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  1. #1
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    Cinema Tarantino: The Making of Pulp Fiction

    http://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/...?src=longreads

    "According to Quentin Tarantino, by Wensley Clarkson, his constant use of the f-word in his script True Romance caused one studio rep to write to Cathryn Jaymes, his early manager:

    Dear Fucking Cathryn,

    How dare you send me this fucking piece of shit. You must be out of your fucking mind. You want to know how I feel about it? Here’s your fucking piece of shit back. Fuck you."

  2. #2
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    That ^^^ is a fucking great read!

    Here's almost 3 hours of free-ranging discussion with QT.

    Last edited by fomofo; 07-22-2021 at 12:10 PM.

  3. #3
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    Great article. Thx
    I’ve just decided to be a middle aged somewhat depressed somewhat anxious fucktard until the end.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Core Shot View Post
    Great article. Thx
    great article but weird to read about Wienstein in a positive light

  5. #5
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    He was responsible for a lot of good movies made. A total asshole and deviant, but, the film business is much worse off without him and his brother.

  6. #6
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    Tarantino was going to have Brad Pitt as the principal star, which would have marked their third teaming after Inglourious Basterds and Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. There were rumors that many from the casts of his past films might take part, and Sony was preparing to make the film after doing such a superb job on the last one.

    Word is that Tarantino had rewritten his script, which delayed the start of production. But this is his 10th and final film, and Tarantino simply decided The Movie Critic will not be it.


    Quentin Tarantino Drops ‘The Movie Critic’ As His Final Film
    The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.

  7. #7
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    Cinema Tarantino: The Making of Pulp Fiction

    I Hope the script gets leaked or released at least. Sounds interesting. I wish he didn’t have this self imposed 10 movie cap. He’s just a bit older than me and surely has a lot left
    Last edited by mcski; 04-20-2024 at 12:34 PM.

  8. #8
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    I appreciate him wanting to go out on a high note.

    But also, given the percentage of celebrities who announce their retirement and then don’t retire, I wouldn’t be surprised if he made more than 10 films…

    Personally, I’d go for a Tufnel…
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    https://www.blizzard-tecnica.com/us/en

  9. #9
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    Maybe after #10 he'll create something for The Sphere in Vegas? ;-)

    Personally, I have faith it'll be worth the wait, whether it ends up being his last or not. Every one of his films so far has been fantastic, including Death Proof, which I think is at the bottom of most "Tarantino ranked" lists, but is one my favorites.

    Personally whatever he does I'd just like to see Nic Cage and Jim Carrey in the mix somewhere, even if only in small yet memorable roles a la Walken in Pulp.
    The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dookeyXXX View Post
    I appreciate him wanting to go out on a high note.

    But also, given the percentage of celebrities who announce their retirement and then don’t retire, I wouldn’t be surprised if he made more than 10 films…

    Personally, I’d go for a Tufnel…
    Agreed - it's silly to have this 10 film limit, and as a result I think it puts too much unnecessary pressure on #10 as well.
    I ski 135 degree chutes switch to the road.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by fomofo View Post
    Personally whatever he does I'd just like to see Nic Cage and Jim Carrey in the mix somewhere, even if only in small yet memorable roles a la Walken in Pulp.
    Actors off the top of my head who I’d like to see in a QT film:
    Bokeem Woodbine
    Sam Rockwell
    Ian McShane
    Riley Keough
    Billie Lourd
    Kristen Stewart
    Willem Dafoe
    Owen Wilson
    Gretchen Moll
    Paul Bettany
    Ariana DeBose
    Chow Yun Fat
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    https://www.blizzard-tecnica.com/us/en

  12. #12
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    .... Jason Statham, Jeremy Irons (may be too late), .......

  13. #13
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    William Devane, too.
    Kinda surprised he hasn’t made it into a QT film given how much QT loves Rolling Thunder
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    https://www.blizzard-tecnica.com/us/en

  14. #14
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    I’d like to see Tom Cruise in one of his films, kinda like when he did Magnolia with PT Anderson and snagged an Oscar nomination.
    I ski 135 degree chutes switch to the road.

  15. #15
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    Cinema Tarantino: The Making of Pulp Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by dookeyXXX View Post
    William Devane, too.
    Kinda surprised he hasn’t made it into a QT film given how much QT loves Rolling Thunder
    Saw a pic of him recently and he look pretty aged. I think that ship has sailed a while ago

    I’m goin w Tony Hale for a QT role

  16. #16
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    Andrew Dice Clay…
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    https://www.blizzard-tecnica.com/us/en

  17. #17
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    Ooooohhhh!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by dookeyXXX View Post
    Andrew Dice Clay…
    he's too busy with the 'gram seeing if people recognize him out in public

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by dookeyXXX View Post
    Andrew Dice Clay…
    All kinds of possibilities there! He was pretty good in Blue Jasmine.
    The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.

  20. #20
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    My vote is Clive Owen.

  21. #21
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    David Foster Wallace dissects QT vs Lynch (excerpt from Wallace's exceptional essay "David Lynch Keeps his Head" from A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again (1996)).

    "The Band-Aid on the neck of Pulp Fictions Marcellus Wallace—unexplained, visually incongruous, and featured prominently in three separate set-ups—is textbook Lynch. So are the long, self-consciously mundane dialogues on pork, foot massages, TV pilots, etc. that punctuate Pulp Fiction’s violence, a violence whose creepy/comic stylization is also resoundingly Lynchian. The peculiar narrative tone of Tarantino’s films—the thing that makes them seem at once strident and obscure, not-quite-clear in a haunting way—is Lynch’s tone; Lynch invented this tone. It seems to me fair to say that the commercial Hollywood phenomenon that is Mr. Quentin Tarantino would not exist without David Lynch as a touchstone, a set of allusive codes and contexts in the viewer’s deep-brain core. In a way, what Tarantino’s done with the French New Wave and with Lynch is what Pat Boone did with Little Richard and Fats Domino: he’s found (rather ingeniously) a way to take what is ragged and distinctive and menacing about their work and homogenize it, churn it until it’s smooth and cool and hygienic enough for mass consumption. Reservoir Dogs, for example, with its comically banal lunch-chatter, creepily otiose code names, and intrusive soundtrack of campy pop from decades past, is Lynch made commercial, i.e. faster, linearer, and with what was idiosyncratically surreal now made fashionably (i.e. “hiply”) surreal.

    ...And it is also to say that David Lynch, at age 50, is a better, more complex, more interesting director than any of the hip young “rebels” making violently ironic films for New Line and Miramax today. It is particularly to say that—even without considering recent cringers like Four Rooms or From Dusk to Dawn—D. Lynch is an exponentially better filmmaker than Q. Tarantino. For, unlike Tarantino, D. Lynch knows that an act of violence in an American film has, through repetition and desensitization, lost the ability to refer to anything but itself. This is why violence in Lynch’s films, grotesque and coldly stylized and symbolically heavy as it may be, is qualitatively different from Hollywood’s or even anti-Hollywood’s hip cartoon-violence. Lynch’s violence always tries to mean something.

    A better way to put what I just tried to say: Quentin Tarantino is interested in watching somebody’s ear getting cut off; David Lynch is interested in the ear."
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    https://www.blizzard-tecnica.com/us/en

  22. #22
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    The only connection I can see is Quentin looks a little like the angriest dog in the world. Grrrrrrrrrrr

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