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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutash View Post

    The second time, they ran up charges as Match.com, christian mingle, a Islam dating site, and a parole search service in Texas. That must have been an interesting date
    hahaha! pure gold!

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigdude2468 View Post
    Twice I have had a problem, once when someone got my CC # and made an online purchase and once when my CC was lifted from my wallet at a local health club. In both cases I got calls from the CC company asking me about the purchases. The time they stole my card it was an American Express card. The perp had charged about $10 at a gas station and then tried to buy a flat panel TV at the local Walmart and American Express stopped the transaction. It was not a big TV about $500 so I cannot figure out how they would have known something was wrong. My Amex card has a $25,000 limit as I use it for business so it was no where close to the credit limit. They actually caught the guy because Walmart has cameras on every register, the police recognized him. He spent six months in jail unable to make bail and they gave him timed served plus a suspended sentence after he pled no contest. Six months later he was picked up for breaking and entering and once convicted on that he got a year extra as the suspened sentence was revoked. Besides the CC he stole he took a car for a joy ride.

    The CC companies are right on top of this stuff, how they figure out something is wrong it amazing.
    If you don't normally shop at walmart, its an instant stop on the card it sounds like. I got nailed last year xmas time. Sorry, both myself and my wife, lol. So we are there, buying a TV for my daughter. Just a 23" flat screen, nothing too major. We had some other crap we bought. I run my card, declined. I'm like fuck.. My phone is out in the car so i just had my wife run her's, ill figure it out later. Declined. At that point, im like fuck, they just autoblock walmart. Now we are both stuck with blocked debit cards. At that point, i was pissed off at the bank. We had to go to a banking center to get them unblocked. They wouldn't do it over the phone now that both of our are blocked. I was even more pissed off then.

    The moral of the story is you can get that block removed or add a certain amount. Banks are racial profiling Walmarts, thats all there is too it, lol.

  3. #28
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    No, they are profiling people who shop at Walmart, there is a difference.

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by cramer View Post
    If you don't normally shop at walmart, its an instant stop on the card it sounds like. I got nailed last year xmas time. Sorry, both myself and my wife, lol. So we are there, buying a TV for my daughter. Just a 23" flat screen, nothing too major. We had some other crap we bought. I run my card, declined. I'm like fuck.. My phone is out in the car so i just had my wife run her's, ill figure it out later. Declined. At that point, im like fuck, they just autoblock walmart. Now we are both stuck with blocked debit cards. At that point, i was pissed off at the bank. We had to go to a banking center to get them unblocked. They wouldn't do it over the phone now that both of our are blocked. I was even more pissed off then.

    The moral of the story is you can get that block removed or add a certain amount. Banks are racial profiling Walmarts, thats all there is too it, lol.
    If you can get a credit card get one. Stop using debit cards. If the debit card number gets stolen you need to get your money back as opposed to a credit card where you stop the charges before you pay for them. You loose the use of your money while the problem is being fixed if you use a debit card. Also, merchants pay higher fees when you use debit cards.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJSapp View Post
    That's where you may be wrong. The cc thieves used to 'ping' the cc to make sure it was good with a small charge before ramping up bigger charges.
    Thanks for the info. Makes sense.

    Quote Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post
    "I swear dad, someone must have erroneously sent this vaporizer to the house. Damn criminals."
    Large quantities of women's cosmetics. Now I have to figure out which of my sons is cross dressing.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by stalefish3169 View Post
    This is kind of crazy. An NYU prof made a deal with some hackers to see what they could grab from him.

    http://pandodaily.com/2013/10/26/i-c...is-chilling/#!

    It’s my first class of the semester at New York University. I’m discussing the evils of plagiarism and falsifying sources with 11 graduate journalism students when, without warning, my computer freezes. I fruitlessly tap on the keyboard as my laptop takes on a life of its own and reboots. Seconds later the screen flashes a message. To receive the four-digit code I need to unlock it I’ll have to dial a number with a 312 area code. Then my iPhone, set on vibrate and sitting idly on the table, beeps madly.

    I’m being hacked — and only have myself to blame.

