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  1. #76
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    So you only bumped this thread for Hugh? Dang. That's kind of a letdown, man.

  2. #77
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    Aug 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danno View Post
    fuck, now you tell me!

    In any case, I posted because I have finally confirmed that it is the rims more than it is me. As I said in the first post, I know how to change a flat and have done many, but on this bike it's a bitch. Since I've owned this bike for years, the memory of easy flat changing has dwindled, and I began to wonder if it was all me. It's not. The shop guy struggled too, it's just that he has a lot more practice at this than I do; it's hard to get much better at something when you do it once or twice a year.
    Old Matrix rims? (finger mustache)

  3. #78
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    Jun 2008
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    SLCizzy
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    I'm an idiot, teach me how to change a flat

    Quote Originally Posted by Flea View Post
    Old Matrix rims? (finger mustache)
    Now we're talkin'

    Wire bead Conti Gatorskin on a Matrix rim....ptsd material....sweaty hands, multiple broken Pedro's levers and two mechanics questioning our life choices and in need of lunch beers.
    Last edited by joetron; 08-24-2016 at 10:10 PM.

  4. #79
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    Feb 2011
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    464
    Wheres Damian Sanders when you need him?

    Clearly your issue is that you're riding 27.5 rims which are a rip off and not riding east coast technical trails, which would loosen up the bead for you.

  5. #80
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    Dec 2003
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    Seattle
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    Are you using 27.5 compatible tire levers?

    That's probably the issue.
    Quote Originally Posted by Downbound Train View Post
    And there will come a day when our ancestors look back...........

  6. #81
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    Aug 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by joetron View Post
    Now we're talkin'

    Wire bead Conti Gatorskin on a Matrix rim....ptsd material....sweaty hands, multiple broken Pedro's levers and two mechanics questioning our life choices and in need lunch beers.
    Night sweats I tells ya. Those things suuuuuuuuuuucked

  7. #82
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    Aug 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by PNWbrit View Post
    Are you using 27.5 compatible tire levers?

    That's probably the issue.
    Gold!

  8. #83
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    Dec 2004
    Posts
    11,840
    Why people buy tire levers is a mystery.

    Been using the same one for 20+ years, works on just about anything and well, impossible (?) to break.

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    Specially since the weight is not a giant factor on a motorized bike.

  9. #84
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    Aug 2007
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    5,375
    Quote Originally Posted by PNWbrit View Post
    Are you using 27.5 compatible tire levers?

    That's probably the issue.
    His bike is so old, he's probably running 24".

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by bunion View Post
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    My girlfriend doesn't even bike and she even has one of these?

  11. #86
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    Apr 2008
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    Virgina (It's humid here)
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    4,450
    What other levers do you lads use? And how many come into play when the going gets tough?
    I've had a couple combos that were insanely hard to work with. Most recently a Spec Butcher getting on and getting off of a Nextie carbon rim. I was sure I was going to crack the rim getting the fucking thing off after a pinch flat. That time I was using Park levers, and needed three of them.
    Recently switched to the Crank Brothers thing. Picked it up as an impulse buy at REI and it doesn't suck too bad for a CB item.
    If you want me to take a dump in a box and mark it tubeless, I will. I got spare time.

  12. #87
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    Whistler
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    I have a set of Park Tool Heavy Duty Steel Tire Levers. They hang on the wall %99 of the time, but there are a few rim tire combos that I need to pull them out for. 2 levers, and only 2. I have not since the early 2000's with 26" downhill bikes and cheap Vee-Rubber (maxis knockoffs) tires have I had to use 3 levers.

  13. #88
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    Dec 2003
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    Seattle
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    What other levers do you lads use? And how many come into play when the going gets tough?
    I've had a couple combos that were insanely hard to work with. Most recently a Spec Butcher getting on and getting off of a Nextie carbon rim. I was sure I was going to crack the rim getting the fucking thing off after a pinch flat. That time I was using Park levers, and needed three of them.
    Recently switched to the Crank Brothers thing. Picked it up as an impulse buy at REI and it doesn't suck too bad for a CB item.
    Tire lever quiver.
    Quote Originally Posted by Downbound Train View Post
    And there will come a day when our ancestors look back...........

  14. #89
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    Jan 2008
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    livin the dream
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    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  15. #90
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    Aug 2008
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    Where everything's a dollar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danno View Post
    This JONG, dammit!

    I did take some solace in the fact that the shop guy also used a tire iron to get the tire back on; take that Garth Bimble!

    But I still need to get better at this shit, because I pinch the tube about 50% of the time when using a lever. But I need to remember some of the tricks in here, like wetting down the bead, and deflating the tube.
    As I'm getting old and forgetful I was going to mention the epic failure of using tire levers to put tires ON but since I see that I already have I won't.

    edit: Maybe this is your problem?

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/2...rips/87245344/

    If you need help using the latest smartphone app, ask a Millennial. If you need help opening a jar, you might want to turn elsewhere.

    Young adults in the United States are losing their grips, a recent study suggests. Researchers tested 237 of them and found that men ages 20 to 34 and women in their early 20s had significantly weaker hand grips than young people tested in 1985. Women in their late 20s were weaker in their right, but not left, hands.

