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  1. #1001
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,576
    I did the fattystripper last year. I agree - installation was a breeze and it held air well. The worry that I had was with a trail side repair. If I have to remove the tire to put a tube in, I have to replace the strip. With a good tape job, I should be able to remove the tire at least a few times.

    In addition, I swap between studs in the winter and regular tires in the summer. That means at least two sets of strips each year. For me, they became less valuable.

    Seth

    Sent from my SM-N970U using Tapatalk

  2. #1002
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    90
    The Cafe Latex rim strips have treated me well for fat bike tubeless. I have yet to encounter any form of air loss running them in combination with Orange Seal Subzero.

  3. #1003
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    15,956
    Tubeless for my Buzzkill and tubes for my Pugs setup as a snow bike.
    watch out for snakes

  4. #1004
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Gateway to The Greens
    Posts
    491
    What’s the standard for fat tire pressure measurement? I have an analog low pressure gauge I picked up from my lbs and I thought I was good to go. Tried my buddy’s digital gauge and it is way different, like several psi off.

    So when people are saying that they’re running 6.5 psi or whatever, how do they know? What’s the gauge to have that has the least margin of error?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #1005
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Can/USA
    Posts
    852
    Quote Originally Posted by Generalstark View Post
    What’s the standard for fat tire pressure measurement? I have an analog low pressure gauge I picked up from my lbs and I thought I was good to go. Tried my buddy’s digital gauge and it is way different, like several psi off.

    So when people are saying that they’re running 6.5 psi or whatever, how do they know? What’s the gauge to have that has the least margin of error?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    This is what i use for all my biking... i think its accurate? but its the only one i have so how am i to know?
    https://www.chainreactioncycles.com/...e/rp-prod53796

  6. #1006
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,576
    At the end of the day I think it's more about precision than accuracy. Most gauges are off a little bit (accuracy). What's important is that you dial in your preferred riding pressure on your gauge and that it can reproduce that measurement time and time again.

    I run 4-4.5 in the front and 5-5.5 in the back in snow on my Terene Wazia Tough 4.6. Is my accupressure gauge perfectly accurate? Probably not, but I feel that it's precise - meaning each time I set it to 4.5 psi on that gauge it feels the same.

    Seth

    Sent from my SM-N970U using Tapatalk

  7. #1007
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    492
    I think this is the one that I have. I know they make a few different models. Believe mine maxes out at 30psi, so it does double duty for the summer mtb. Think I paid $20 at the local shop. See it on Amazon for around $15. Works with pets and shraeder (look closely for that ability, not all do)

    Sent from my SM-T580 using Tapatalk

  8. #1008
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    15,956
    I bought a digital gauge and barely used it, my analog gauge get used all the time.

    I have the same one above.
    watch out for snakes

  9. #1009
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Central VT
    Posts
    4,152
    Quote Originally Posted by Iowagriz View Post
    I think this is the one that I have. I know they make a few different models. Believe mine maxes out at 30psi, so it does double duty for the summer mtb. Think I paid $20 at the local shop. See it on Amazon for around $15. Works with pets and shraeder (look closely for that ability, not all do)

    Sent from my SM-T580 using Tapatalk
    I’ve been using this same gauge for a few seasons. Works perfectly.

    I’m running 4-5 psi with my 4.95 in. tires. Maybe a 6 if it’s firm.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  10. #1010
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Gateway to The Greens
    Posts
    491
    Quote Originally Posted by sethschmautz View Post
    At the end of the day I think it's more about precision than accuracy. Most gauges are off a little bit (accuracy). What's important is that you dial in your preferred riding pressure on your gauge and that it can reproduce that measurement time and time again.

    I run 4-4.5 in the front and 5-5.5 in the back in snow on my Terene Wazia Tough 4.6. Is my accupressure gauge perfectly accurate? Probably not, but I feel that it's precise - meaning each time I set it to 4.5 psi on that gauge it feels the same.

    Seth

    Sent from my SM-N970U using Tapatalk
    I get what you're saying. I'm using the same Meiser analog gauge others have mentioned. My model is 0-15 psi.

    I have generally been running 5-6 psi (according to my gauge). When using my friend's gauge the tires felt different at the same psi reading. Hence my question as to what is the standard? Others have mentioned what psi they like to ride at but I'm getting the sense that we're not all experiencing the same thing. For my own riding using the same gauge may prove to be "precise" for my own experience. I'm just curious how those more expert in the fat tire ways are measuring tire pressure so as to know they're making the same comparisons between tires and riders experiences.

    Am I overthinking this? Perhaps, but isn't that the point of internet forums?

  11. #1011
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    4,679
    My auto mechanic is an old school top fuel drag racer and he told me that even the best tire gauges he's has go bad. He uses multiple as a "checks and balances" and frequently tosses one that is out of synch.

    So yeah, I have the analog one like above, but its definitely shot. I'm just over inflating a bit and taking air out on the trail as necessary now. The old tried and true thumb compression.

  12. #1012
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    7B Selkirks USA
    Posts
    686
    I have a short road approach to our trails. If I am getting bouncy pedal bob (on a full rigid) I know i need more air. Otherwise i keep them as soft as possible for traction. I too have heard the gauges are hit and miss. Having said that, i believe i shoot for about 5.5 psi by feel.

