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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    Never heard of it, but curious now. I’ve almost resolved myself to have surgery on my right foot now. I’m several years out form the surgery on my left foot and its still *mostly* pain free.
    Good info here on cryo and RF ablation: https://www.mortonsneuroma.com/morto.../non-surgical/

    Sounds promising but only an 80% or so success rate.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColMan View Post
    Good info here on cryo and RF ablation: https://www.mortonsneuroma.com/morto.../non-surgical/

    Sounds promising but only an 80% or so success rate.
    80% sounds good to me!

    That site is interesting. Says women suffer more. All those pointy shoes etc.
    makes sense.

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    I blame Lange and technica. I jammed my foot into narrow lasts for way too many days. Oh well. It was fun.

  3. #103
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    Also reading about cutting intermetatarsal ligament to release pressure on the nerve as an alternative to a neurectomy. Less invasive but I don't like the idea of cutting a ligament in the foot of an athlete. Also doesn't work if the scar tissue growth is beyond a certain size.

    On another note, I'm trying pulsed magnetic sessions 3 times a week to see if it has any benefit from a pain management perspective and to hopefully stop gimping around. Inexpensive so I figured what the heck. Had my first session this past Monday and it did jack shit, but we'll see how it goes with a few more.

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Here are my recs from getting MN from a too-narrow pair of Dalbellos:

    - Blow out/punch the first and fifth met (basically the wide part of your forefront) in all your boots. Do it now.
    - Invest in footbeds with a metpad bump. Both for skiing and regular/everyday/non-skiing use. Sole makes footbeds with met pad bumps that I put in all my footwear. For ski boots, custom footbeds, but Soles might work too.
    - At home, I have slides with a metpad bump. In summer, I swap for flip-flops with the metpad bump. This helps a ton for avoiding walking on hard, flat surfaces (like wood floors) that do no favors for MN.
    - Add stretching your foot to your exercise stuff. Before/after skiing, etc. Don't overthink it - just move it around.

    I went from horrible MN to almost never feeling it now. No surgery required. If you already are having MN from this ski season though, it may require taking off your ski boots for a few months for you (so, next summer) to see marked improvement. Nerves take a long time to heal. Suerte.
    Last edited by meter-man; 01-25-2023 at 12:04 PM.
    sproing!

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by meter-man View Post
    Here are my recs from getting MN from a too-narrow pair of Dalbellos:

    - Blow out/punch the first and fifth met (basically the wide part of your forefront) in all your boots. Do it new.
    - Invest in footbeds with a metpad bump. Both for skiing and regular/everyday/non-skiing use. Sole makes footbeds with met pad bumps that I put in all my footwear. For ski boots, custom footbeds, but Soles might work too.
    - At home, I have slides with a metpad bump. In summer, I swap for flip-flops with the metpad bump. This helps a ton for avoiding walking on hard, flat surfaces (like wood floors) that do not favors for MN.
    - Add stretching your foot to your exercise stuff. Before/after skiing, etc. Don't overthink it - just move it around.

    I went from horrible MN to almost never feeling it now. No surgery required. If you already are having MN from this ski season though, it may require taking off your ski boots for a few months for you (so, next summer) to see marked improvement. Nerves take a long time to heal. Suerte.
    Very true. Surgery is a scam.
    Mn starts from narrow shoes, mechanical issue, and it's fixed by removing that.

    Sent from my moto g 5G using Tapatalk

  6. #106
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    Sandy
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    Stretching, proper meta pad insoles and slides, never ever EVER walk barefoot anywhere has been my mantra with 80% success in keeping the pain at bay. If it gets real bad, toe separators at 20-30 minutes on work wonders for me as well.
    And self foot massage especially after snowboarding.
    I have Redi-Thodics Comfort Plus Met Pad orthotics and they are amazing. And from my doc they are $40/pair out the door.

  7. #107
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    Jan 2023
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    19
    ladd the metatarsal pads to the footbeds.

  8. #108
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    Mar 2006
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    CO
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    Got a cortisone shot in the nerve last Wednesday. Seems to help quite a bit but not 100%. Was able walk normally a few days later and also to ski for 2 hours on Sunday with my two front buckles unbuckled (only pain was when I moved my foot off the footbed while in line, no pain while skiing). Going to keep it to kid days for now while I see how things shake out. Boots finally getting punched this week.

