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  1. #101
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Scralpine Ghettos, Ca
    Posts
    84
    huckwheat, thanks for posting all the pict.s, and thanks for the email!

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    603
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by Huckwheat View Post
    Looking for some Palisades trivia here:
    --Oldest person to ever ski Chimney?
    I did it & I’m old. Well, I'm old now...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    With the snow you have now, I'd do it again.

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Reno
    Posts
    2,421
    Bumping this with Gopher's write up......thought it was great.

    http://unofficialnetworks.com/chimne...#comment-58394

    The Chimney is a generator of fear within the few skiers who have the knowledge to attempt it. At no time do you feel entirely confident that you will emerge unscathed. The unknown element perpetually exists; tapping your temporal lobe. Standing on top of the Chimney, you look directly into that unknown.

    How big is the initial cornice air in? How hard will the chute be? How fast will I be going off the second take off? Will I keep it together in the air? How IS that landing today? The run out…should I just point it or try to make turns?

    These questions swim and froth and crawl over one another inside your brains as you stand atop looking down into what will soon be the most intense moment of your season. When confidence in the conditions quells the question’s agitation, a calmness arrives.

    It’s within this window of tranquility that you make you decision. A deep breath. Another. An excitement builds as the adrenal glads receive stimulation and the heart rate accelerates. It’s now. Your life is now. A fire builds inside and overflows as a savage yell and a hard clanking of ski poles.

    This is where you have to be to drop in. Once you’ve gotten there, it’s over. You’ve made your decision to enter and the following incoming sensory information is never processed.

    The initial cornice air never happens. The chute’s hardness goes undetected. Your speed upon the second take off isn’t registered. Your position in the air is unimportant. The landing’s condition is nebulous. You only come to once you are bounding down the runout.

    At the bottom, you look up and see tracks. A moment is spent delving thru your brain in search of a memory that matches the observed marks in the snow. You won’t find it. You’ll just find an external smile and a comfortable feeling of accomplishment.
    Donjoy to the World!

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tahoe City
    Posts
    626
    awesome write up, I backed out of it last week and it's been haunting me, a little.
    Like I told my last wife, I never drive faster than I can see, besides it's all in the reflexes.

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tahoe
    Posts
    93

    oldest, a dubious distinction

    Quote Originally Posted by jahroy View Post
    i was on the chair with a guy in 2006 who said he skied it on his 59th birthday...

    i owe that guy some thanks... i skied it later that week on my 29th birthday. he definitely helped convince me i needed to.

    cheryl definitely ripped it in 06, but she was not in her late 50s. as gentlemen we shouldn't be discussing her age anyways
    I was up there in 2006 when Kevin (jolly, pink faced big wall climber ripper skier in his 50s) was greeting everyone and drumming up a real party spirit. He asked my age and declared that I was the oldest (58) to ski it. In any case, a dubious distinction. there is a picture of the run thanks to Jim B.

  6. #106
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    ...big fog
    Posts
    755
    Quote Originally Posted by Huckwheat View Post
    Bumping this with Gopher's write up......thought it was great.

    http://unofficialnetworks.com/chimne...#comment-58394

    The Chimney is a generator of fear within the few skiers who have the knowledge to attempt it. At no time do you feel entirely confident that you will emerge unscathed. The unknown element perpetually exists; tapping your temporal lobe. Standing on top of the Chimney, you look directly into that unknown.

    How big is the initial cornice air in? How hard will the chute be? How fast will I be going off the second take off? Will I keep it together in the air? How IS that landing today? The run out…should I just point it or try to make turns?

    These questions swim and froth and crawl over one another inside your brains as you stand atop looking down into what will soon be the most intense moment of your season. When confidence in the conditions quells the question’s agitation, a calmness arrives.

    It’s within this window of tranquility that you make you decision. A deep breath. Another. An excitement builds as the adrenal glads receive stimulation and the heart rate accelerates. It’s now. Your life is now. A fire builds inside and overflows as a savage yell and a hard clanking of ski poles.