    The findings, published in the Journal of Hand Therapy, prompted some headlines about Millennials having wimpy handshakes. Thats probably not a real concern, says researcher Elizabeth Fain, an assistant professor of occupational therapy at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina. The young people she tested had enough strength to manage a firm shake, she says. Its not like we shake hands with our full grips, she says.

    A bigger concern, she and other experts say, is that the hand grip findings if confirmed by larger studies could be a sign of more general flabbiness in a generation that does more texting and clicking than manual labor.

    Young people who spend more time texting and clicking
    Young people who spend more time texting and clicking may have weaker hands than generations past, a study suggests. (Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto)
    The fact that you have a weak grip is important because you probably are weak elsewhere, says Richard Bohannon, a physical therapist and a professor of health studies at Campbell University in Buies Creek, N.C. Its a window into your world. It provides a peek behind the curtain at your health status.

    Links between grip strength and overall health and vitality are especially strong in later years, Bohannon says. Older adults with weak grips are more likely to become disabled or die sooner, he says. When paired with other signs such as slow walking or trouble standing up from a chair a weak grip is a reliable sign of overall frailty in old age, he says.

    And one large study found that men with weak grips at midlife, ages 45 to 68, were more likely than men with strong grips to be disabled 25 years later.

    Its harder to say what a weak grip in a young adult might portend.

    Grip strength is not consistently linked with overall strength in studies of athletes and fit young people, says Peter Ronai, a clinical associate professor of exercise science at Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, Conn. But, he says, its quite plausible that sedentary living has contributed to declines in both overall strength and hand strength in many young adults.

    In 2014, just 29% of U.S. adults ages 18 to 44 regularly engaged in strength-building exercises, such as weight lifting, push-ups and pull-ups, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC recommends such activities at least twice a week for adults of all ages.

    Unless Millennials start working on their strength, in their hands and elsewhere, they may well enter old age with too little in reserve, Fain says. Everyday tasks, such as carrying grocery bags and lifting cooking pots, could get harder sooner, she says.

    A weak grip also could be an immediate problem for some young people, Ronai says. "There are jobs where its extremely important to have adequate grip strength, including firefighting, police work and some manufacturing jobs, he says. And sports from rock-climbing to tennis and golf require a strong grip.
    Last edited by Garth Bimble; 08-25-2016 at 10:20 AM.
    The Sheriff is near!

  16. #91
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    Dec 2006
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    I keep my pimp hand strong.

  17. #92
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    Mar 2006
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    Missoula, MT
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    I used to always win at mercy.
    Danno, make sure you are using the proper pneumatic fluid. It will make your life easier.
    No longer stuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    Just an uneducated guess.

  18. #93
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    Apr 2006
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    Spokane/Schweitzer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danno View Post
    fuck, now you tell me!

    In any case, I posted because I have finally confirmed that it is the rims more than it is me. As I said in the first post, I know how to change a flat and have done many, but on this bike it's a bitch. Since I've owned this bike for years, the memory of easy flat changing has dwindled, and I began to wonder if it was all me. It's not. The shop guy struggled too, it's just that he has a lot more practice at this than I do; it's hard to get much better at something when you do it once or twice a year.
    Maybe the shop guy just has man-hands and you don't?

  19. #94
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    9,143
    Have you tried using lube?

    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  20. #95
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    Sep 2005
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    PRB
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    Bumping my own thread of ineptitude because I am, finally, convinced that it is not my ineptitude.

    I have since changed out tubes on the wife's bike and the kiddo's bike. Very easy. Had to change out a tube on my bike (fucking goat heads) and the same misery.

    I can't wait till I have enough money to replace my 10 year old bike.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin

  21. #96
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    Oct 2003
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    slc
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    New rims are always an option.

  22. #97
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    Dec 2016
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    In a van... down by the river
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danno View Post
    <snip> (fucking goat heads)
    Tubeless.

    Absent that - put some tubeless sealant in your tube.

    HTH.

  23. #98
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    May 2011
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    Sonoma & Truckee
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    11,058
    Yes, and no re: new rims. You get such a better deal on new rims when they come with a built up bike. Although I'm sure there are exceptions / special deals, but generally speaking that seems to be the case.

    And yes, tubeless is the way to go. I used to be really good at changing tubes, now I'm slow AF because it almost never happens. Only had a to put a tube in once in the last 3-4 years.

  24. #99
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    Nov 2005
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    Land of Brine Shrimp and Magic Underwear
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    I've prolly already posted this in this thread but why are you still using tubes???
    There's nothing better than sliding down snow... flying through the air.

  25. #100
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    Oct 2003
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    slc
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    Quote Originally Posted by TahoeJ View Post
    Yes, and no re: new rims. You get such a better deal on new rims when they come with a built up bike. Although I'm sure there are exceptions / special deals, but generally speaking that seems to be the case.
    That's absolutely true, but I'm guessing his current rims aren't anything special so he's probably not missing out on some big OEM discount. $100 rims are probably fine. Maybe even have the shop handle the tubeless setup while they're at it. Whether it's worth it or not is going to depend on: Anticipated years until new bike X Number of tire changes/flat repairs expected per year X Hours of misery per tire change/flat repair.

    If the product of that equation adds up to:

    <5: Probably not worth it
    >10: Definitely worth it
    5-10: Possibly worth it, tough call, maybe just go tubeless and hope for the best

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