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  1. #326
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    5,374
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    That looks like a rad trail. I'm super jealous of your lack of brushy ground level bullshit to hack through.
    I've ridden some tahoe trails and thought, "Did the trailbuilders just drag a rake for all the pine needles one afternoon behind a dirtbike and then put up an 'open' sign that night?" So easy.

  2. #327
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,209
    Quote Originally Posted by muted View Post
    I've ridden some tahoe trails and thought, "Did the trailbuilders just drag a rake for all the pine needles one afternoon behind a dirtbike and then put up an 'open' sign that night?" So easy.
    The name of the game when you are trying to build out miles of trail by yourself by hand is to find the natural routes, open hardwoods, natural benches, and where "Building" will be required, route your trail closest to available materials, which in my case is almost always stashes of rocks and good dirt to mine. Cherry-pick the landscape, stay on ridges ect. Being in the foothills vs the spine of the Greens a short distance away makes this pretty do-able. Next project is to reclaim another old, bench cut farm road that traverses under the peak of our little Mtn of Paine. It will eliminate an almost impossible (for me) climb to the ridge that connects us to the pod of trails a few miles north. It will be a buff, screaming fast DH on the return. A little clearing and a small section of hand bench will add another mile of trail. Probably 20 hours total work. Low hanging fruits FTW.

  3. #328
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    4,312
    I finished one section of new last month and now I'm focusing on reroutes of existing for the rest of the year. Goal is obviously to make what I already have mo bettah. A lot of my first gen stuff is...well first gen. I've certainly learned a lot over the past 15 yrs and the bikes have changed so much that the lines are different too. ...and the chainsaw changes everything!

  4. #329
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    8,571
    Built up a landing on this little shark finny thing.

    (Edited because I typed the wrong marine mammal trail feature)
    Last edited by toast2266; 07-02-2019 at 03:16 PM.

  5. #330
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    4,312
    Couple hours with the saw today and the rough in for the addition (which started as a simple reroute...but got out of hand) is complete. Need to establish the lines with a little blow and some raking.

  6. #331
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    805
    We have vine maple and blackberry bushes is abundance in my area. What tools do folks like for clearing out vines and bushy plants? Shears seem like a lot of work to keep sharp and non-sticky, and a machete doesnt seem like a great option either... but maybe im wrong?

  7. #332
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    In a parallel universe
    Posts
    4,349
    If you are rolling power tools, a Stihl Kombi with the adjustable hedge trimmer works amazingly well for that sort of thing...
    Otherwise a good pruning shear and lopper are effective (Felco, Fiskars, etc.) albeit more time consuming.

  8. #333
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Missoula
    Posts
    1,330
    Chainsaw, hedge trimmers, gas powered trimmer?

    Went on the sheep mountain trail clearing day last weekend, it was long. We went over the top and down the other side and then out the main rattlesnake corridor, which made for about 20 miles and took nearly 7 hours. We probably could have used 2-3 more people and another saw to get through that a little more quickly. Still, 6 of us on bikes with two chainsaws cleared 10mi of trail in a few hours. Would have been much harder with handsaws on foot.






    Sheep mountain, about 7600ft, which we came over from the other side.



    More down trees on the way up than I expected. My garmin recorded 2.7mi and it took us 2 hours 20min to get up there. Then it was onto the actual trail we went to clear, called 1513. This had been all but abandoned until mtb missoula went in and cleared it out a few years ago, offering another trail option when you get up to sheep.

    View from the top, looking north into the upper rattlesnake



    The mountain across the valley on the right is mineral peak, and one group went toward the top of that to clear a trail that comes down the side facing us. Another went down the center of that valley to the right, and we descended the ridge in the foreground to the left. Then we all went left to that big valley (the rattlesnake main corridor). Big mountain back there is Mcloed and on the right way in the back you can sort of see the missions.







    Also cheap flat pedals with boots in the wet is not confidence inspiring. Also we were the last ones down by a few hours. But there was pizza and beer waiting.

  9. #334
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    805
    Quote Originally Posted by ACH View Post
    If you are rolling power tools, a Stihl Kombi with the adjustable hedge trimmer works amazingly well for that sort of thing...
    Otherwise a good pruning shear and lopper are effective (Felco, Fiskars, etc.) albeit more time consuming.
    It would have to be electric or manual. I need it for a place "in-town" and would rather not draw attention, even though im pretty sure the neighbors dont mind. Thanks for the advice.

  10. #335
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    8,571
    Quote Originally Posted by jamal View Post
    Chainsaw, hedge trimmers, gas powered trimmer?