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
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    70
    I've had to blow out the whole 5th metatarsal/5th toe area on one boot. Added a bunch of room. SOLE also has good met pad insoles. Size them to the boot not your foot, otherwise they will take up too much space in there.

  10. #110
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    Jan 2008
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    Intuition FX and HD race have plenty of room in the forefoot while having snug fit for skinny calves. My neuromas haven't bothered me since I started using the HD's. That's in Technica Mach 1 130 LV's.

  11. #111
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    Oct 2003
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    Not a fan. Lots of on my feet lately and man this shit hurts a lot.

  12. #112
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    Well fuck. Just read this thread and I'm like 80% sure I have this in my left foot from a too narrow pair of Dalbellos last year. Had to stop mid run today and take my foot out of my boot it was so bad.

    I spend 90% of my summer in Sperry Topsiders (almost barefoot) this is not doing me any favors? I never feel it except for ski boots, and then usually only when touring after about 40 minutes, then real bad once I transition and tighten my boots up (I forget if it was a problem in alpine boots last year but I don't think so) and this one pair of approach shoes on long hikes.

    As its the start of ski season I would love to head this off before it gets worse? I suppose there is no way to heal it once it has started? Anything I can do before my tour tomorrow or is it best to stay off it until I have a solution in place?

    Should I go see a podiatrist, or what steps should I take?
    The whole human race is de evolving; it is due to birth control, smart people use birth control, and stupid people keep pooping out more stupid babies.

  13. #113
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    If you have any friends w recs for a podiatrist in your area, I’d start there. It’s an aggravated nerve and it’s definitely possible for it to go away. Sometimes toe spacers help relive the pressure

  14. #114
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    For me, a prp injection 4 years ago fixed it.

    This after 3 years of trying everything else

    Sent from my moto g 5G using Tapatalk

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcski View Post
    If you have any friends w recs for a podiatrist in your area
    SLC mags?
    The whole human race is de evolving; it is due to birth control, smart people use birth control, and stupid people keep pooping out more stupid babies.

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post
    For me, a prp injection 4 years ago fixed it.

    This after 3 years of trying everything else

    Sent from my moto g 5G using Tapatalk
    Did insurance cover that? How pricey was it?

  17. #117
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    Dec 2010
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    Quoting my own post which you probably saw. Addressing the problem with mechanical fixes worked for me and continues to work.

    Quote Originally Posted by yeahman View Post
    I had this really bad a couple years ago. Could barely walk. These are the steps I took to fix the problem:

    1. Had all my ski boot shells punched out so my forefoot was not being squeezed. Then punched them again. (Yes you sacrifice a bit of performance.)

    2. Threw away $500 in hiking shoes, work boots, etc., and bought all 4E wide shoes. Tough to find and I mostly ended up with dorky Sketchers. They make a couple ok hiking boots though. And 4E Asics from Famous Footwear are good and cheap too.

    3. Started wearing toe separators every evening while watching tv or reading. Soft rubber kind. See photo.

    4. Bought toe socks/liners and wore them when skiing and hiking. This (along with xtra wide shoes) does a great job of keeping your toes from squishing together, which of course is what irritates the nerves in the ball of your foot and causes the pain.

    I was surprised all this worked. The pain was so severe at times I thought for sure I would require surgery. But doing all this before you build up a bunch of scar tissue is important. It is an investment and a PITA but all I knew was that crazy shooting pain every time I set my foot down was going to ruin my life if I didn't get it under control. Now I don't even wear the toe socks or separators anymore unless I feel some twinges. Then I do it a few days and it goes away. Bottom line is you need to stop your ski boots and shoes from squeezing your toes and forefoot by getting new gear, shell punches, whatever it takes. Good luck, it sucks to deal with but try this stuff before surgery.


  18. #118
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    Nov 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukonrider View Post
    SLC mags?
    I started using SOLE footbeds with the met pad bumps in all of my footwear, including slides I use at home in lieu of barefoot. Don’t underestimate your non ski footwear.

