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  1. #76
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,388
    Quote Originally Posted by LostAgain View Post
    A heat-exchanger pot is a nice if you don't want to go JB.

    https://sectionhiker.com/olicamp-har...eat-exchanger/
    Olicamp stove and that pot are on the list.

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    1
    I also have been using JetBoil for years now, though it is a bit biased, it is the best one for me.

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,388

    Backpacking stoves?

    I decided to get another BRS and a 750ml titanium pot for her. At around 150g for both, itís certainly ultra-light.

    If she really gets into backpacking and wants something different in a few years, she/we can upgrade.

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Exiled from Maine
    Posts
    331
    Picked up a jetboil cheap via REI. The boil speed is ludicrous. Not the smallest but fits well in my pack and having coffee in under 2 minutes with a via packet is faster than my real kitchen. I took a video to send to my brother - 8 Oz in under 50 seconds.


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  5. #80
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,388
    Quote Originally Posted by Abol98 View Post
    Picked up a jetboil cheap via REI. The boil speed is ludicrous. Not the smallest but fits well in my pack and having coffee in under 2 minutes with a via packet is faster than my real kitchen. I took a video to send to my brother - 8 Oz in under 50 seconds.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Why is everyone in a hurry when cooking in the woods?

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    5,100
    Quote Originally Posted by Peruvian View Post
    Why is everyone in a hurry when cooking in the woods?
    COFFEE!!

  7. #82
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Shuswap Highlands
    Posts
    2,710
    Alcohol beercan stove and MSR espresso maker is the bomb for real coffee. Can't beat the weight to BTU ratio either. Just tie a fly or two, or set up the bedroll while waiting.
    I usually just default to my old MSR whisperlight int. for backpacking for boiling water quickly. Better newer option out there, but no need to throw out what works yet. But serious about the coffee method above. Those little espresso makers don't fit on a proper stove, and alcohol travels easily.

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Exiled from Maine
    Posts
    331
    Quote Originally Posted by Peruvian View Post
    Why is everyone in a hurry when cooking in the woods?

    woods? Iím a chemist for ANTIFA.


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  9. #84
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
    Posts
    13,336
    MSR Reactor and Windburner use the same radiant burner/heat exchanger pot technology. AFAICT, Windburner is MSR's attempt to compete directly with JetBoil with the backpacker market. Reactor is marketed as a mountaineering stove for melting snow and boiling water, even in very windy conditions, which it does better than everything else. Both outperform all JB models in windy conditions. No contest in strong or swirling winds. JBs simmer better. Reactor has no simmer mode. Windburner can be dialed down to sorta simmer. We carry a Reactor for all trips, usually with the small 1L pot. The big/rare 2.5L pot is the snowmelting champion. The OG 1.7L pot is the best all-rounder.

    For high lakes fishing trips, we got a MSR Pocket Rocket Deluxe, which is getting high marks for simmering and very good wind performance for a stand alone stove (vs. shielded stove/pot combos). For most trips, we'll carry both the PR Deluxe and a Reactor 1.0L combo until and unless I'm sold on the PR Deluxe performance in windy conditions. We'll be mating the PR Deluxe with a Bank's Fry-Bake pan, with which the NOLS mags are familiar.

  10. #85
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    366
    I now have the pocket rocket deluxe which ticks all my boxes. Use an MSR titan kettle. Used one of the BRS3000 for a few years, super light, bad simmer and horrible quality control, but super light. Had the pot supports heat up and get all wacky. Everything you wanted to know about stoves. https://backpackinglight.com/upright...nd-gear-guide/



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  11. #86
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Moose, Iowa
    Posts
    6,315
    How much more fuel do you use with the little stoves with no wind protection? We've been using an MSR Whisperlite Uni with the canister attachment the last three years. The thing is a tank but with the old school aluminum foilish shield we average 1 canister for 5 nights/6 day backpack. Sometimes we have to switch to a fresh canister to finish the week sometimes not. That includes heating enough water to fill two or three big thermomugs with coffee since both the wife and I like to sip coffee all day.

    We recently picked up a Soto Amicus and the thing is tiny and light, the little igniter is super convenient . Took it car camping and it is pretty sweet for boil or simmer or anything in between but performance in the wind is definitely not as good as a wrapped pot with a remote stove. We obviously bought it to shed weight, and hopefully we can get away with just using 2 canisters in a week so we aren't carrying additional fuel.

    What is the over/under on protected stoves vs unprotected increased fuel use verses days on the trail? We use a pretty big titanium pot to feed the 4 of us. We usually emerge with a barely used or full 2nd canister. I'm assuming we will be good. I'm over the hassle and weight of the MSR.

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