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  1. #901
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    Dec 2016
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    In a van... down by the river
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    10,299
    Yikes!

  2. #902
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    Dec 2012
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    I can still smell Poutine.
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    Passive is better than solar powered active. I've seen and lived in a number of hippie houses that were very easy to heat and cool in VT. It seems the trend is away from that and toward high-tech solutions that use solar and batteries. How about adding modern solar and batteries for the few watts needed to regulate a passive house?

  3. #903
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    It's bread-baking day, and it has been a bitch getting things below 70F at night in the house... so I suspect I may need to engage the A/C today for a little while.

  4. #904
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldMember View Post
    Holy hell, I saw some of the damage caused by the hail with the storms. Lucky if you don't have any damage.
    Go get some roofer


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  5. #905
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    Sep 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by riser4 View Post
    Passive is better than solar powered active. I've seen and lived in a number of hippie houses that were very easy to heat and cool in VT. It seems the trend is away from that and toward high-tech solutions that use solar and batteries. How about adding modern solar and batteries for the few watts needed to regulate a passive house?
    Our house works pretty well passively, opening windows at night and closing up during the day, until the daytime high exceeds 90F. 80F in the house at 9:00pm is more than I can take.

    It's an old hippie house build in the early 80s with one arm aligned solar east west and the other arm aligned magnetic north/south. So the two parts meet at an angle. The upstairs hall in the solar aligned part has the sun shining exactly down it at the equinoxes.

    The original grid dependent electric furnace is pretty shot, so we're installing a heat pump next week. I'm hoping that we can use it sparingly when it gets too hot.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
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  6. #906
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    Jan 2010
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    Walpole NH
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    Heat wave finally let go of its grip for good today, currently 74 degrees with a 46 degree dew point, wind from the NW. A perfect day in the Shire.
    crab in my shoe mouth

  7. #907
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    Mar 2012
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    The Bull City
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    Quote Originally Posted by buttahflake View Post
    Heat wave finally let go of its grip for good today, currently 74 degrees with a 46 degree dew point, wind from the NW. A perfect day in the Shire.
    Same here.. Looking like only 80s through the weekend.. and the grass has finally slowed down to the mow every two weeks rate.

    Those hail damage photos remind me of living in Texas and Oklahoma. Seeing shit like that seems to have eked farther and farther north since the 90s.
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  8. #908
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    3,167
    Quote Originally Posted by SumJongGuy View Post
    Same here.. Looking like only 80s through the weekend.. and the grass has finally slowed down to the mow every two weeks rate.

    Those hail damage photos remind me of living in Texas and Oklahoma. Seeing shit like that seems to have eked farther and farther north since the 90s.
    I was working at a tech company in the DFW area back in the 90s. We hired a guy from California, and he and his wife came out on their house hunting trip and got caught in a storm with softball size hail on the drive in from the airport. Wrecked the rental car they were driving and blew out the windshield. Luckily they made it to an overpass to hide under without any bodily injuries, but the wife insisted on going directly back to the airport and California the next day.

  9. #909
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    Sounds like the wife had her shit together. Texass deserves softball size hail for being such morans.
    Quote Originally Posted by leroy jenkins View Post
    I think you'd have an easier time understanding people if you remembered that 80% of them are fucking morons.
    That is why I like dogs, more than most people.

  10. #910
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    May 2016
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    3,167
    Quote Originally Posted by liv2ski View Post
    Sounds like the wife had her shit together. Texass deserves softball size hail for being such morans.
    Very intelligent post. I wish I were as smart as you.

  11. #911
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    Mar 2012
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    The Bull City
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    There are a few progressive pockets in Texas. Austin is like the Santa Fe of Texas. It truly is a hellscape weather wise though.. No beaches, no snow, but a few nice manmade lakes. Fantastic music scene. SRV and ZZ Top got their notoriety gigging there.
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  12. #912
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    Nov 2002
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    EWA
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    105 today - just another hot day in EWA. Consitently running 15° above average.

    Anyone catch this:

    Map shows 'extreme heat belt' projected to cover a quarter of the US in 30 years, where temperatures would breach 125 degrees Fahrenheit


    The US counties where First Street Foundation expects temperatures to exceed 125 degrees Fahrenheit at least one day in 2053.

    The heat waves scorching the US this summer may just be the beginning of an extreme heat belt forming across the country.

    "If people think this was hot — this is going to be one of the better summers of the rest of their lives," Matthew Eby, CEO of the climate-risk research nonprofit First Street Foundation, told Insider.

    The foundation published a "Hazardous Heat" report on Monday, using a peer-reviewed model to assess six years of US government satellite data and predict future risk of extreme heat by property. Its conclusions align with scientists' warnings that extreme heat will become more common, more extreme, and longer-lasting in the coming decades.

    That's about one-third of the current population, covering one-quarter of the US land area, as shown in the map below.

