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  1. #5201
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    Oct 2002
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    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Striker View Post
    If you're running it on the outside of the wall, where's it going, through the floor or into an interior side wall? If the answer is floor, will future you be cursing the present you when you have to replace the machines and/or redo the room?
    Nah. It’d be along the wall and through the floor into the basement. A claw foot tub used to live in the space and any redo would already have to account for that. The plumbing already lives directly below where I’m putting the washer. All straight shots.

    I guess rationalization me is thinking putting it in the wall is a larger pain in the ass for no obvious benefit since nobody will ever see it. But fucking escutcheons, man….
    focus.

  2. #5202
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
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    EWA
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    When you see something that is not right, not just, not fair, you have a moral obligation to say something. To do something." Rep. John Lewis


    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  3. #5203
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
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    25,473
    It looks cool but it doesnt look sealed, are you going to seal it ?

    we don't have pennys up here they just round up or down to a nickel, so I still had a yogurt container full of pennys which I gave to a hippy friend, after flattening them with a freight train she makes earings
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  4. #5204
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    They spent a pretty penny on that one.

  5. #5205
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    Not my project and I wondered the same myself - how will it be sealed.

    If you follow the two links at the top of my post (1. FB page, 2. Website) you can find that particular project. I did not read it (yet). Just saw it in my FB feed.

    I did peek at FB page and there are many many really cool projects.
    When you see something that is not right, not just, not fair, you have a moral obligation to say something. To do something." Rep. John Lewis


    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  6. #5206
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
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    14,411
    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post
    Not my project and I wondered the same myself - how will it be sealed.

    If you follow the two links at the top of my post (1. FB page, 2. Website) you can find that particular project. I did not read it (yet). Just saw it in my FB feed.

    I did peek at FB page and there are many many really cool projects.
    They typically pour an epoxy over. I have friend who did one like it. She said she would never do again. Cool concept I have no patience for.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using TGR Forums mobile app

  7. #5207
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Joisey
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    1,987
    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    They typically pour an epoxy over. I have friend who did one like it. She said she would never do again. Cool concept I have no patience for.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using TGR Forums mobile app
    And then when that epoxy yellows and gets all scratched up, you have an ugly mess.
    Because rich has nothing to do with money.

  8. #5208
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1,754
    https://denver.cbslocal.com/2021/09/...orado-springs/

    I was all ready to tar and feather the homeowner until I saw some photos of the work that are floating around - it was really crappy

  9. #5209
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dystopia
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    14,508
    Quote Originally Posted by Mustonen View Post
    ^^^ which, my current project: moving a washer and dryer into a bathroom and out of a bedroom. Lazy DIY me wants to just run the drain and supply up behind the washer, outside the wall. Clamped to the wall so it’s secure, though ugly. It’ll be hidden by the washer and if I place it right it won’t bump the washer out any further. Final product will be finished with a countertop above front load washer and dryer, under a window, cabinet in between. Additional and primary rationale (rationalization) is that it’s an outside wall and I’ve had bad experiences with frozen supply lines to washers in this area.

    But the derision higher up in this thread about fucking escutcheons under the sink has me second guessing that.

    Thoughts?
    Just do it. Fuck the haters.

    The only ones that would know is an appliance repairman and you.
    “I’m a subhuman jizz monkey”

    Thx mods. It’s an awesome signature.

  10. #5210
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    Mar 2008
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    But those escutcheons really tie the room together.

  11. #5211
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    Dec 2012
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    14,171
    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post
    I would have painted the trimwork first, but that's just me.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  12. #5212
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    299
    A section of gutter pulled away from the house. It was attached on the inside through a spacer using 1 1/2" screws that pulled out from the house. Never had a problem before and it's not clogged and no trees above- wood feels solid to me but is probably 100 years old. There was some rain while I was away but nothing huge and older sections with nails are fine- this section was installed new a couple years ago. Easiest solution seems to be getting bigger screws and try to reattach- but I don't want to repeat a mistake I already paid for if there's a better way.

