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  1. #51
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    9

    Ozark Trail

    I totally see the logic in not picking up a bottom-of-the-barrel Ozark Trail tent. It'd be nice to have a tent that lasts more than a season.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Posts
    7
    Coleman is still my favorite brand, but leaving aside preferences, there are other companies that are worth it with all-season tents, Big Agnes and Kodiak to name a few. You can compare a few options here https://popular.reviews/best-4-season-tent/

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Aspen
    Posts
    8,414
    I camped with the fam last night in a Big Agnes Big House 6. The temp went down to 40 deg and holy crap was it an icebox in there. On the flip side, I'm sure it'd be awesome on a 65 degree night in the desert. Otherwise the tent worked great. The fly however wouldn't do much to stop rain from coming in the front door.

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    7,275
    Just ordered this blackout tent

    Not a fan of a partial rain fly though.

    https://www.dickssportinggoods.com/p...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

    Iíve used my 8 person Coleman tent the last 12 years and still works great.

    Now with a family Iím tired of the 4:30am wake up from the PNW summer sunrise so will give this a try.


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  5. #55
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    7,275
    Tent just arrived. Thing is nice. 12ft by 10ft and pretty dam dark inside which will be nice. Click image for larger version. 

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    Pretty easy set up too.


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  6. #56
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Aloft
    Posts
    3,842
    Those blackout tents are nice. Slept in one that had an "aluminized" outer fabric on a volcano in Indonesia. Kept it like 10-15į cooler inside and damn near didn't wake up until 11am. Dark as shit and noticeably cooler than a regular tent.

    I wanted one bad after that, but would almost be too dangerous on those drunk car camping trips. Would probably end up sleeping all day, ha.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    7,275
    Yea. In the PNW the fucking sun rises at like 4:30-5 and car camping with my 5 yr old she is up with the sun, hopefully this buys us another hour of sleep maybe. Iíd normally wear an eye mask with my other tent.

    Now if i could find a way to shut the Blue Jays up. Usually they are pillaging some idiot car camping neighbor site that left trash out.




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  8. #58
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Imaginationland
    Posts
    3,951
    Quote Originally Posted by Soups View Post
    Those blackout tents are nice. Slept in one that had an "aluminized" outer fabric on a volcano in Indonesia. Kept it like 10-15į cooler inside and damn near didn't wake up until 11am. Dark as shit and noticeably cooler than a regular tent.

    I wanted one bad after that, but would almost be too dangerous on those drunk car camping trips. Would probably end up sleeping all day, ha.
    Struggling to see a problem with sleeping off a bender.

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Moose, Iowa
    Posts
    6,790
    Quote Originally Posted by AK47bp View Post
    Yea. In the PNW the fucking sun rises at like 4:30-5 and car camping with my 5 yr old she is up with the sun, hopefully this buys us another hour of sleep maybe. I’d normally wear an eye mask with my other tent.

    Now if i could find a way to shut the Blue Jays up. Usually they are pillaging some idiot car camping neighbor site that left trash out.




    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    My recent trip to ski Beartooth we brought the old Marmot 8 for just the two of us because my daughter likes to have her own room. Everyday like clockwork I was wide awake at 4:45 am. Go outside take a pee and walk around for a few minutes. Back inside and sleep till 730.

    Blackout tents look cool if I didn't already have a pile of tents in the basement. Three car camping tents (REI4, marmot8, Eureka3), 3 backpacking tents (Rei4, Walrus2, North Face 2), one 4 seasons North Face I inherited from my sister.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  10. #60
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Posts
    1
    Large Decathlon pop up job for car duties here.
    Big porch and two sleeping areas. Propper black out tent as well.
    Takes about 5 minutes to throw up and peg out.
    Takes about 10 to get folded up if you follow the instructions.
    In a side by side test it was much quicker up and down than the folks next to us berghaus airbeam job.
    Was bought for summer in the Alps and even survived some storms that came in. I was impressed with it.

    PS. I can't create new topic, but I need advice.
    Looking for small backpack that is for travel first and a camera second. I really like the Peak Design Everyday, but it's just too much for me. Manfrotto has a couple bags that come close, but they just don't look all that sturdy and don't get many high reviews.

