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  1. #1176
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    The French Dispatch
    Saw the new Wes Anderson effort on Thursday.
    Had the entire theater to myself.
    If you dig Old School long-form journalism where the author was as much a part of the story as the story itself, then this gem is for you.
    Hat tips to Jacques Tati, Noir, The French New Wave, and Hitchcock permeate the screen; I am sure there were more homages, but those were the key ones that my limited cinematic knowledge picked-up on.
    Additionally, Anderson lovingly takes the piss out of the art world, travelogues, student protests, and epicurean exposition.
    The only weak link, imho, was Timothee Chalamet. The character he played would have been better portrayed by the likes of Jason Schwartzman (except JS is 20 years too old for the part).
    As for the overall composition, Anderson takes his whole stage play artifice-meets-Cindy Shermanesque diorama stylistics to new heights with this film.
    If you enjoyed The Grand Budapest Hotel, then you will probably find this entertaining, as well.
    Last edited by dookeyXXX; 11-27-2021 at 04:57 PM.
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  2. #1177
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    Julia
    Sacre merde!!!
    Julia Child was a Boss.
    This is a wonderfully charming documentary about the life and times of a true gastronomic pioneer.
    It's informative, illuminating, funny AF, and poignant.
    She was truly a larger-than-life personality.
    And her love of butter? Holy moly!

    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  3. #1178
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    Definitely loved “The French Dispatch”, (though I’m a Wes fan). I laughed at all the almost cameos as they appear. We just saw “King Richard” last night (which is really a documentary).
    Also…what the hell is Belfast about? I can’t tell from the preview/trailer.


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  4. #1179
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    Quote Originally Posted by plugboots View Post
    Also…what the hell is Belfast about? I can’t tell from the preview/trailer.
    I yammered about it in post #1172 on the previous page (https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...70#post6456270).

    But here's the uber short take:

    It's a coming-of-age story largely taking place on a residential street in Belfast circa 1969 at the outset of "The Troubles."
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  5. #1180
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    Wolf (2021)
    Definitely not to be confused with the decent Jack Nicholson vehicle from 1994.
    Of all the mono syllabic herd animal films that came out this year (Pig and Lamb being the other two), Wolf is the weakest of the pack.
    Where the film fails is that it never feels centered. It's unsure of whether to be an absurdist dark comedy (a la King of Hearts or Swiss Army Man), a serious drama (a la Girl Interrupted), a scathing indictment of mental health practises, or a quirky love story.
    I will give props to George MacKay, whose lithe body and lanky mannerisms capture a wolf like aura, but Paddy Considine's sadistic turn as the head doctor never reaches Nurse Ratchet levels of inhumanity and instead comes off merely as a vile villain stereotype.
    While the trailer was promising, sadly once the "novelty" of lycanthropy wears off we are left with nothing more than a routine dysfunctional teen romance. After all is said and done, the film feels like an ABC Afterschool Special gussied up as an edgy arthouse effort.
    Rating: 2/5
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  6. #1181
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    Ghostbuster: Afterlife
    I was pretty hesitant and downright ambivalent about this film ever since the trailer dropped. But since there is currently very little snow in Tahoe and my winter job hasn't started I broke down and went to see it yesterday.
    Lo and behold, it is actually pretty decent. I was pleasantly surprised and found that I rather enjoyed its summer popcorn flick vibe. It was just what the doctor ordered for this slow start winter.
    For the most part it's a super nostalgia bomb for those who grew up on films like The Goonies, Gremlins, and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.
    Most of the cast is great, but the standouts are Carrie Coon and Mckenna Grace; the film probably would have crumbled without them. The story is kind of a retrofitted rehash of the 1984 film, but has enough new vim and vigor to keep it afloat and feeling moderately fresh. The pacing is superb, glossing over needless exposition in favor of keeping things moving along briskly. There are a few story holes, but the swift pace mostly covers them up. That said, the film is not without its hiccups, mostly in the form of the gratuitous (and, imho, unessecary) fan service "obligations," but overall it is a fun and breezy diversion and a pretty worthy sequel to the original.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  7. #1182
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    Coming in spring 2022 from the brilliantly twisted fools responsible for Swiss Army Man...

