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  1. #4976
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    Quote Originally Posted by TahoeJ View Post
    Just to be clear, “I could give a fuck” was used properly. As opposed to someone saying I could care less.
    Read his linked reply. Technically it’s incorrect but it’s been used that way so much that’s it’s accepted.

    EDIT: Unless you were just agreeing with me that yes, based on his behavior, he could and clearly does give a fuck?
    Last edited by bennymac; 06-16-2021 at 09:52 PM.

  2. #4977
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    Imagine if Warren Buffet said, "I have money on the line so I don't like hearing what other people have to say about my investments."


    Quote Originally Posted by shera View Post
    I haven't use tether very often and honestly I think it's shady.


    When you said that it piqued my interest. You are very much into crypto and yet you think it is shady - why? What do you know about Tether? How do you use it and how do you avoid it?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-whuXHSL1Pg

    What are your thoughts about that video?

    I thank people when they share "FUD" with me. Agree or not, these concerns can't be just brushed under the rug. People with the most at risk simply want to know the truth.

    And now an intermission. This song could be the perfect crypto duet. Actually written by Benny (from Abba) As much as I love AC/DC, Van Halen and Iron Maiden ... this duet rocks.

    Nothing is so good it last eternally
    Perfect situations must go wrong
    But this has never yet prevented me
    Wanting far too much for far too long
    Looking back I could have played it differently

    OH, MY GAWD! ―John Hillerman   Big Billie Eilish fan.   This, my fellow chickens, is how I’d create the perfect crypto machinery ― doomberg   Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect. ― Mark Twain

  3. #4978
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    Quote Originally Posted by puregravity View Post
    Imagine if Warren Buffet said, "I have money on the line so I don't like hearing what other people have to say about my investments."






    When you said that it piqued my interest. You are very much into crypto and yet you think it is shady - why? What do you know about Tether? How do you use it and how do you avoid it?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-whuXHSL1Pg

    What are your thoughts about that video?

    I thank people when they share "FUD" with me. Agree or not, these concerns can't be just brushed under the rug. People with the most at risk simply want to know the truth.

    And now an intermission. This song could be the perfect crypto duet. Actually written by Benny (from Abba) As much as I love AC/DC, Van Halen and Iron Maiden ... this duet rocks.

    Nothing is so good it last eternally
    Perfect situations must go wrong
    But this has never yet prevented me
    Wanting far too much for far too long
    Looking back I could have played it differently

    A difference of opinion on facts is one thing. However you post made up BS.

    NY would've nailed Paolo's balls to the wall if they had a real case. There is no way they would've settled, much less continued to let Tether operate, if they could've convicted them. But go on and keep posting anon accounts Bitfinnex'd and Trolly McTrollface as valid sources.



    Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk

  4. #4979
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    You know as much about tether as I do, I'm sure. No point trying to engage me on that.

    I'm here (mostly) for bitcoin, there's no good reason for me to add more risk. I also made some decisions related to being a USA resident - for instance I use Coinbase, not Binance. I use USDC, not tether, to transfer USD value. It's not rocket science, I'm just trying to be conservative out here in the wild west. ymmv nfa dyor etc

    The reason I wanted to post here is just to reiterate that I am still bullish in this cycle. Here is some confirmation bias to that end (Fibonacci level related). It basically shows that each cycle has had a big pullback to the 1.618 fib level measured from the top to bottom of the previous cycle. Pretty slick.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1618.jpg 
Views:	27 
Size:	153.0 KB 
ID:	377317
    (Always keep in mind that you're looking at a log chart which stretches the bottom and compresses the top)
    source: https://twitter.com/misconfig_exe/st...52683431178240
    Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each.
    Henry David Thoreau

  5. #4980
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    Quote Originally Posted by TahoeJ View Post
    Just to be clear, “I could give a fuck” was used properly. As opposed to someone saying I could care less.
    Just to be clear, you’re wrong. I’m sure you know the old phrase “couldn’t give a damn”, for example. Phrases like DGAF are all logical variations on this. ‘I give zero fucks’ also expresses the idea of ‘I couldn’t give a fuck’. As does ‘couldn’t care less’.

    Anyway, I doubt any of us truly give a fuck or damn about the trend toward people saying ‘I could give a fuck’ when they mean the opposite.

  6. #4981
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    Quote Originally Posted by frorider View Post
    Just to be clear, you’re wrong. I’m sure you know the old phrase “couldn’t give a damn”, for example. Phrases like DGAF are all logical variations on this. ‘I give zero fucks’ also expresses the idea of ‘I couldn’t give a fuck’. As does ‘couldn’t care less’.