    Next year, the report projects that 8 million Americans face the prospect of sweltering in at least 125 degrees Fahrenheit for at least one day. By 2053, that would rise to 107 million Americans — 13 times more people in just 30 years, according to the report.


    Counties where at least one day is expected to breach 125 degrees Fahrenheit in 2023 (left) and 2053 (right).

    The majority of that extreme heat is expected in the center of the country, from the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast up through Chicago — an area that First Street Foundation is calling the "extreme heat belt." Significant portions of the southwest and southeast are also likely to have more than one day above 125 degrees Fahrenheit in 2053, according to the report.

    At such high temperatures, the National Weather Service warns that risk of heat stroke is high. Infrastructure often fails at such high temperatures, too. Roads buckle, train tracks bend and can cause derailing, and airport tarmacs can melt and prevent takeoff. Sometimes the power even goes out.

    Days that breach 125 degrees Fahrenheit aren't the only ones to worry about. Even temperatures above 100 degrees can be dangerous. In another map, below, the report projects more days above 100 degrees across the southern half of the country.


    Circles represent days above 100 degrees Fahrenheit in 2023 (left) and 2053 (right). Darker colors indicate a greater number of days, while the sizes of the circles represent the number of properties impacted.

    The extreme heat of the summer so far in 2020 lines up with many of the locations where First Street Foundation expects the most heat in years to come, Eby said.

    For example, as the map below shows, the report projects more heat waves across the country, with significantly increased risk in northern areas including the Pacific Northwest, and other regions that aren't historically accustomed to extreme heat.


    The county-by-county probability of a heat wave — three consecutive days above the 98th percentile for the local area — in 2023 (left) and 2053 (right).

    The projections in this report are conservative, since it assumed a future scenario where humans drastically cut the greenhouse-gas emissions that are driving climate change and increasing global temperatures.

    If the world doesn't cut emissions soon — particularly through a rapid transition away from fossil fuels to clean energy — the future of extreme heat could look even worse than the maps in this report.


    "If anything, our undercuts or our underrepresentation of these heat impacts will be noticed in 30 years," Eby said.

    Even if humans stop emitting greenhouse gases tomorrow, some heating is locked in by the gases we've already added to the atmosphere. To protect life, infrastructure, and property, Eby said, individuals and companies and governments have to prepare for more extreme heat in the future.

    "Our hope is that this data can inform everyone from the individual, to commercial users to state, local and federal governments, which are all users of our data," he said.

    Their data is publicly available on riskfactor.com, where you can check past data, as well as current and future risks for individual properties.
    When you see something that is not right, not just, not fair, you have a moral obligation to say something. To do something." Rep. John Lewis


    Kindness is a bridge between all people

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  13. #913
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Stumptown
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    8,708
    125 in the DC area sounds absolutely dreadful. 90 there feels like a sauna

  14. #914
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    Jan 2010
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    In the swamp
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    10,073
    Got home from a hot and humid SoCal to 68° in Denver yesterday afternoon. Felt unreal.

  15. #915
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    Dec 2009
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    in a box on the porch
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    The last two posts are why I live where I do.


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  16. #916
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    Mar 2005
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    Dystopia
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    17,269
    Quote Originally Posted by skiballs View Post
    The last two posts are why I live where I do.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    What kind of box on a porch is it?
    Just cardboard? Or have you upgraded to a wooden crate?

  17. #917
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    The Bull City
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    10,137
    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post
    105 today - just another hot day in EWA. Consitently running 15° above average.

    Anyone catch this:

    Map shows 'extreme heat belt' projected to cover a quarter of the US in 30 years, where temperatures would breach 125 degrees Fahrenheit


    The US counties where First Street Foundation expects temperatures to exceed 125 degrees Fahrenheit at least one day in 2053.

    The heat waves scorching the US this summer may just be the beginning of an extreme heat belt forming across the country.

    "If people think this was hot — this is going to be one of the better summers of the rest of their lives," Matthew Eby, CEO of the climate-risk research nonprofit First Street Foundation, told Insider.

    The foundation published a "Hazardous Heat" report on Monday, using a peer-reviewed model to assess six years of US government satellite data and predict future risk of extreme heat by property. Its conclusions align with scientists' warnings that extreme heat will become more common, more extreme, and longer-lasting in the coming decades.

    That's about one-third of the current population, covering one-quarter of the US land area, as shown in the map below.

    Next year, the report projects that 8 million Americans face the prospect of sweltering in at least 125 degrees Fahrenheit for at least one day. By 2053, that would rise to 107 million Americans — 13 times more people in just 30 years, according to the report.


    Counties where at least one day is expected to breach 125 degrees Fahrenheit in 2023 (left) and 2053 (right).

    The majority of that extreme heat is expected in the center of the country, from the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast up through Chicago — an area that First Street Foundation is calling the "extreme heat belt." Significant portions of the southwest and southeast are also likely to have more than one day above 125 degrees Fahrenheit in 2053, according to the report.