    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  8. #1183
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    So .... a day stuck inside well spent!

  9. #1184
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    The Matrix Resurrections
    More like The Meh-trix.
    This is one of those sequel reboots that should have never been greenlit.
    I knew I was in for mediocrity when they started using "flashback" clips from the first film and continued to sprinkle them throughout the 148 minute run time.
    The fight scenes were clumsy and claustrophobic and the action sequences would make Michael Bay cringe. Overall this iteration lacks any of the finesse and visual flair of the original film from which it laboriously clings to.
    And the film's whole meta approach was limp wristed at best.
    There's a moment when the character named Bug says something to the effect of "they took something very meaningful and made it trivial," which pretty much sums up this film.
    The best thing about it was the gaudy clothes that the new Morpheus wears; they looked like they were rousted from a Dolemite wardrobe.
    To sum it up: at the climax, the majority of the audience in the theater laughed; it was not a "holy shot that was amazing!" laugh, but rather a "wow, that was f%&king stupid!" laugh.

    2/5
    Last edited by dookeyXXX; 12-23-2021 at 01:11 AM.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  10. #1185
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    Nightmare Alley
    While not quite in the league of The Shape of Water, Crimson Peak, or Pan's Labyrinth, Guillermo del Toro's take on William Lindsay Gresham's 1946 novel is still worth a watch. For one, it's a lush and extravagant production, both in look and feel. For another, it's a bit more true to the source material than the lauded 1947 Tyrone Power's starring film.
    The real draw here, after Dan Laustsen's rich cinematography and Tamara Deverell's slick, yet gritty production design, is the cast, which is top-notch and insanely engaging.
    It's not without its faults, however. The beginning is a bit shaky and the ending doesn't resonate with the same twisting horror as the novel, but the middle part of the film is pretty damn glorious; it serves as a spicy filling sandwiched between two slices of bread.
    And while some of the changes del Toro and Kim Morgan made in their script are a bit wonky, many of them are great.

    RIYL
    Crimson Peak; The Shape of Water
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  11. #1186
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    The King's Man
    The prequel/origin story to the Kingsman franchise is an entertaining romp fueled by a suberb cast, snappy action sequences, and rather restrained (which is nice) humor (compared to the over-the-top absurdity of the previous two films).
    Filled with a few twists, plenty of ribald antics, a bit of ballet, and some wonderful callbacks, it's engaging from start to finish. One of its major triumphs is that it deftly manages to take itself seriously and take the piss in equal measure, resulting in a well balanced blast of historical fiction.

    FWIW, I saw The film with my 87 year-old dad who is a history buff. He enjoyed the way they tweaked key historical moments of WW1 and how they played around with the various historical figures augmenting the story.
    Last edited by dookeyXXX; 12-27-2021 at 02:32 PM.
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  12. #1187
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    I really enjoyed it, too. The WW1 history rewrite was interesting. Making the US the heroes and completely ignoring the French is uh, interesting to say the least. Otherwise it was a fun one.

    The new Matrix on the other hand, what an abomination of a movie. They basically admit ten minutes in this is just a money maker, and it felt like everyone just phoned it in. I think there is a good movie in there somewhere beneath all of the awkward call backs and the unfollowable plot.

  13. #1188
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    Licorice Pizza
    Imagine if Quentin Tarantino, Richard Linklater, and Cameron Crowe had collaborated on a flashback episode of Seinfeld, which took place in L.A. during the 1973 oil crisis. That's kinda, sorta, but not really the vibe of Paul Thomas Anderson's latest cinematic exploit, which at its core is an unconventional love story featuring waterbeds, pinball machines, and schmarmy Hollywood characters.
    It's idiosyncratic, uncomfortably charming, quirky, and hilarious and features some tour de force acting, gonzo cameos, and enough eccentricity to keep you thoroughly entertained.

    RIYL
    Almost Famous; Dazed and Confused; Once Upon A Time In Hollywood; Fast Times at Ridgemont High; Everybody Wants Some; Pulp Fiction
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

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  14. #1189
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    Not in theaters but “The Rescue” on Disney+ was worth the watch. Insane.


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