeably better insulated and quieter, and I thought that was the end of it. But today, I went up in the attic because I thought we might have a squirrel issue, and it was well over 100 degrees, maybe pushing 110. It shouldn't be that hot: we had a few hot days earlier this week, but it's been pretty cool since then - high around 80 and nights in the 50s.

    With that in mind, I looked around and we definitely have all the promised roof jacks, which are installed near the roof peak, but I'm pretty sure the contractor foamed over the eave vents: I can't see any daylight around the eaves, and there are no baffles or anything like that to allow airflow in from the eave vents. That's what I get for not going up there to look it over after the work was done.

    Given that this was something like a $4k project 8 years ago, I figure it's a waste of time to contact the contractor, so how should I proceed?

    I'm pretty sure of the diagnosis, but what should I do to confirm there's an issue, and what's the fix? My first thought is to go around the outside of the house, pull off the eave vents, and use a jab saw or maybe an auger bit to open a channel for airflow. Am I on the right track?

    TIA for all wisdom and amusing snark.
    Pm me - lets talk

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