  11. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Warm parts of the St. Vrain
    Posts
    1,850

    Car camping tent suggestions

    My buddy is road tripping from FL to CA and all around CA with a kingdom 6 for just him.

    I helped him set it up a few weekends ago. Itís hudge and totally heavy. Comes with shoulder straps on the carrying case. It probably takes up 35l or so stowed. Set up, you can easily stand in it. The shape allows the walls to be rather vertical so increasing useable headroom. At least one of the poles relies on a sleeve sewn to the body (the others are the clip type) which I didnít like but it looked like it was maybe the best choice for the middle pole. The vestibule sold separately is big enough to park a bike in or sit two people in chairs. Has doors on both sides and caps one end. Itís easy to put the fly on backwards (back to front) so watch that.

    The privacy wall goes up pretty easily and either makes a second smaller sleeping area or an extended porch/vestibule. Fly seemed like it was reasonably vented and the tent had a fair amount of mesh body. The large windows on the end arenít covered much when you donít have the vestibule so it might be a bit harder to ventilate if itís raining. OTOH it is reported by my bud as quite water proof and the design would back that up as there are only front and back window/door and the fly is robust and Goes low to the ground. It could be set up by one person but two is better. Two peeps would still take a little while, like I dunno, 7 or 8 minutes and another 4 to 5 with the rather complex vestibule. Definitely a tent Iíd practice with first.

    Wind with such a tall light tent is a concern for sure but It has multiple extra guy out points. IIRC it has about 16 of them one high and one low per pole. If it were mine Iíd get extra stakes and pre rig a few guy lines but whatever. The guy points are there and you will of course have brought extra cordage. Lawson plug.

    Heís usually camping with his kid so the space makes sense for the hassle. But it is a handful.


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    If we're gonna wear uniforms, we should all wear somethin' different!

  12. #62
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    livin the dream
    Posts
    4,331
    Quote Originally Posted by Jong Lafitte View Post
    My buddy is road tripping from FL to CA and all around CA with a kingdom 6 for just him.

    I helped him set it up a few weekends ago. Itís hudge and totally heavy. Comes with shoulder straps on the carrying case. It probably takes up 35l or so stowed. Set up, you can easily stand in it. The shape allows the walls to be rather vertical so increasing useable headroom. At least one of the poles relies on a sleeve sewn to the body (the others are the clip type) which I didnít like but it looked like it was maybe the best choice for the middle pole. The vestibule sold separately is big enough to park a bike in or sit two people in chairs. Has doors on both sides and caps one end. Itís easy to put the fly on backwards (back to front) so watch that.

    The privacy wall goes up pretty easily and either makes a second smaller sleeping area or an extended porch/vestibule. Fly seemed like it was reasonably vented and the tent had a fair amount of mesh body. The large windows on the end arenít covered much when you donít have the vestibule so it might be a bit harder to ventilate if itís raining. OTOH it is reported by my bud as quite water proof and the design would back that up as there are only front and back window/door and the fly is robust and Goes low to the ground. It could be set up by one person but two is better. Two peeps would still take a little while, like I dunno, 7 or 8 minutes and another 4 to 5 with the rather complex vestibule. Definitely a tent Iíd practice with first.

    Wind with such a tall light tent is a concern for sure but It has multiple extra guy out points. IIRC it has about 16 of them one high and one low per pole. If it were mine Iíd get extra stakes and pre rig a few guy lines but whatever. The guy points are there and you will of course have brought extra cordage. Lawson plug.

    Heís usually camping with his kid so the space makes sense for the hassle. But it is a handful.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Iíve posted in this thread previously... but Iíll add to this.

    I have the Kingdom 4 - so same design just smaller, no ďprivacy wallĒ - seems to me like the right buy out the kingdom lineup. Roomy for me, the wife, and the dog. Big enough you could set a small table and chairs up inside to use as a family room to wait out a storm. Tall enough that my 6í2 frame can change standing up. The 6 is crazy big, the 8 is insane. Itís possible to setup the 4 solo, but itís a major PITA. Two people makes it quick work.

