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  1. #39026
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    People that waste tons of water in a drought-ridden West just so they have green lawns annoy me.

  2. #39027
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon3 View Post
    People that waste tons of water in a drought-ridden West just so they have green lawns annoy me.
    Yeah, the whole lawn culture thing is kinda BS, especially in the west

  3. #39028
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon3 View Post
    People that waste tons of water in a drought-ridden West just so they have green lawns annoy me.
    Quote Originally Posted by Supermoon View Post
    Yeah, the whole lawn culture thing is kinda BS, especially in the west
    I prefer to view lawns as slack in the system just waiting to be taken out.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin
    "I'd eat a bag of Dicks and wash it down with a Coke any day." - iceman

  4. #39029
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldnew_guy View Post
    People that fail to yield to pedestrians in a crosswalk should face DUI level consequences.
    So 80% of the drivers in my town.

    I'm cool with that.

  5. #39030
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    Quote Originally Posted by Supermoon View Post
    Yeah, the whole lawn culture thing is kinda BS, especially in the west
    not to mention, avid weekly car washers

  6. #39031
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    Quote Originally Posted by Supermoon View Post
    Yeah, the whole lawn culture thing is kinda BS, especially in the west
    Yup. Why everybody out West isn't xeriscaping is beyond me. Since I bought my house, Ive ripped out around 1/2 my grass and was either covered up by deck or replaced with rock, cacti and other asst desert plants. Has made this drought and heat no problem whatsoever. Heck, the plants are thriving in it and in full bloom. It's not hard or all that expensive, looks gorgeous, and reduced my water use a LOT! Why people in drought prone areas demand a lawn that looks like a perfect Scottish golf course is kind of crazy. Totally fighting mother nature the whole time. Lol.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using TGR Forums mobile app

  7. #39032
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon3 View Post
    People that waste tons of water in a drought-ridden West just so they have green lawns annoy me.
    Amen.

    I’ve been kicking around the idea of starting a biz that would remove lawns and replace with xeriscape or garden etc. Our city is potentially going to give an incentive/refund to people that tear out their lawn.

    I have one neighbor that fucking soaks her yard constantly. Grass is thick and green but then she complains about her water bill! Uh, yea! What a waste.
    It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. –Ernest Hemingway

  8. #39033
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    Educate me on watering on my location.

    Missoula valley, so I assume my lawn watering does back into the Missoula aquifer. ??? Worst case it goes into the Clark Fork and moves downstream to another user.

    Obviously different then watering in Arizona or Vegas. Am I missing something else in the equation? Or, is it an OK scenario in areas vastly upstream?

    Serious question and willing to learn.

    Sent from my SM-S908U using Tapatalk

  9. #39034
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    Apparently there is a shortage of workers in the smoked salmon/lox industry. I've been unable to get lox for some time now and when I asked the fish guy at my local market about it he said even with starting pay of $50/hr they still can't get workers so no lox.

    Not happy.
    When you see something that is not right, not just, not fair, you have a moral obligation to say something. To do something." Rep. John Lewis


    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  10. #39035
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    Is that $50 an hour for smoking, or gutting?



  11. #39036
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iowagriz View Post
    Educate me on watering on my location.

    Missoula valley, so I assume my lawn watering does back into the Missoula aquifer. ??? Worst case it goes into the Clark Fork and moves downstream to another user.

    Obviously different then watering in Arizona or Vegas. Am I missing something else in the equation? Or, is it an OK scenario in areas vastly upstream?

    Serious question and willing to learn.

    Sent from my SM-S908U using Tapatalk
    No water shortage and wonderful temps where you're at. You're good. Water away and feel no guilt.

    People living in the drought-stricken, desert climes on the other hand...

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using TGR Forums mobile app

  12. #39037
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iowagriz View Post
    Educate me on watering on my location.

    Missoula valley, so I assume my lawn watering does back into the Missoula aquifer. ??? Worst case it goes into the Clark Fork and moves downstream to another user.
    The water doesn't go back into the system, it goes into growing grass. I have no judgement about your location since I don't know your level of drought, but how would it go back into the river or soak into the aquifer?

  13. #39038
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    The water doesn't go back into the system, it goes into growing grass. I have no judgement about your location since I don't know your level of drought, but how would it go back into the river or soak into the aquifer?
    Aquifers are naturally recharged by rainfall or other surface water that infiltrates into the ground. That said, in regions where groundwater use is greater than natural recharge rates, aquifers will be depleted over time and need to be artificially recharged through pits, furrows, or ditches, or by the creation of small dams in stream channels to detain and deflect surface runoff, thereby allowing it to infiltrate to the aquifer.
    When you see something that is not right, not just, not fair, you have a moral obligation to say something. To do something." Rep. John Lewis


    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  14. #39039
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  15. #39040
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    EWA
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    FIFY



    Quote Originally Posted by senior researcher View Post
    When you see something that is not right, not just, not fair, you have a moral obligation to say something. To do something." Rep. John Lewis


    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  16. #39041
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    Regarding watering lawns, it's a complex question that is dependent on a lot of things. Montucky's "you're good" isn't necessarily the correct answer, because the entire west has drought and water issues, not just the "desert southwest". But some areas do have abundant water that is not needed downstream, I have no idea about Missoula.