    Two months earlier I challenged Nicholas Percoco, senior vice president of SpiderLabs, the advanced research and ethical hacking team at Trustwave, to perform a personal “pen-test,” industry-speak for “penetration test.” The idea grew out of a cover story I wrote for Forbes some 14 years earlier, when I retained a private detective to investigate me, starting with just my byline. In a week he pulled up an astonishing amount of information, everything from my social security number and mother’s maiden name to long distance phone records, including who I called and for how long, my rent, bank accounts, stock holdings, and utility bills.......
    Like most things, a skilled thief can steal it. I have a friend that does penetration tests for the government and some businesses. He said that the biggest saving grace we have is that in the US most hackers can make more or similar money legitimately than they can stealing shit. He's told me some wild stories without naming names and after the defect was fixed about failed tests to major companies.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJSapp View Post
    Yup. Call CC company, cancel the card. .....
    On another note, the only way to really combat the cc fraud issue is to get a new card number annually. As mentioned above, cc numbers are sold in large lots and slowly used by the criminal types. Remember every single time you hear on the news about someone's database getting hacked and a couple million users info was stolen? That's a couple million cc numbers that will be sold on the black market and pinged eventually. You won't know when, but you'll get hit eventually if you were part of one of those databases.

    And on this note, I don't understand why cc companies are keeping such a long duration on the cards. 3-5 years before expiration is about 4 years too long.
    If you know some of the different ways card numbers are obtained, the annual is WAY too long of a period and would not help much. You would need a 1 time use only card (and many banks offer a special one time use card number as a service for online shopping.) The reason annual will not stop fraud at all is because it only takes one time of using a card on a device like gas pump, ATM, vending machine, etc with a skimmer installed, then the number would be out there being traded online for many months. Likewise having your card leave your sight at a merchant or restaurant by a server and double swiping it- once through the restaurant point of sale equipment and a second time on say their cell phone with a scanner attached, or a number of other devices that their boss may know nothing about. 6 months or 6 days away from the card expiring can still give enough time to rack up a large number of fraudulent charges, unless the bank or credit card processor sees a pattern and flags the card like mentioned after the first 1 or 2 hits to the card.

    Any type of breaches of databases by hackers on computers with the CC data, keystroke capturing viruses or trojans on a computer being used for any financial transaction, using a public wifi or compromised network without proper protection like an encrypted VPN, computers or data storage being stolen with financial data on it that is not properly encrypted are many of the ways cyber breaches and exposure happens.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by RShea View Post
    If you know some of the different ways card numbers are obtained, the annual is WAY too long of a period and would not help much. You would need a 1 time use only card (and many banks offer a special one time use card number as a service for online shopping.) The reason annual will not stop fraud at all is because it only takes one time of using a card on a device like gas pump, ATM, vending machine, etc with a skimmer installed, then the number would be out there being traded online for many months. Likewise having your card leave your sight at a merchant or restaurant by a server and double swiping it- once through the restaurant point of sale equipment and a second time on say their cell phone with a scanner attached, or a number of other devices that their boss may know nothing about. 6 months or 6 days away from the card expiring can still give enough time to rack up a large number of fraudulent charges, unless the bank or credit card processor sees a pattern and flags the card like mentioned after the first 1 or 2 hits to the card.

    Any type of breaches of databases by hackers on computers with the CC data, keystroke capturing viruses or trojans on a computer being used for any financial transaction, using a public wifi or compromised network without proper protection like an encrypted VPN, computers or data storage being stolen with financial data on it that is not properly encrypted are many of the ways cyber breaches and exposure happens.
    When you think about it it's amazing our cc's aren't hacked more than they are. More honest people out there than the cynical amongst us would tend to believe.
    Credit card companies don't forgive fraudulent charges out of the goodness of their hearts. It's the law. Americans are fortunate in that respect--American consumers that is, since the merchant is the one that gets screwed. In Europe if a chip and PIN card is used with the correct PIN the card holder is responsible, which is why they have ship and PIN cards. Under our laws even with chip and PIN cards the cardholder would not be responsible, which is why there is no reason for the card companies to go to the expense of chip and PIN cards.
    If you wondered about the 3 digit code on the back--retailers are not allowed to keep the 3 digit code in their database, so there is some protection when a database is hacked. Doesn't do any good if the hacker is someone who has seen your card.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    In Europe if a chip and PIN card is used with the correct PIN the card holder is responsible, which is why they have ship and PIN cards. Under our laws even with chip and PIN cards the cardholder would not be responsible, which is why there is no reason for the card companies to go to the expense of chip and PIN cards.
    same up here ^^ which must be why most all cc in Canada are chipped