    Anyway, I doubt any of us truly give a fuck or damn about the trend toward people saying ‘I could give a fuck’ when they mean the opposite.
    Are you this petty IRL? Jesus.

    Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk

  7. #4982
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    Quote Originally Posted by shera View Post
    You know as much about tether as I do, I'm sure. No point trying to engage me on that.

    I'm here (mostly) for bitcoin, there's no good reason for me to add more risk. I also made some decisions related to being a USA resident - for instance I use Coinbase, not Binance. I use USDC, not tether, to transfer USD value. It's not rocket science, I'm just trying to be conservative out here in the wild west. ymmv nfa dyor etc

    The reason I wanted to post here is just to reiterate that I am still bullish in this cycle. Here is some confirmation bias to that end (Fibonacci level related). It basically shows that each cycle has had a big pullback to the 1.618 fib level measured from the top to bottom of the previous cycle. Pretty slick.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1618.jpg 
Views:	27 
Size:	153.0 KB 
ID:	377317
    (Always keep in mind that you're looking at a log chart which stretches the bottom and compresses the top)
    source: https://twitter.com/misconfig_exe/st...52683431178240
    This video is excellent for looking at the big picture perspective. Gotta sign up for email list but it's free and worth it.

    https://twitter.com/BobLoukas/status...188024323?s=19

    Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk

  8. #4983
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    Quote Originally Posted by frorider View Post
    Swing and a miss.

    You’ve said that this is your 401K, so I imagine most of us want it to work out for you. Maybe you should just lean in to that.
    I said that I have a 401k but I have more faith that BTC will provide me with a much better ROI over the long run.

    Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk

  9. #4984
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    I follow Bob Loukas.
    Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each.
    Henry David Thoreau

  10. #4985
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    Another mom and pop shop's take on whether crypto is 'investable.' An investable asset must meet three of the following five criteria. Bitcoin falls short in each:

    • Generate steady, reliable cash flow on a contractual basis, like bonds

    • Generate earnings through exposure to economic growth, like equities

    • Provide consistent and reliable diversification benefits to a portfolio

    • Dampen volatility

    • Provide consistent and reliable evidence of hedging inflation or deflation as a store of value


    Slidedeck Page 29: https://resources.goldman.com/conten...?sa=n&rd=n

  11. #4986
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    Quote Originally Posted by stalefish3169 View Post
    A difference of opinion on facts is one thing. However you post made up BS.

    NY would've nailed Paolo's balls to the wall if they had a real case. There is no way they would've settled, much less continued to let Tether operate, if they could've convicted them. But go on and keep posting anon accounts Bitfinnex'd and Trolly McTrollface as valid sources.
    >> However you post made up BS
    That’s rich coming from you.

    @Tr0llyTr0llFace is the coolest ever. He said Bitcoin is a Ponzi scheme before it was cool to say. And @Bitfinexed uncovered ground-breaking analysis to show what Tether and Bitfinex are about. Their claims have started a movement to greater accountability and awareness of the risks in the crypto-sphere. Luca ~STOP the FUD~ Land aka @LucaLand97 is also a great resource of FUD (facts you dislike).

    The New York Attorney General said "Bitfinex and Tether recklessly and unlawfully covered-up massive financial losses to keep their scheme going and protect their bottom lines.” They also said that “starting no later than mid-2017, Tether had no access to banking, anywhere in the world, and so for periods of time held no reserves to back tethers in circulation at the rate of one dollar for every tether, contrary to its representations."

    https://ag.ny.gov/press-release/2021...finexs-illegal

    Think about it -- the bull run in 2017/2018 wasn't backstopped by real dollars. Tether couldn't meet their obligations. It is even worse now with something like ~3% cash and the rest is highly suspect 'commercial paper' (aka junk). If it was quality paper they would have said. It is probably junk.

    Don't trust. Verify. The NYAG has jurisdiction over New York State and they have banned Tether from operating in New York State. Other government agencies will come along side soon enough. This is turning into a Madoff level scam and Tr0llyTr0llFace and Bitfinexed can be credited with uncovering this just like a few researchers did with Madoff in the years before it collapsed.

    From now on I shall be quoting the price of BTC in Tethers. When they print more Tethers it just dilutes the price of BTC. Right now 1 BTC = 39,012 Tethers.
    OH, MY GAWD! ―John Hillerman   Big Billie Eilish fan.   This, my fellow chickens, is how I’d create the perfect crypto machinery ― doomberg   Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect. ― Mark Twain

  12. #4987
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    So many people throwing around the term "Ponzi scheme" without really understanding what that means. You can call bitcoin a gimmick or whatever, but by definition it's not a Ponzi scheme... that doesn't even make sense.
    I ski 135 degree chutes switch to the road.