    For ski boots, I blew it out the first and fifth met heads on my boots. Slightly less lateral control but no more screaming pain. At first, I put met pad bumps on my insoles but eventually realized I just needed more lateral space.

    I have no more MN pain. Maybe 1-2 days a year down from 120-150. No surgical or medical interventions. YMMV.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    sproing!

  19. #119
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    Mar 2005
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    Yep. Done all the above except for the toe spacers and toe socks

    My custom ski footbeds with a sweet met bump combined with wider boots were a game changer.

    Finally got around to using better footbeds in my now wide street and hiking shoes. Haven’t gone custom. But the cheapest A Line soles I can feel a nice met bump.

    And yes. It’s only my right foot. Which I blame on JH. That whole sidecountry involves so much step up traverses on the right foot. And I did too many seasons on a really tight fit technica

    And yes. I used to take off my right boot at lunch.

    A bit of freedom and massage helps. Also helps to put your bare foot on an ice cube or snow.

    PS. Hadn’t heard of prp. Interesting.
    https://www.mortonsneuroma.com/morto...t-rich-plasma/

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcski View Post
    Did insurance cover that? How pricey was it?
    Insurance does not cover it. About 700.

    And also you need wide shoes

    Sent from my moto g 5G using Tapatalk

  21. #121
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    Squaw valley
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    And, i was drunk when i write my prp post. I confused it with my plantar fasciitis.

    For mortons, all i had to do was make sure that my ski boots and all my shoes were wide enough in the forefoot that there was no pressure side to side.

    Mortons is caused by mechanical issues (tight shoes) and it shoved by eliminating them. It takes a while though

    Sent from my moto g 5G using Tapatalk

  22. #122
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    Jan 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukonrider View Post
    Well fuck. Just read this thread and I'm like 80% sure I have this in my left foot from a too narrow pair of Dalbellos last year. Had to stop mid run today and take my foot out of my boot it was so bad.

    I spend 90% of my summer in Sperry Topsiders (almost barefoot) this is not doing me any favors? I never feel it except for ski boots, and then usually only when touring after about 40 minutes, then real bad once I transition and tighten my boots up (I forget if it was a problem in alpine boots last year but I don't think so) and this one pair of approach shoes on long hikes.

    As its the start of ski season I would love to head this off before it gets worse? I suppose there is no way to heal it once it has started? Anything I can do before my tour tomorrow or is it best to stay off it until I have a solution in place?

    Should I go see a podiatrist, or what steps should I take?
    If it's only in ski boots chances are you can deal with it fairly easily. Step one would be to ski with top buckles tight and lower just tight enough to stay closed. That has worked for me and I have long established plantar neuromas. Hopefully the heel ankle fit is good enough to do that without compromising control. Maybe a replacement liner with low volume in the forefoot. Plantar neuroma symptoms can result from too LOOSE boots because people crank them down to compensate.

  23. #123
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    Dec 2010
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    Last Best City in the Last Best Place
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    Just punch out your shells. Twice if needed.

  24. #124
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    Oct 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    Time to bump this up. I had surgery on my left foot, and although I still feel the bump in there, it never really causes me pain.

    My right foot on the other hand nearly brought me to tears yesterday multiple times. Why is cramponing and skiing in hard snow so much worse than any other activity? I'd link two turns on steep hard snow and almost double over in pain. Skiing down the apron where I could ski by primarily using the downhill inside edge caused almost no pain.
    I've got new ski touring boots this year. I'm hoping I can get them to where spring steeps skiing is fun and pain free for me again.

  25. #125
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    Oct 2007
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    Still fighting this, but have been moving the right direction. Currently good until about the 3 hour tour mark, then things start to go downhill managbly, but i shudder to think of a 5 hour tour.

    Trying to decide my next move, wondering if I should do another small punch, or try and get custom orthotics made. The SOLE inserts did help, but my main question is this:
    For those who have tried both will a pedortho make something better, or will it just be a $250 version of the SOLE product?
    The boots aren't exactly a tight fit, so hesitant to keep punching, unless that's what I have to do.
    The whole human race is de evolving; it is due to birth control, smart people use birth control, and stupid people keep pooping out more stupid babies.

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