    I know a person who kept the pin with the card (yeah duh!) card & pin gets taken from wallet, perp withdraws a bunch of $$$, the large Canadian bank sez they are not responsible

    fortuantley the RCMP call for the surveillance tapes in the gas bar where the card was used, recognise a person known to police make the withdrawals from an ABM, they interview the perp he calves and eventually a parent repays the money
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  10. #35
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    this happened to me today... whoever's got the number isn't very smart. first purchase was for almost $1200 at Best Buy. Luckily I check my personal email daily and had two emails from my CC company. card is locked and should be receiving new one in a few days.


    I'm intrigued to know what goes on behind the scenes at these credit companies when cases are opened. I don't know how most CC fraud is carried out as far as purchases go. guessing mostly online purchases, but there have to be people loading the info onto dummy cards as well. if the latter case, in this day and age I can't imagine it being very difficult to pursue and at least have a decent shot at catching these people. surely there is data to pin point where and when the card was used, and what stores don't have cameras near check out..? with online purchases couldn't the IP be tracked?

  11. #36
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    I've always heard that it's not worth the cost for CC companies to pursue individual cases and they use the incidence of fraud to justify higher fees which they make much more money off than they lose from fraud. So...profit...

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by sirbumpsalot View Post
    I had a roommate steal a new card from me from the mail without me knowing some 20yrs ago. Guy bragged he got a new CC and started spending like crazy. Dinners out, new wheels for his car, etc. Heck we even went to Lake Havasu and he told me the drinks were on him so I started buying party buckets to his card.

    One day I was cleaning up the apt and I found some cheap motor oil in a bag so I checked it out and noticed the receipt in the bag had my name on it!!!!!!!!! WTF? Figured out quickly this was the new card I signed up for but never received.

    I gave him notice I was moving out immediately and he eagerly agreed.

    In the meantime he bought more stuff thru QVC and announced that he bought into a 'business' using his new credit card. One day he was not home and left his wallet out. I rifled thru it and found a few reciepts with my card name on it including the 'business' one for $2K. Took them and made copies and put them back.

    The day after moving out I called CC company and told them what was going on, then went and filed a police report. Total charges were ~$5K which 20yrs ago was a lot.

    Police eventually arrested him after an investigation. Found the 'business' was a scheme with a friend of his that had an old CC carbon slider and they charged the CC and split the cash. They impounded his car because of the wheels that where obtained with the CC and eventually locked him up over xmas for a month. He was let out on time served and restitution to be repaid.

    Bottom line....CC never perused, just wrote of the money as a loss, my roommate never showed up for the restitution hearing so I stopped pursuing. Heard years later from his GF at the time that she dumped him and he moved to Mexico.

    Don't count on anything happening. Guy will probably never get caught and those who pay interest on their CC will make up for the loss.
    Sick

    What world class ski town was this? Tahoe basin
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  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by east or bust View Post
    this happened to me today... whoever's got the number isn't very smart. first purchase was for almost $1200 at Best Buy. Luckily I check my personal email daily and had two emails from my CC company. card is locked and should be receiving new one in a few days.


    I'm intrigued to know what goes on behind the scenes at these credit companies when cases are opened. I don't know how most CC fraud is carried out as far as purchases go. guessing mostly online purchases, but there have to be people loading the info onto dummy cards as well. if the latter case, in this day and age I can't imagine it being very difficult to pursue and at least have a decent shot at catching these people. surely there is data to pin point where and when the card was used, and what stores don't have cameras near check out..? with online purchases couldn't the IP be tracked?
    They just eat it and move on extending more credit
    Zone Controller

    "He wants to be a pro, bro, not some schmuck." - Hugh Conway

    "DigitalDeath would kick my ass. He has the reach of a polar bear." - Crass3000

  14. #39
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    The CC company normally sticks it to the merchant for online sales. If a merchant ships to an address other than the CC billing address and the card is reported stolen they don't get paid by the CC company.