  13. #5213
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    cordova,AK
    Posts
    3,145
    anyone experienced with fast wall concentrate? It is made by El Rey. A stucco product that you can skip the scratch coat. I have a small job under 200sqft figured good place to learn.
    off your knees Louie

  14. #5214
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    14,171
    For occasional weekender type demo work, 2 by's with nails etc. are the 1 handed recip saws better all around tools? In as much they can do everything a 2 hander can do, just not as fast?
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  15. #5215
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    the ham
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    IMO a traditional sawzall type recip saw is the first one to own. The one-hander is in the "nice to have" category. Plus, they haven't seemed to agree on the shape of the smaller saws, so some of them are pretty awkward.

  16. #5216
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
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    7,011
    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Striker View Post
    IMO a traditional sawzall type recip saw is the first one to own. The one-hander is in the "nice to have" category. Plus, they haven't seemed to agree on the shape of the smaller saws, so some of them are pretty awkward.
    Agreed. The medium sized cordless ones do a good job. Blades are key. Sawzall is usually a tool of last resort. Even for demo, it feels hack. Personally, I like to cut the studs in the middle with a skilly them just pull the two halfs off the plate.

  17. #5217
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    14,171
    Hmmm. That's what I'm familiar with as I used to borrow my neighbor's corded one, but he's moved. So now I'm looking to buy.

    I totally get the the butcher aspect of it but I've got about 6' of rotten rim joist I have to replace and it's a tight fit. It appears to be a doubled up 2x10 under an exterior door in a 1930's era house. My circular can't get under there or make the vertical cut.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  18. #5218
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    7,011
    I like the Dewalt Flexvolt but only because that is what I'm committed to. I'm guessing they are all good enough.

  19. #5219
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    Dec 2012
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    14,171
    Yeah, I'm sorta sucked in to the whole Dewalt battery ecosystem as well. I fondled the Dewalt 1 handed and it seems pretty balanced with ok ergos. Oh decisions. Thanks for the input gents.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  20. #5220
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    Jan 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    Hmmm. That's what I'm familiar with as I used to borrow my neighbor's corded one, but he's moved. So now I'm looking to buy.

    I totally get the the butcher aspect of it but I've got about 6' of rotten rim joist I have to replace and it's a tight fit. It appears to be a doubled up 2x10 under an exterior door in a 1930's era house. My circular can't get under there or make the vertical cut.
    Pawns shops are full of perfectly good sawzalls. Remember - listed price divided by half.

  21. #5221
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    the ham
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    Yeah, I'm sorta sucked in to the whole Dewalt battery ecosystem as well. I fondled the Dewalt 1 handed and it seems pretty balanced with ok ergos. Oh decisions. Thanks for the input gents.
    I might have a dewalt sawzall style with no battery (and I don't remember the voltage) that's been sitting unused for about a decade. If I can find it, it's yours for the shipping cost.

  22. #5222
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
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    14,411
    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    Yeah, I'm sorta sucked in to the whole Dewalt battery ecosystem as well. I fondled the Dewalt 1 handed and it seems pretty balanced with ok ergos. Oh decisions. Thanks for the input gents.
    if you dont mind a cord check the lowes and home depot rental depts. They often sell off those type tools cheap. I have a rigid I got for like $30 been using it for a long time....

  23. #5223
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    Oct 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    Agreed. The medium sized cordless ones do a good job. Blades are key. Sawzall is usually a tool of last resort. Even for demo, it feels hack. Personally, I like to cut the studs in the middle with a skilly them just pull the two halfs off the plate.
    We took a non weight bearing wall out at our old house. I pulled the trim off and all the electrical out and cut the seams in the drywall, with plans to finish demo after work the next day. My (now ex) wife took the initiative to finish it off her own self with the sawzall while I was at work. Cut the wall in half, similar idea to what you describe, but drywall still attached, and proceeded to pull the bottom two-thirds off first, narrowly escaping injury or worse when the top half fell down immediately afterwards.
    focus.

  24. #5224
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Where the climate suits my clothes.
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    5,091
    My trusty old blue Ryobi Sawzall does all I've ever needed it to do. Fresh blades are key, and cheap enough..

    I am already committed to their batteries, so there's that.

    2 handed all the way.

  25. #5225
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,881
    For dedicated demo I run Milwaukee super sawzall(corded). Otherwise I'm also team yellow and about to grab a new 60volt one as my smaller 20v snapped like a #instavanlifer.

    Also only run diablo blades on most things.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using TGR Forums mobile app

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