    Went on the sheep mountain trail clearing day last weekend, it was long. We went over the top and down the other side and then out the main rattlesnake corridor, which made for about 20 miles and took nearly 7 hours. We probably could have used 2-3 more people and another saw to get through that a little more quickly. Still, 6 of us on bikes with two chainsaws cleared 10mi of trail in a few hours. Would have been much harder with handsaws on foot.
    Nice work. Keeping that trail clear is a lot of work.

  11. #336
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Paradise
    Posts
    3,760
    Quote Originally Posted by DaveVt View Post
    The name of the game when you are trying to build out miles of trail by yourself by hand is to find the natural routes, open hardwoods, natural benches, and where "Building" will be required, route your trail closest to available materials, which in my case is almost always stashes of rocks and good dirt to mine. Cherry-pick the landscape, stay on ridges ect. Being in the foothills vs the spine of the Greens a short distance away makes this pretty do-able. Next project is to reclaim another old, bench cut farm road that traverses under the peak of our little Mtn of Paine. It will eliminate an almost impossible (for me) climb to the ridge that connects us to the pod of trails a few miles north. It will be a buff, screaming fast DH on the return. A little clearing and a small section of hand bench will add another mile of trail. Probably 20 hours total work. Low hanging fruits FTW.
    You can't really do that down over here. The name of the game in the Four Corners region is get the water off the trail as quickly as possible. Ridge lines, old road beds and natural benches larger than 36 inches without a lot of grade reversals don't shed water so good. Poor soil and an arid climate that gets seriously heavy, energetic bursts of moisture doesn't do so good with more than 20 to 30 feet (30 tops is my general rule) of flow down the tread.
    dirtbag, not a dentist

  12. #337
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    4,312
    Latest addition required a ton of saw work on blowdowns. The benefit is the dirt they provide. Its tough to find good dirt in our woods digging by hand.

  13. #338
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    North Vancouver/Whistler
    Posts
    11,305
    Cleared some blowdown so these old trails can be ridden

  14. #339
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    1,531
    Looks GMG-ish

  15. #340
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    cow hampshire
    Posts
    4,312
    Quote Originally Posted by evdog View Post
    Looks GMG-ish
    Looks greasy!

  16. #341
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    North Vancouver/Whistler
    Posts
    11,305
    Nice to have rain. Reloamed old trails

    Before & After

  17. #342
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    North Vancouver/Whistler
    Posts
    11,305
    Opening up new trail. Buranus to Mianus

  18. #343
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    In a parallel universe
    Posts
    4,349
    Quote Originally Posted by LeeLau View Post
    Opening up new trail. Buranus to Mianus
    Iím seeing a theme.

    :::

    Did a little dirt work of my own today.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  19. #344
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    North Vancouver/Whistler
    Posts
    11,305
    Making rock slabs great again


  20. #345
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    805
    I have a small creek i need to cross on a trail im building. The creek has worn the earth away so that it is only 4'-5' accross, but also probably 4' deep. I cant use power tools. I was thinking about cutting a pallet in half, connecting the halves lengthwise and nailing some 2x4s to the bottom for stability. All the downed trees in the area are rotting or too large to move or cut with hand tools.

    Any tips or tricks folks can offer?

  21. #346
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    8,571
    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    I have a small creek i need to cross on a trail im building. The creek has worn the earth away so that it is only 4'-5' accross, but also probably 4' deep. I cant use power tools. I was thinking about cutting a pallet in half, connecting the halves lengthwise and nailing some 2x4s to the bottom for stability. All the downed trees in the area are rotting or too large to move or cut with hand tools.

    Any tips or tricks folks can offer?
    If you can get a pallet to the site, why not bring in some actual, worthwhile materials? A couple of pressure treated fence posts to use as stringers, and then use whatever planks your budget allows for to deck it. Cut everything off site and just nail it together.

  22. #347
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Ogden
    Posts
    5,573
    Hill side has been sluffing away for years making the trail narrower and narrower. High use area by hikers and bikers. Built the retaining wall and seeded the slide area. Iíll have to add finished product photos later.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  23. #348
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    1,531
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    If you can get a pallet to the site, why not bring in some actual, worthwhile materials? A couple of pressure treated fence posts to use as stringers, and then use whatever planks your budget allows for to deck it. Cut everything off site and just nail it together.
    Agree with Toast. Pallet might be easier initially but it won't last very long and will look pretty ghetto.

  24. #349
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    14,821

  25. #350
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Carbondale
    Posts
    10,423
    Lee, so much of the work you post up.. makes my ribs hurt just looking at it.. I suck at skinny stuff lol.

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