    At such high temperatures, the National Weather Service warns that risk of heat stroke is high. Infrastructure often fails at such high temperatures, too. Roads buckle, train tracks bend and can cause derailing, and airport tarmacs can melt and prevent takeoff. Sometimes the power even goes out.

    Days that breach 125 degrees Fahrenheit aren't the only ones to worry about. Even temperatures above 100 degrees can be dangerous. In another map, below, the report projects more days above 100 degrees across the southern half of the country.


    Circles represent days above 100 degrees Fahrenheit in 2023 (left) and 2053 (right). Darker colors indicate a greater number of days, while the sizes of the circles represent the number of properties impacted.

    The extreme heat of the summer so far in 2020 lines up with many of the locations where First Street Foundation expects the most heat in years to come, Eby said.

    For example, as the map below shows, the report projects more heat waves across the country, with significantly increased risk in northern areas including the Pacific Northwest, and other regions that aren't historically accustomed to extreme heat.


    The county-by-county probability of a heat wave — three consecutive days above the 98th percentile for the local area — in 2023 (left) and 2053 (right).

    The projections in this report are conservative, since it assumed a future scenario where humans drastically cut the greenhouse-gas emissions that are driving climate change and increasing global temperatures.

    If the world doesn't cut emissions soon — particularly through a rapid transition away from fossil fuels to clean energy — the future of extreme heat could look even worse than the maps in this report.


    "If anything, our undercuts or our underrepresentation of these heat impacts will be noticed in 30 years," Eby said.

    Even if humans stop emitting greenhouse gases tomorrow, some heating is locked in by the gases we've already added to the atmosphere. To protect life, infrastructure, and property, Eby said, individuals and companies and governments have to prepare for more extreme heat in the future.

    "Our hope is that this data can inform everyone from the individual, to commercial users to state, local and federal governments, which are all users of our data," he said.

    Their data is publicly available on riskfactor.com, where you can check past data, as well as current and future risks for individual properties.
    Is adding gulf moisture to that going to create the need to add F6 to the Fugita tornado scale?
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  18. #918
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    Oct 2003
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    25,078
    Looks like it only barely squeaked below 70 last night at the official recording site at Sea-Tac. That's extremely rare here in Seattle where overnight lows tend to be in the 50s even during the hottest part of the year. It feels just plain muggy outside right now. Yuck.

    [edit] Just saw this tweet from NWS Seattle:
    Low temperature in Seattle through 5 AM this morning has been 71 degrees F.

    Number of days in Seattle's climate record with low temperatures at or above 70 degrees: 2.
    Last edited by The AD; 08-18-2022 at 08:41 AM.

  19. #919
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    In a van... down by the river
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    10,299
    Ahhh... local Wx reported 52F when I woke up this morning. 62F in the house. Should get through the rest of the summer sans A/C, Flying Spaghetti Monster willing.

  20. #920
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    in a box on the porch
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    Quote Originally Posted by Core Shot View Post
    What kind of box on a porch is it?
    Just cardboard? Or have you upgraded to a wooden crate?
    See Schrodinger, troglodyte.


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  21. #921
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    livin the dream
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    5,133
    Quote Originally Posted by The AD View Post
    Looks like it only barely squeaked below 70 last night at the official recording site at Sea-Tac. That's extremely rare here in Seattle where overnight lows tend to be in the 50s even during the hottest part of the year. It feels just plain muggy outside right now. Yuck.

    [edit] Just saw this tweet from NWS Seattle:
    During my 5am commute this morning I had the AC on in the truck.


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    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
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    Squaw Valley, USA

  22. #922
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    I can still smell Poutine.
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    19,697
    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    During my 5am commute this morning I had the AC on in the truck.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Shit. Living somewhere that that is reality is a hard no for me. Of course that's gonna be everywhere on Earth soon enough.

  23. #923
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
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    21,442
    Quote Originally Posted by The AD View Post
    Looks like it only barely squeaked below 70 last night at the official recording site at Sea-Tac. That's extremely rare here in Seattle where overnight lows tend to be in the 50s even during the hottest part of the year. It feels just plain muggy outside right now. Yuck.

    [edit] Just saw this tweet from NWS Seattle:
    My Zoom yoga instructor (8 Limbs Yoga out of Seattle) was complaining about how hot it was for our 7am class. It was a chill 70 here in W2 and quite enjoyable but our high is suppose to be 105 again. AC is already running. Currently 86 degrees.
    When you see something that is not right, not just, not fair, you have a moral obligation to say something. To do something." Rep. John Lewis


    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  24. #924
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post
    My Zoom yoga instructor (8 Limbs Yoga out of Seattle) was complaining about how hot it was for our 7am class. It was a chill 70 here in W2 and quite enjoyable but our high is suppose to be 105 again. AC is already running. Currently 86 degrees.
    Are they the ones renting your spare place??
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  25. #925
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    2,051
    I would just like to let you all know that when I tell my neighbors "it's hotter than a whore house on nickel night," they all laugh. Got any more of these sayings?

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