    Also, when you apply water to a lawn, a number of things happen. First, the growing of grass consumes some of the water. Some of the water is lost to evaporation during application. Those are both consumptive uses. And some, the water that soaks into the ground and isn't used by the grass and isn't evaportated off the soil, does recharge the aquifer below. What kind of aquifer it recharges, at what rate it recharges it, etc, are location specific. So some of the water is completely consumed, but some does replenish the aquifer.

    Now, what "recharging the aquifer" means is also complex. First, where is the water coming from, is it coming from a stream system or a non-tributary aquifer? Most likely the former. Is the aquifer it's recharging part of the stream system it came from? What is the timing of that recharge, when can it be reused? And what is the impact to the municipality that is supplying the water to you?

    When people excessively flush their toilets or run their faucet, it's often referred to as "wasting water" but it isn't really doing that. It is wasting your municipality's water right, with whatever long term implications that might have for the municipality's water planning and resources, but the water itself is going to flow downstream and be used by someone else, it's not being "wasted" because the use -- running the water into your sewer drain -- isn't consumptive. But you are certainly wasting energy, because you're dumping treated water back into the system and requiring it to be treated again, and you are wasting your municipality's resources by requiring that they supply you with more water than you needed.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin
    "I'd eat a bag of Dicks and wash it down with a Coke any day." - iceman

  17. #39042
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    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post
    Aquifers are naturally recharged by rainfall or other surface water that infiltrates into the ground. That said, in regions where groundwater use is greater than natural recharge rates, aquifers will be depleted over time and need to be artificially recharged through pits, furrows, or ditches, or by the creation of small dams in stream channels to detain and deflect surface runoff, thereby allowing it to infiltrate to the aquifer.
    I would think you’d have to be overwatering quite a bit to get it to have any kind of recharge effect on an aquifer?


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  18. #39043
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    I would think you’d have to be overwatering quite a bit to get it to have any kind of recharge effect on an aquifer?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    As Danno's post says it depends on a lot of factors. For instance irrigating my fields would contribute more to recharging than when I irrigate my lawn due to the amount of time/water. How much more I don't know but there are rules and reporting requirements plus we have a water master who will shut you off if necessary.
    When you see something that is not right, not just, not fair, you have a moral obligation to say something. To do something." Rep. John Lewis


    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  19. #39044
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    Ah, missed Danno’s post. Thanks for the details.


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  20. #39045
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    Generally speaking, watering a lawn shouldn't be recharging an aquifer because that probably means you're significantly overwatering. Plus, most overwatering of lawns that I see returns to the aquifer via storm drains, due to surface runoff. But as a concept, if you water anything in the ground -- crops or grass -- the idea is the same. Some gets consumed by the plant, some gets "consumed" by evaporation, and the rest returns to the system in some fashion, either as surface runoff or groundwater recharge.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin
    "I'd eat a bag of Dicks and wash it down with a Coke any day." - iceman

  21. #39046
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    Dec 2012
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    I can still smell Poutine.
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    The average Joe doesn't think about water rights here in the rural northeast because in a lot of places, we have too much water. Until we don't. The current drought map for New England that was posted in that other thread was interesting, alarming, and illuminating.

  22. #39047
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    Quote Originally Posted by riser4 View Post
    The average Joe doesn't think about water rights here in the rural northeast because in a lot of places, we have too much water. Until we don't. The current drought map for New England that was posted in that other thread was interesting, alarming, and illuminating.
    That and the water laws are completely different.

  23. #39048
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    Quote Originally Posted by abraham View Post
    That and the water laws are completely different.
    No shit Sherlock. Please re-read what I posted. That was implied. My apologies for not painting it in 40 foot high letters.

  24. #39049
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    Feb 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by MontuckyFried View Post
    Yup. Why everybody out West isn't xeriscaping is beyond me. Since I bought my house, Ive ripped out around 1/2 my grass and was either covered up by deck or replaced with rock, cacti and other asst desert plants. Has made this drought and heat no problem whatsoever. Heck, the plants are thriving in it and in full bloom. It's not hard or all that expensive, looks gorgeous, and reduced my water use a LOT! Why people in drought prone areas demand a lawn that looks like a perfect Scottish golf course is kind of crazy. Totally fighting mother nature the whole time. Lol.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using TGR Forums mobile app
    Your question can be answered in three letters....HOA

  25. #39050
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    Oct 2010
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    Shit that annoys you

    Quote Originally Posted by Danno View Post
    Generally speaking, watering a lawn shouldn't be recharging an aquifer because that probably means you're significantly overwatering. Plus, most overwatering of lawns that I see returns to the aquifer via storm drains, due to surface runoff. But as a concept, if you water anything in the ground -- crops or grass -- the idea is the same. Some gets consumed by the plant, some gets "consumed" by evaporation, and the rest returns to the system in some fashion, either as surface runoff or groundwater recharge.
    I’d say aquifer recharge from residential use is practically nil. In most western places if you dig down two feet in the middle of watering season, you’ll still find bone dry soil (true here in Spokane and we’re certainly not the desert SW). So water that is put on the lawn and absorbed into the first few inches of soil will generally go into the grass or evaporate over time. Actually it’ll pretty much all evaporate because that’s what’s happening to your green grass too.

    And water that goes through the water treatment plant (most runoff and all sewer) probably gets dumped into the river and goes away, not recharging the aquifer.

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