  15. #40
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    It's likely a ton of the fraud is also written off. Win win for cc. Stick it to merchant, when ya can't? Write it off.

    Sent from my XT1650 using TGR Forums mobile app
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  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by east or bust View Post
    this happened to me today... whoever's got the number isn't very smart. first purchase was for almost $1200 at Best Buy. Luckily I check my personal email daily and had two emails from my CC company. card is locked and should be receiving new one in a few days.


    I'm intrigued to know what goes on behind the scenes at these credit companies when cases are opened. I don't know how most CC fraud is carried out as far as purchases go. guessing mostly online purchases, but there have to be people loading the info onto dummy cards as well. if the latter case, in this day and age I can't imagine it being very difficult to pursue and at least have a decent shot at catching these people. surely there is data to pin point where and when the card was used, and what stores don't have cameras near check out..? with online purchases couldn't the IP be tracked?
    Most credit cards today (compared to when this thread was started 5 years ago) are chip cards. PCI https://www.pcicomplianceguide.org/ rules have changed and the merchants have for the most part had to invest in new credit card processing processes (pin pads with chip, and software, audits for devices and verify no skimmers.) Fewer mag stripe readers and locks on devices/security enhancements) Plus their networks are now more often pen scanned and evaluated for issues (like separate segment or vlan for the credit card transactions and not on the general network used for other devices. Target was one of the first big corporate breaches revealed back 5 years ago now and they got into the network via access for heating and cooling vendor monitoring or now the IoT devices (internet of things) vulnerabilities. Firewalls and routers, etc. Most large companies are all chip now because if they are not and end up with a fraudulent transaction due to not accepting a chip card and having the card swiped, then they are liable and not the credit card company https://www.creditcards.com/credit-c...swers-1264.php So some of this will still not stop the cards being redirected like the roommate intercepting the credit card discussed above. Chips also have not done anything for online no card present transactions.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by cramer View Post
    If you don't normally shop at walmart, its an instant stop on the card it sounds like. I got nailed last year xmas time. Sorry, both myself and my wife, lol. So we are there, buying a TV for my daughter. Just a 23" flat screen, nothing too major. We had some other crap we bought. I run my card, declined. I'm like fuck.. My phone is out in the car so i just had my wife run her's, ill figure it out later. Declined. At that point, im like fuck, they just autoblock walmart. Now we are both stuck with blocked debit cards. At that point, i was pissed off at the bank. We had to go to a banking center to get them unblocked. They wouldn't do it over the phone now that both of our are blocked. I was even more pissed off then.

    The moral of the story is you can get that block removed or add a certain amount. Banks are racial profiling Walmarts, thats all there is too it, lol.
    You shop at Walmart?


    Thatís gross

  18. #43
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    Credit card companies have some pretty sophisticated software. Years ago I had a purchase denied on a Discover card, luckily had another card to complete the purchase. Called Discover before I walked out of the store and they had locked it based on one purchase somewhere in the N'East.

    About five years ago I had two cards taken from my wallet at a YMCA. I did not notice the cards missing and an hour later Visa called me to ask if I had made a purchase at a local skate board shop. Thief had made the standard small purchase at a gas station, then went to the skate board shop. They locked the card and I immediately called AMEX to alert them and they had already locked it based on a $40 purchase at a retailer I shop at often. No idea how they can identify a local purchase from a place I shop at regularly but they did it. He also stole two sets of car keys (not mine) and took one of the vehicles for a joy ride, leaving the car in a Walmart parking lot later the same day.