    This is where you have to be to drop in. Once you’ve gotten there, it’s over. You’ve made your decision to enter and the following incoming sensory information is never processed.

    The initial cornice air never happens. The chute’s hardness goes undetected. Your speed upon the second take off isn’t registered. Your position in the air is unimportant. The landing’s condition is nebulous. You only come to once you are bounding down the runout.

    At the bottom, you look up and see tracks. A moment is spent delving thru your brain in search of a memory that matches the observed marks in the snow. You won’t find it. You’ll just find an external smile and a comfortable feeling of accomplishment.
    NICE!
    was checking this on unofficial and that last two paragraphs is pretty right on with how i remember my experience the first time in chimney. "another please" is what i told my patroller buddy, after a full five minutes on top of said cornice deliberating with my nutsack. Anywho-wife started looking over my shoulder and i explained my nostalgia, showed her a POV. she told me i was crazy and that under no circumstances am i to encourage my kids to do shit like that. i told her that is just not possible. HA!
    one step forward, no step backward

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Reno
    Posts
    2,421
    Quote Originally Posted by allTandA View Post
    she told me i was crazy and that under no circumstances am i to encourage my kids to do shit like that. i told her that is just not possible. HA!
    Ha, good point.....yes someone has to dig very deep and make a decision like that on their own.

    I have kids now too (1 and 4, boys). It makes us think different about Squaw skiing (for the kids).....I want the boys to learn to love skiing, but there shouldnt be pressure to be "rad"......when i was in high school a heli in the bumps was a big thing, not the fingers. I was in college before I started legitimately dangerous stuff.

    The kids make me think different about Chimney now too (or maybe I am just old (mentally))......in recent years I am pretty happy running the tube, or a little air into extra.....I usually look at chimney and remince a minute and keep going.
    Donjoy to the World!

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Incline Village, NV (Tahoe)
    Posts
    5,489
    You're smart.
    Every man dies. Not every man lives.
    You don’t stop playing because you grow old; you grow old because you stop playing.

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Reno
    Posts
    2,421
    Well, despite the meager 2014 Ski Season, mother nature finally gave one worthy Palisades day.

    April 2!!















    And on April 4 a few guys pulled off the Chimney Sweep!
    Donjoy to the World!

  10. #110
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Reno
    Posts
    2,421
    April 8, 2015

    Interesting Palisades day in this pathetic snow year.
    --Without Headwall running (due to low snow at the bottom), Reverse Traverse was open.....preventing Palisades from opening.
    --Finally at 2PM Patrol closed R.T. and opened Palisades.
    --Due to multiple wicked traverse lines, you had to point your lines and then quickly shed speed before traverse tracks.
    --The lines were steep (Extra) and big (Box), due to low snow.....that made it fun.







    Last edited by Huckwheat; 04-09-2015 at 11:45 AM.
    Donjoy to the World!

  11. #111
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SF & the Ho
    Posts
    5,775
    Some very spicy and steep lines. Was impressed that chimney was claimed w the thin snow year.

  12. #112
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Reno
    Posts
    2,421
    PSA - I fixed all the broken photos links in the first post.....going back to 2005, wow.
    Donjoy to the World!

  13. #113
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Reno
    Posts
    2,421
    [QUOTE=huckasoreass;1359946]
    Quote Originally Posted by Huckwheat View Post
    Plus here is his kids room.


    That, right there, is awesome. Really tough snow year below 8,400' feet or so, though. Considering the vantage appears to be just a little above Gold Coast, if animals are frollicking in the grasses around Newport chair, you know KT must be bone dry. Bummer.

    Actually, taking a second look, that straight on angle is more like from High Camp or the top of Bailey's. Still, the Fingers are bare rock.
    I think Huckasoreass's assessment of this painting describes Spring 2015.
    Donjoy to the World!

  14. #114
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Central Valley
    Posts
    2,956
    Love when this thread pops up. Thanks Huckwheat.

  15. #115
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,807
    Fantastic pics, thanks.

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