  13. #1013
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,576
    Overthinking this? No, not really, but each gauge will likely give a different value when measuring pressure. You can really go down the rabbit hole on standards and accuracy of the instruments used to measure. Most of that is not important, and the ROI of buying an expensive gauge and having it calibrated is non-existent for what we are doing.

    That is why it is helpful to take measurements on the same gauge. Mine might read 5psi when yours reads 4.5psi for the same pressure in your tire. If you are using somebody else's gauge, expect that you'll need to find tune the pressure on the trail. This is the same with shock pumps. It's always easier to remove (tire) pressure on the trail than it is to add it, so with an unknown gauge, maybe start high.

    I hope that's helpful.

    Seth

    Sent from my SM-N970U using Tapatalk

  14. #1014
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Gateway to The Greens
    Posts
    491
    Well I did a little more digging and it turns out my friend's digital gauge has a range of 0-100 psi so I'm pretty sure its accuracy at low pressure is pretty questionable. I looked on Meiser's website and found this:

    "The mechanical accuracy rating is ± 2% from 30% to 60% of scale and ± 3% below 30% and above 60%."

    Mechanical gauges are typically most accurate in the middle of their range. Digital gauges are similar but I haven't been able to find any specific stats for standard gauges. But, it does seem that a dedicated low pressure gauge(1-15 psi) is ideal for fat tires. So, I'm sticking with the Meiser and what it's telling me.

  15. #1015
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Halfway Between the Gutter and the Stars
    Posts
    3,275
    Techno weenies. Just give them a poke with your thumb and make a decision based on yesterday's ride and current snow conditions.
    You are what you eat.
    ---------------------------------------------------
    There's no such thing as bad snow, just shitty skiers.

  16. #1016
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Granite, UT
    Posts
    767
    Quote Originally Posted by Beaver View Post
    Techno weenies. Just give them a poke with your thumb and make a decision based on yesterday's ride and current snow conditions.
    THIS /\ If I spent this much time contemplating tire pressures, I'd never get a ride in. I can't remember the last time I used a tire gauge. Just fingerbang it and be done.

  17. #1017
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Gateway to The Greens
    Posts
    491
    Some like using gauges and others prefer to “fingerbang”. To each their own...


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  18. #1018
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    409
    I had 2 fattystripper liners go bad within 2 weeks of one another (18mos use). Not real happy about that. Each one developed a slow leak, then critical failure a week later.

    Tire Gauge: I run the Accu-Gauge 0-15psi. I also have a Topeak Digital. The Topeak is grossly inaccurate at low pressures. It also doesn't differentiate between 2.2psi and 2.9psi (both are "2psi", at which point it goes to 1 or 3psi LOL). Analog FTW. I have a friend who bought the same Accu-Gauge, but it won't read higher than 2.5psi, the needle sticks. So 3 and 7psi read the same. Had to exchange it thru Amzn.

  19. #1019
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    4,679
    Over in the EC thread we're discussing the 27.5 vs 26 fatty. What'd y'all kooks have to say about that?

  20. #1020
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Southeast New York
    Posts
    6,923
    For snow and sand I'm going to go 26 x 4.5 or bigger. It's not just about width it's volume, and 27.5 has shorter sidewalls and less volume so the sidewalls can't compress and spread and create that wider footprint that's necessary for "float" and traction on softer terrain.

  21. #1021
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Can/USA
    Posts
    852
    i've been happy with my 26" fatty... no reason for me to switch to 27.5", although i probably thought that before i bought a 27.5" full suspension

  22. #1022
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    BFE
    Posts
    442
    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover View Post
    For snow and sand I'm going to go 26 x 4.5 or bigger. It's not just about width it's volume, and 27.5 has shorter sidewalls and less volume so the sidewalls can't compress and spread and create that wider footprint that's necessary for "float" and traction on softer terrain.
    Exactly, even then depending on conditions, it may not be enough.

  23. #1023
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    4,679
    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover View Post
    For snow and sand I'm going to go 26 x 4.5 or bigger. It's not just about width it's volume, and 27.5 has shorter sidewalls and less volume so the sidewalls can't compress and spread and create that wider footprint that's necessary for "float" and traction on softer terrain.
    Yeah, that's just a gut feeling and I'm not disagreeing, but often science proves gut feelings wrong.

    I'd like to see a true comparison. You have a short and wider surface area on the ground in 26" and a longer skinnier surface area on the 27.5". So what's the pounds per square inch or lbf/in2 and how does that relate to flotaion when momentum is applied.

    158 Snowboard vs 191 skis?

  24. #1024
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Southeast New York
    Posts
    6,923
    IMO the difference is how it spreads the weight even if it's the same psi. With the weight applied in a linear fashion you're compressing the same material for longer leading to a deeper "rut".

  25. #1025
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    4,679
    Was just at a shop down the street. They have Salsa, Special, and Giant fattys. The Giant is a 27.5 and the sidewall was the same height at the 26'ers. It was also a 4.5 width. It was huge.

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