    In this case they had video of the guy, identified him and he ended up in jail. In WI they have a website that you can search the Circuit Court records and he had a pretty extensive record of petty crimes, theft, drugs, bad checks etc. So for fun I walk over to the court when he gets sentenced, only two blocks from my office. Theft happened in January, he was arrested in March and he pleads no contest. Can't make bail so he is locked up in county jail until sentencing which is in September. He is going to be sentenced to time served. So he is in a orange jump suit, shackled, court reads charges, he is asked several times if he understands he is pleading guilty. Judge asks if he wants to make a statement, he does. So he gets up and tells the court he understands what he did was wrong, has had several months to think about his actions and he is deeply sorry. Judge does not look happy. Judge says I have a 12 year old daughter who goes to the YMCA often, including on Friday nights when they have teen night. She knows that rifling through lockers looking for money, stealing CC's and car keys is wrong. Would not take her five months in jail to understand that was wrong. Throws the plea agreement out and gives him another 90 days in jail. The County public defenders are in the same building as my office and a couple of them go to the YMCA so I know them. His public defender is a new one, I had never seen her before. So I bump into one of the PD's and ask him about the case and he laughs, "first rule of a defense atty is never, never let a defendant talk when a plea agreement is in place". "She wont do it again"

  19. #44
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    Chase, which issues Southwest-branded cards (I have one of those) and many others, is super aggressive about denying stuff but it's not that bad since they text and email you simultaneously with blocking it and you can unblock it in seconds by replying to the text or email. It's kind of a pain in the ass sometimes but the whole process takes less than a minute if you're aware of what's going on and reply quickly. If you're concerned about card security I recommend them.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    Chase, which issues Southwest-branded cards (I have one of those) and many others, is super aggressive about denying stuff but it's not that bad since they text and email you simultaneously with blocking it and you can unblock it in seconds by replying to the text or email. It's kind of a pain in the ass sometimes but the whole process takes less than a minute if you're aware of what's going on and reply quickly. If you're concerned about card security I recommend them.
    I've had a similar experience with their credit card, but they were worthless as tits on a bull when someone was drafting fraudulent checks against my checking account.

    The local branch guys made it right because they're decent people and they're hungry for my next IRA rollover, but the call center I dealt with on the phone was brutal.

  21. #46
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    Yeah I haven't actually had to speak to a human so far.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4matic View Post
    Bitcoins
    this
    .

  23. #48
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    so sorta related, I got a bill in the mail saturday from Samsung Finance (TD Bank) for a $700 phone someone bought online so apparently someone has my name, address, and SSN. I've reported application fraud, blocked, affidaivt on the way etc. Knock on wood this is the first time anything's happened since about 2004 for me.

    Do i need to do something pro-active with credit agencies etc. ? have others had this and is it just the start? etc.

    Dentist advice much appreicated!
    "Can't you see..."

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marshall Tucker View Post
    so sorta related, I got a bill in the mail saturday from Samsung Finance (TD Bank) for a $700 phone someone bought online so apparently someone has my name, address, and SSN. I've reported application fraud, blocked, affidaivt on the way etc. Knock on wood this is the first time anything's happened since about 2004 for me.

    Do i need to do something pro-active with credit agencies etc. ? have others had this and is it just the start? etc.

    Dentist advice much appreicated!
    Check your credit report with all 3 agencies to see if there are any other accounts opened with your SSN that you don't know about. Lock your credit report with all three credit agencies so no one can open any accounts with your SSN--or is that what you meant by blocked? I'd check on the IRS and SSA web sites for their procedures regarding stolen SSN. Among other things the thief can file an income tax return with your SSN to get a refund and when you get around to filing you may have a delay and big hassle getting your refund. File as early as you possibly can.

    One of the hassles with locking your credit report is that some companies and agencies--the SSA for example--use the info on your credit report--things like old addresses--to verify your identity. If your report is locked you may have a hard time verifying your identity with one of those entities, but you have to do it.

    You might want to look into LifeLock (owned by Norton)--I have no experience with this, other than getting spammed for it by Norton about once a week but might be worth it in your situation.

    By reporting application fraud do you mean a police report? If not definitely file one.

    If you have homeowner's insurance check with them; you might have ID theft coverage.

  25. #50
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    Not a CC issue but related story:

    My GF is an executive at a huge global company and last year someone filed an unemployment claim against her company in her name. Dumb move given its easy to check. So her company tells her about it and denied the claim.

    Typical government bureaucracy....even though the company denied the claim, state personally talked to my GF over the phone about it....they still decided to pay out the claim pending investigation.

    Person is local, but government agency refuses to release address of person claiming to company.

    Only in America....you can't make this stuff up.

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