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  1. #126
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Squaw valley
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukonrider View Post
    Still fighting this, but have been moving the right direction. Currently good until about the 3 hour tour mark, then things start to go downhill managbly, but i shudder to think of a 5 hour tour.

    Trying to decide my next move, wondering if I should do another small punch, or try and get custom orthotics made. The SOLE inserts did help, but my main question is this:
    For those who have tried both will a pedortho make something better, or will it just be a $250 version of the SOLE product?
    The boots aren't exactly a tight fit, so hesitant to keep punching, unless that's what I have to do.
    I found that there shouldn't be ANY lateral pressure at the widest part of the foot from the boot

    Sent from my moto g 5G using Tapatalk

  2. #127
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    14,932

    Treatment of Mortons Neuroma - intense burning pain in ball of foot

    Quote Originally Posted by Yukonrider View Post
    Still fighting this, but have been moving the right direction. Currently good until about the 3 hour tour mark, then things start to go downhill managbly, but i shudder to think of a 5 hour tour.

    Trying to decide my next move, wondering if I should do another small punch, or try and get custom orthotics made. The SOLE inserts did help, but my main question is this:
    For those who have tried both will a pedortho make something better, or will it just be a $250 version of the SOLE product?
    The boots aren't exactly a tight fit, so hesitant to keep punching, unless that's what I have to do.
    You need a metatarsal arch pad or an orthotic with one built in. It’ll keep your metatarsals spread and take pressure off the neuroma. Most(none?) off the shelf insoles have much if any metatarsal pad. Try putting a pad under or on top of your insoles in that little pocket behind the metatarsal heads. You’ll probably find relief.

    You can get punches or a wider boot but the metatarsal arch will still collapse without a pad and that’s what puts pressure on the neuroma.

    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  3. #128
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Last Best City in the Last Best Place
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    7,411
    I would do both the metatarsal pad and another punch. An all of the above approach is best. I assume you are using toe sock liners. If not you should be.

    The pads can be uncomfortable at first but you'll get used to them. Once the pain goes away completely I think you can stop with the pads, unless you start feeling twinges of pain again.

    I've never used any sort of custom ortho, just those blue footbeds sold OTC.

  4. #129
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Denial
    Posts
    2,582
    Quote Originally Posted by yeahman View Post
    I assume you are using toe sock liners. If not you should be.
    Toe sock liners?

    I decided today I should get another punch. Seems as my feet swell my feet get squeezed. They feel really roomy to start the day, then slowly get tighter.
    The whole human race is de evolving; it is due to birth control, smart people use birth control, and stupid people keep pooping out more stupid babies.

  5. #130
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Last Best City in the Last Best Place
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukonrider View Post
    Toe sock liners?
    They really help keep your toes and metatarsals spread out rather than scrunched. I don't need them skiing anymore but if I go for a long hike or to bag a peak I always wear them and they help a lot.

    Injinji Liner Crew Toesocks https://a.co/d/dQQxNa7

    I wear a thin regular wool sock over them.

  6. #131
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    23,394
    It might be worth a visit to a podiatrist to see if the SOLE's metpad is adequate and in the right place for your foot--bring your boots. Looking at the online photo of the met pad version it does look like the met pad is pretty thin, although hard to be sure from a picture. If it's not adequate you can stick on a pad to beef it up. I wouldn't think a full custom-made insole would be any better for plantar neuromas unless the SOLE met pad isn't in the right place for your foot.

  7. #132
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dystopia
    Posts
    21,318
    Another thought. Sometimes it’s the liner.

    Went for another punch after it still hurt with one punch and top skill level ski footbeds with a met bump.
    He refused the punch.

    Took the liner out and made vertical gull slits ( only through the outer liner skin - not all the way through) on the knuckle of my little toe ( or whatever the fuck you call it - distal metatarsal??)

    That provided more relief.
    If your liner is tight punching the shell won’t help.
    I’ve just decided to be a middle aged somewhat depressed somewhat anxious fucktard until the end.

  8. #133
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Squaw valley
    Posts
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    On a tight liner you could make a slit in the sole

    Sent from my moto g 5G using Tapatalk

  9. #134
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
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    23,394
    Quote Originally Posted by Core Shot View Post
    Another thought. Sometimes it’s the liner.

    Went for another punch after it still hurt with one punch and top skill level ski footbeds with a met bump.
    He refused the punch.

    Took the liner out and made vertical gull slits ( only through the outer liner skin - not all the way through) on the knuckle of my little toe ( or whatever the fuck you call it - distal metatarsal??)

    That provided more relief.
    If your liner is tight punching the shell won’t help.
    Proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP)

  10. #135
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dystopia
    Posts
    21,318
    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    Proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP)
    Thx Doc!
    I’ve just decided to be a middle aged somewhat depressed somewhat anxious fucktard until the end.

  11. #136
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Ogden
    Posts
    9,209
    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    I've got new ski touring boots this year. I'm hoping I can get them to where spring steeps skiing is fun and pain free for me again.
    Bump and back again. I think I’m ready to throw in the towel and just get the surgery on my right foot. I’ve been in 5 different ski boots in 3 years, gotten custom insoles and visited two different highly recommended boot fitters. None of it seems to help if I spend more than 4-5 hours in boots or if I am on hard snow.

    This spring looks like I’ll miss out on climbing and skiing mountains because my feet hurt too much to do it, or I’ll be recovering from the surgery. At least one of those tracks puts me in a position to return to spring season next year.

  12. #137
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Squaw valley
    Posts
    4,721
    Are you sure that your boots or shoes are wide enough?

    And you have a pad on the orthotics to spread your toes?

    Surgery success is not great.

    Since the neuroma is caused by mechanical issues, mostly narrow shoes, it can only be fixed by mechanical means.

    I had it for many years and finally cured it 7 years ago by making sure my bc boots were wide enough

    Sent from my moto g 5G using Tapatalk

  13. #138
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Ogden
    Posts
    9,209
    Quote Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post
    Are you sure that your boots or shoes are wide enough?

    And you have a pad on the orthotics to spread your toes?

    Surgery success is not great.

    Since the neuroma is caused by mechanical issues, mostly narrow shoes, it can only be fixed by mechanical means.

    I had it for many years and finally cured it 7 years ago by making sure my bc boots were wide enough

    Sent from my moto g 5G using Tapatalk
    I went wider and wider till the bootfitter said you have too much foot movement and that irritates the neuroma. So I went back to gentle support, custom footbeds, and yes pad on the footbed to spread. None of it does much. I can manage the pain in any other type of footwear than ski boots.

    My surgery on my left foot seems successful, I'm 5 years out this summer and no more pain. I have seen some websites that claim 70% of surgeries are unsuccessful, but they all seem to be selling some other solution. Do you have any real studies that show stats of outcomes?

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