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  1. #651
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    in the trench
    Posts
    15,769
    Thanks for the Sierra Ferrel stoke in here. Holy shit she's amazing. Im hooked on it.What a voice

    Sent from my SM-S711W using TGR Forums mobile app

  2. #652
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3,078

  3. #653
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    in the trench
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuco View Post
    Good one, adding to the playlist

    Got on to this last night. Apparently he's written for a lot of big acts

    https://youtu.be/0uLg84a9WF4?si=jOG-ClQD45xrEkqF

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  4. #654
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    50 miles E of Paradise
    Posts
    15,738
    Never thought of Delbert McClinton as a country artist, but I think this song works

  5. #655
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Truckee, CA
    Posts
    8,919
    Had no idea that Shel Silverstein was an instrumental member of the Outlaw Country movement back in the sixties…

    From his Wikipedia page:
    “Silverstein studied briefly at Chicago College of Performing Arts at Roosevelt University. Silverstein was associated with the outlaw country movement.[12] His musical output included a large catalog of songs; a number of them were hits for other artists, such as the rock group Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show.[10] He wrote Tompall Glaser's highest-charting solo single "Put Another Log on the Fire", "One's on the Way" and "Hey Loretta" (both hits for Loretta Lynn, in 1971 and 1973 respectively), and "25 Minutes to Go", sung by Johnny Cash, about a man on death row with each line counting down one minute closer. Lynn recorded five songs written by Silverstein. Lynn's producer Owen Bradley once said Silverstein's style of song writing was the most similar to that of Lynn's own writing. Silverstein also wrote Cash's biggest hit, "A Boy Named Sue", as well as "The Unicorn", first recorded by Silverstein in 1962 but better known in its version by The Irish Rovers. Other songs co-written by Silverstein include "The Taker" written with Kris Kristofferson and recorded by Waylon Jennings, and a sequel to "A Boy Named Sue" titled "Father of a Boy Named Sue", which is less known, but he performed the song on television on The Johnny Cash Show. He also penned a lesser known song titled "Fuck 'em."[13][14]
    He wrote the lyrics and music for most of the Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show songs on their first few albums, including "The Cover of "Rolling Stone"", "Freaker's Ball", "Sylvia's Mother", "The Things I Didn't Say" and "Don't Give a Dose to the One You Love Most".[10] He wrote many of the songs performed by Bobby Bare, including "Rosalie's Good Eats Café", "The Mermaid", "The Winner", "Daddy What If", "Warm and Free", and "Tequila Sheila". He co-wrote with Baxter Taylor "Marie Laveau". The third album by Tompall Glaser contained eight songs by Silverstein and three by Silverstein and others.
    Silverstein's "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan", first recorded by Dr. Hook in 1975, was re-recorded by Lee Hazlewood (1976), Marianne Faithfull (1979), Belinda Carlisle (1996), and Bobby Bare (2005) and later featured in the films Montenegro and Thelma & Louise. "Queen of the Silver Dollar" was first recorded by Dr. Hook on their 1972 album Sloppy Seconds, and later by Doyle Holly (on his 1973 album Doyle Holly), Emmylou Harris (on her 1975 album Pieces of the Sky) and Dave & Sugar (on their 1976 album Dave & Sugar).
    Silverstein composed original music for several films and displayed a musical versatility in these projects, playing guitar, piano, saxophone and trombone. He wrote "In the Hills of Shiloh", a poignant song about the aftermath of the American Civil War, recorded by The New Christy Minstrels, Judy Collins, Bobby Bare, and others. The soundtrack of the 1970 film Ned Kelly features Silverstein songs performed by Waylon Jennings, Kris Kristofferson, and others.[9] He also co-wrote with Waylon the song 'A Long Time Ago'.
    In addition, Silverstein wrote "Hey Nelly Nelly", a 1960s-era folk song recorded by Judy Collins.[15]
    Silverstein had a popular following on Dr. Demento's radio show. Among his better-known comedy songs were "Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout (Would Not Take the Garbage Out)", "The Smoke-Off" (a tale of a contest to determine who could roll—or smoke—marijuana joints faster), "I Got Stoned and I Missed It" and "Stacy Brown Got Two." He wrote the 1962 song "Boa Constrictor", sung by a person who is being swallowed by a snake. The latter song was recorded by the folk group Peter, Paul and Mary, and also by Johnny Cash for his 1966 album Everybody Loves a Nut.
    One of Silverstein's last musical projects was Old Dogs, a 1998 album with songs about getting old, all of which Silverstein wrote or co-wrote.[16]
    A longtime friend of singer-songwriter Pat Dailey, Silverstein collaborated with him on the posthumously released Underwater Land album (2002). It contains 17 children's songs written and produced by Silverstein and sung by Dailey (with Silverstein joining him on a few tracks). The album features art by Silverstein.[17]
    He was a friend of Chicago songwriter Steve Goodman, for whom he wrote the final verse of "What Have You Done For Me Lately?" (refusing a songwriting credit for his contribution).
    In 2010, Bobby Bare and his son Bobby Bare Jr produced a CD called Twistable, Turnable Man: A Musical Tribute to the Songs of Shel Silverstein which was released on Sugar Hill Records. Other artists who recorded Silverstein's songs include the Brothers Four, Andrew Bird, My Morning Jacket and Bobby Bare Jr.[18][19]”
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    https://www.blizzard-tecnica.com/us/en

  6. #656
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    50 miles E of Paradise
    Posts
    15,738
    Just heard this from our little village’s most famous songwriter

  7. #657
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    14,949
    Quote Originally Posted by TBS View Post
    Never thought of Delbert McClinton as a country artist, but I think this song works
    I don’t get it, if Delbert isn’t country I don’t know what he is.


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  8. #658
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    50 miles E of Paradise
    Posts
    15,738
    Here’s his most successful song - sounds like blues to me

  9. #659
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Babylon
    Posts
    13,562
    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    I don’t get it, if Delbert isn’t country I don’t know what he is.


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  10. #660
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Where the sheets have no stains
    Posts
    22,295


    Daniel Donato. New Country crossed with a little Jerry.
    I have been in this State for 30 years and I am willing to admit that I am part of the problem.

    "Happiest years of my life were earning < $8.00 and hour, collecting unemployment every spring and fall, no car, no debt and no responsibilities. 1984-1990 Park City UT"

  11. #661
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    14,949
    Quote Originally Posted by Woodsy View Post
    Pretty much


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  12. #662
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    8530' MST/200' EST
    Posts
    4,436
    SLC Folks, Country adacent/post country/etc band The Droptines is at the Garage 6/15, definitely worth checking out.
    "If we can't bring the mountain to the party, let's bring the PARTY to the MOUNTAIN!"

  13. #663
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    1,346
    Jumped on Apple Music to hunt some of these recent postings down and was hit in the face with their “100 Best Albums of All-time” new stunt.

    Holy fuck. Kids these days. One country album in the whole lot. Kacey M. Golden Hour. List was full of Drake, Kendrick, and even Frank Ocean. Oh and there was no Rolling Stones either…or Ray Charles. Also, I will admit I love the hell out of Swift’s 1989 but it belongs nowhere in the top 20.

    I know these things are generally click bait argument fodder, even when Rolling Stone started printing them back in the day, but come on.

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