  13. #4988
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    One of the co-founders of COIN was on Bloomberg Technology.
    Vaporware:

    Bloomberg Studio 1.0: Coinbase Co-Founder Fred Ehrsam https://www.bloomberg.com/news/video...d-ehrsam-video

  14. #4989
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    Quote Originally Posted by TahoeJ View Post
    So many people throwing around the term "Ponzi scheme" without really understanding what that means. You can call bitcoin a gimmick or whatever, but by definition it's not a Ponzi scheme... that doesn't even make sense.
    Technically it is. Ponzi relied on Postal Reply Coupons to create a perceived arbitrage opportunity. He paid people's withdrawals using new investors funds. Both the use of coupons (Tether & USDC) and constant crypto rug-pulls and pump-n-dumps are ways that new investors funds provide liquidity for some people's realized gains. If it acts like a duck and quacks like a duck then it is a duck. People also defended Ponzi (and Madoff) both before and after it collapsed. De ja vu? Coinbase went public the day Madoff died in prison. Coincidence?

    "A Ponzi scheme is a type of fraud whereby crooks steal money from investors and mask the theft by funneling returns to clients from funds contributed by newer investors. "

    A Ponzi can't function without HODL, FOMO or BTFD.
    OH, MY GAWD! ―John Hillerman   Big Billie Eilish fan.   This, my fellow chickens, is how I’d create the perfect crypto machinery ― doomberg   Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect. ― Mark Twain

  15. #4990
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    BTC as a zero sum game:

    aN - bM - cR = 0

    a = average value of intakes, b = average value of miner profits, c = average value of redemptions
    N = new entrants, M = miners, R = Redeemers i.e. last cohort of investors

    It could also be said that BTC is a zero-sum game (with leverage even a negative sum game). Although ... that is technically incorrect because it is market priced and not an organization that carries a float. I.E At any point it time it can be said to have no float=, no balance, no assets. However it also walks like a duck and quacks like a duck. Call it a zero sum game. Call it a Ponzi. Same same.
    OH, MY GAWD! ―John Hillerman   Big Billie Eilish fan.   This, my fellow chickens, is how I’d create the perfect crypto machinery ― doomberg   Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect. ― Mark Twain

  16. #4991
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    Quote Originally Posted by puregravity View Post
    >> However you post made up BS
    That’s rich coming from you.

    @Tr0llyTr0llFace is the coolest ever. He said Bitcoin is a Ponzi scheme before it was cool to say. And @Bitfinexed uncovered ground-breaking analysis to show what Tether and Bitfinex are about. Their claims have started a movement to greater accountability and awareness of the risks in the crypto-sphere. Luca ~STOP the FUD~ Land aka @LucaLand97 is also a great resource of FUD (facts you dislike).

    The New York Attorney General said "Bitfinex and Tether recklessly and unlawfully covered-up massive financial losses to keep their scheme going and protect their bottom lines.” They also said that “starting no later than mid-2017, Tether had no access to banking, anywhere in the world, and so for periods of time held no reserves to back tethers in circulation at the rate of one dollar for every tether, contrary to its representations."

    https://ag.ny.gov/press-release/2021...finexs-illegal

    Think about it -- the bull run in 2017/2018 wasn't backstopped by real dollars. Tether couldn't meet their obligations. It is even worse now with something like ~3% cash and the rest is highly suspect 'commercial paper' (aka junk). If it was quality paper they would have said. It is probably junk.

    Don't trust. Verify. The NYAG has jurisdiction over New York State and they have banned Tether from operating in New York State. Other government agencies will come along side soon enough. This is turning into a Madoff level scam and Tr0llyTr0llFace and Bitfinexed can be credited with uncovering this just like a few researchers did with Madoff in the years before it collapsed.

    From now on I shall be quoting the price of BTC in Tethers. When they print more Tethers it just dilutes the price of BTC. Right now 1 BTC = 39,012 Tethers.
    So like 39,012 dollars above your BTC price prediction. Clown.

    As the epicenter of TradFi is in NY, they have the most to lose when crypto inevitably makes their cash cow go extinct. You're naive af if you don't think the old money controls the regulators. If they didn't, Lloyd Blankfein and friends would've gone to the slammer for their role in the 2008 crisis.

    Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk

  17. #4992
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    Quote Originally Posted by stalefish3169 View Post
    Are you this petty IRL? Jesus.

    Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
    Some of us have been sending you repeated signals that our posts here are classic TGR tongue in cheek. You seem to take everything in this thread very personally. I literally spelled out to you in my post that none of us actually care about your incorrect use of language, but that part of my post sailed right by you. Maybe it’s because I don’t take the TGRz very seriously or earnestly, but puregravity’s posts in this thread come across as world-weary but lighthearted, and not argumentative. However he seems to get under your skin, so maybe I’m just misreading his chillness.

    :shrug:

  18. #4993
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    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  19. #4994
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    Quote Originally Posted by puregravity View Post
    Technically it is. Ponzi relied on Postal Reply Coupons to create a perceived arbitrage opportunity. He paid people's withdrawals using new investors funds. Both the use of coupons (Tether & USDC) and constant crypto rug-pulls and pump-n-dumps are ways that new investors funds provide liquidity for some people's realized gains. If it acts like a duck and quacks like a duck then it is a duck. People also defended Ponzi (and Madoff) both before and after it collapsed. De ja vu? Coinbase went public the day Madoff died in prison. Coincidence?

    "A Ponzi scheme is a type of fraud whereby crooks steal money from investors and mask the theft by funneling returns to clients from funds contributed by newer investors. "

    A Ponzi can't function without HODL, FOMO or BTFD.
    Okay, I'm now finding you even more comical than the true crypto believers...
    I ski 135 degree chutes switch to the road.

  20. #4995
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    I bet Cuban would rather have Bitcoin than bananas now.

    Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk

  21. #4996
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    I said that I have a 401k but I have more faith that BTC will provide me with a much better ROI over the long run.
    Aren't you in your mid-30s? I am sure you are well aware of the power of compounding and all that mumbo jumbo and maybe you are right, you will know in about 30 years. It doesn't sound like you are cashing out your 401K and putting it all on black but going by historical averages you may be wrong.

    ETA:

    Bitcoin miners exit China, beat a path to the U.S. as crypto climate shifts

    June 17, 2021 at 3:00 a.m. MDT

    Jiang Zhuoer became a multimillionaire a few years ago by operating some of the most lucrative mines in China. His commodity? Bitcoin.

    Jiang had about 300,000 computers humming around-the-clock in 20 specially ventilated warehouses across remote northern China, guzzling enough electricity to power a small city. The sophisticated machines cost hundreds of millions of dollars. The digital currency they minted was worth even more.

    Today, Jiang, a fast-talking 36-year-old, is winding down in China. He and several Chinese investors — some who became billionaires off bitcoin mining — are considering shipping their equipment to Texas and Tennessee.

    China’s bitcoin moguls are coming to America.

    For years, Chinese miners like Jiang were enabled by the glut of cheap — and often dirty — electricity in China, where a massive fleet of coal-fired plants and hydroelectric dams fueled the country’s rise into an industrial behemoth. At their height in 2018, China’s bitcoin prospectors accounted for 74 percent of the world’s bitcoin production.

    White House reviews ‘gaps’ in cryptocurrency rules as bitcoin swings wildly

    But this year, Chinese authorities are cracking down on cryptocurrency to dial back energy consumption and meet their climate goals, sending miners scattering. And increasingly, miners are decamping for places like Texas, South Dakota or Canada, launching a mass migration with implications for the evolving industry and the new communities that will house it.

    Jiang recently pulled tens of thousands of his machines out of Chinese regions including Inner Mongolia, which has not only banned mining but encouraged citizens to call a government office to report illicit mining.

    “You know they’re getting serious,” Jiang said, “when they set up snitching hotlines.”

    Elsewhere in China, the Xinjiang region and three major provinces — Qinghai, Yunnan and Sichuan — have also banned cryptocurrency production.

    On May 21, top economic officials in Beijing pledged to “crack down on bitcoin mining and trading,” an announcement that sent the worldwide price of bitcoin plummeting. In recent weeks, Chinese social media users have complained that some crypto topics were being censored, while Chinese police have announced the arrests of more than 1,000 people in cryptocurrency-related financial crimes.

    That sudden chill, Chinese bitcoin miners and executives predict, will only deepen. The Chinese government has appeared uneasy not only about the industry’s carbon footprint but also the intrinsically uncontrollable, decentralized nature of cryptocurrency.