    Itís been great in PNW rain. But as JL mentioned, wind is a challenge for this thing. If there is any chance of wind, you have to set it up with the vestibule facing the wind to make it as aerodynamic as possible, then guy it structurally - meaning not just guying the fly out; but under the fly, guying the tent stable by tying to the poles mid height and staking them out. One really bad wind storm bent the poles of my tent, it still works fine, I just have to be conscious of it... I guess thatís the price you pay for having a tent tall enough for me to stand up in....


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    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  13. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    livin the dream
    Posts
    4,331
    Whatís the fabric that makes these blackout tents? Hopefully rei makes an aftermarket fly for the kingdom to add that, sounds nice... or maybe you can buy a tarp of it and modify your tent accordingly...


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    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  14. #64
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Wallstrasse 28, Hessen, 35321, Laubach, Germany
    Posts
    54
    We are using eureka tent. My wife bought it last summer.

  15. #65
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Stumptown
    Posts
    6,608
    Grabbed an REI Grand Hut 6 the other day. This thing is super nice. Not as big as the Kingdom but tons of room and I can stand up in it. Goes up easily with one person, too.

    Canít speak to how it holds up in the wind, but I doubt itís much better than the kingdom.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  16. #66
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    lost
    Posts
    1,072
    How about a simple winter friendly small camper trailer? I'm looking for a trailer with high clearance, is light/sturdy, winter ready, and can sleep at least 2 adults/1 infant comfortably (think 4x4 teardrop). Anyone have a favorite?

    < 1000lbs, insulated, 4+ 120V outlets, generator friendly, full galley build out option, headroom, etc. Any tips, recs, etc. are appreciated in advance.

  17. #67
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    32,884
    This should be the end-all to any questions about the best car camping setup.



    https://shiftpod.com/shiftpod/

  18. #68
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    SLC, Utah
    Posts
    1,797
    Quote Originally Posted by splat View Post
    This should be the end-all to any questions about the best car camping setup.



    https://shiftpod.com/shiftpod/
    we found the burner

  19. #69
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wasatch Back: 7000'
    Posts
    10,903
    I'm thinking of buying a pop-up camper. Talk me out of it. There is a lot to like and a lot not to like about them. Bottom line is whether they really offer anything significant over and above my tent. Sure, I will get a more comfortable bed, and a better night's sleep, a sink and indoor stove/hot plate, but it seems that nice ones go for between $11k-15k. Anyone using one?
    ďA society that puts equality before freedom will get neither. A society that puts freedom before equality will get a high degree of both.Ē
    ― Milton Friedman

  20. #70
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Last Best City in the Last Best Place
    Posts
    4,124
    You mean like a popup tent trailer, or a truck camper?

  21. #71
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wasatch Back: 7000'
    Posts
    10,903
    Pop up tent trailer. Like a forest river
    ďA society that puts equality before freedom will get neither. A society that puts freedom before equality will get a high degree of both.Ē
    ― Milton Friedman

  22. #72
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    In a van... down by the river
    Posts
    6,873
    Quote Originally Posted by schindlerpiste View Post
    Pop up tent trailer. Like a forest river
    Had a buddy that bought one, hated it, and sold it all in one season.

  23. #73
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    17,841
    We had two pop-up trailers before moving to a truck camper.

    Pros: easy towing, lots of room inside, lots of ventilation, nice to have a sink, fridge, etc. Good place to gather inside in warm buggy or rainy weather.

    Cons: 30-45 min setup or breakdown, difficult to access inside when roof down (to store stuff), if it's cold weather these are very difficult to keep heated.

    The setup/ breakdown time is what got us away from them. Just too much hassle.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  24. #74
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Last Best City in the Last Best Place
    Posts
    4,124
    ^^ This is fairly close to my experience. We had one for two years after selling our 20 foot class C RV, and used it quite a bit. The heater cranked so it wasn't hard to keep warm. Also had heated mattresses which could only be used if we were plugged in, but they were nice. So easy to tow you hardly know it's back there.

    Half hour setup does get old. Honestly the thing that most made me go back to a hardshell was the inability of the tent to keep noise out. Plus if you're camping in sketchy areas the popup offers no real security. Now we have a 20 foot hardside trailer and I like it. Fact about campers though is that no rig is perfect for every situation.

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