    Yemu Xu, the co-founder of Bella Protocol, a cryptocurrency banking service provider, said Chinese miners who see the writing on the wall have been trying for years to migrate to countries such as Iran and Kazakhstan to cut costs. In the past year, interest has grown in countries that have not only cheap power but also “stable political regimes, mature regulation and better policy support.”

    “As a result, mining in countries like the U.S. and Canada have been picking up,” he said.

    But the arrival of industrial-scale mining in U.S. communities could raise the same thorny questions about the technology’s environmental impact that have vexed officials in China.

    Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences this year predicted China’s bitcoin mining industry by 2024 could consume more energy than Italy. University of Cambridge researchers estimated that bitcoin miners globally accounted for more energy use than Argentina.

    Alex de Vries, a financial economist who has long criticized bitcoin’s energy consumption, predicted the migration of China’s bitcoin miners will have repercussions.

    “You’re talking about energy demand potentially the size of a small Western country that needs to be relocated somewhere else,” he said. “It’s a massive problem to find a new home for all of these miners.”

    Earlier this year, a dispute erupted in New York state’s Finger Lakes region between local activists and a Connecticut private equity firm that had converted an old natural gas-fueled power plant into a bitcoin mine. As a result, the New York state legislature is considering a bill that would block new bitcoin mining in carbon-producing power plants.

    Other jurisdictions have taken the opposite tack. In March, coal-rich Kentucky passed a law offering tax breaks to miners that invest $1 million in installing new machines in the state.
    Advertisement

    Either way, the growth in the U.S. cryptocurrency mining industry is expected to continue as larger investment funds are drawn in, especially if bitcoin can return to its near-all-time-highs above $60,000, industry insiders say.

    “In China, miners might not have somewhere to go anymore and they’re thinking, how can I move some of my portfolio someplace else?” said Mike Colyer, chief executive of Foundry, a Rochester, N.Y.-based company that helps miners purchase tens of thousands of computers at once and assemble them in industrial locations. “But it’s not just the Chinese. Right now, everyone is scrambling to get machines plugged in.”

    Colyer said he has also helped identify and convert real estate, such as abandoned aluminum factories that have the electrical infrastructure capable of handling enormous wattages, into bitcoin farms.

    As cryptocurrency goes wild, fear grows about who might get hurt

    One Chinese miner, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he feared political repercussions in China, said he predicted 60 to 70 percent of his peers would migrate their operations to the United States or Europe. He said he is building about 50 shipping containers to house his computers to plop onto an oil field in West Texas, and is breaking ground on a 33-megawatt site in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.
    Advertisement

    “Right now in China, everybody’s scared. The question is not whether you pull out, but immediately or gradually,” the miner said. But he added that there were regulatory uncertainties in the West, too.

    “U.S. local communities don’t necessarily like bitcoin farms,” he said. “We need to be aware of that, and the environmental policy risks because the Biden administration might take a harsher stance on bitcoin.”

    Other Chinese miners have fewer compunctions about seeking new frontiers.

    Jiang ticked off a number of disadvantages to expanding in the United States: too many “environmentalists who worry about wildlife and the birds,” he said, and too much “White liberal idiocy” preoccupied with climate change — the science of which he has doubted. U.S. electricity was six times more expensive than in China, he estimated, and he would have to pay relatively high wages to I.T. staff to keep his computers purring.
    Advertisement

    Even so, Jiang said he was considering two sites in Texas and Tennessee. It seemed less risky than other places, including the Middle East, where he had operations shut down by authorities, or Russia, where his colleagues’ expensive computers have been seized by corrupt police.

    And right now, everywhere seemed a safer bet than China, where regulators can be mercurial and unforgiving.

    “A change in government policy that suddenly forces out all miners — that would never happen in America,” Jiang said. “It’s a capitalist system.”
    Last edited by Bunion 2020; Yesterday at 02:41 PM.

  22. #4997
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    Quote Originally Posted by TahoeJ View Post
    Okay, I'm now finding you even more comical than the true crypto believers...
    Tell us about these 'true crypto believers'

    “You don’t understand international postal reply coupons!”
    - investor in Mr Charles Ponzi’s trust.

    I'd agree with Tahoe if he said the shoe isn't a perfect fit. It might be akin to a soccer cleat at a golf game. Or bowling shoes at a Salsa dance. If the shoe doesn't fit, you must acquit! But the shoe fits. Please - no shoe-in jokes
    OH, MY GAWD! ―John Hillerman   Big Billie Eilish fan.   This, my fellow chickens, is how I’d create the perfect crypto machinery ― doomberg   Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect. ― Mark Twain

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