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Thread: The end of film

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by The AD View Post
    I've got a TLR. More or less hipster than a rangefinder? It's a Yashica, though, not a Rolleiflex.
    If it's in good condition, I'll buy it. I have about 100 or so old film cameras and my collection is growing. Any interest?
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  2. #27
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    ...or get an F100 for under $200. Best bang for your buck there is and it uses the same lenses as your Nikon DSLR.

    Unless you shoot Canon in which case you're SOL.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by systemoverblow'd View Post
    If it's in good condition, I'll buy it. I have about 100 or so old film cameras and my collection is growing. Any interest?
    Nope. Sorry. It's one I'd like to hang on to.

  4. #29
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    Totally understandable. Just always putting out those feelers. Didn't even realize my parents kept the old Polaroid(with the original packaging). Always looking gor gems. I actually have an 8mm video camera with a loaded rack. It's been exposed but maybe something can be saved. How fucking dope would that be
    Brought to you by Carl's Jr.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by systemoverblow'd View Post
    Totally understandable. Just always putting out those feelers. Didn't even realize my parents kept the old Polaroid(with the original packaging). Always looking gor gems. I actually have an 8mm video camera with a loaded rack. It's been exposed but maybe something can be saved. How fucking dope would that be
    Not a video camera.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tippster View Post
    Not a video camera.
    film is dead... It's all ball bearings nowadays.
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  7. #32
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    Every once in a while I'll still noodle around with some film and this old Zeiss/Werra that I learned to shoot with. Click image for larger version. 

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    Nothing cool enough to share tho...

  8. #33
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    ^^ That is a cool little camera

    approx. how big is it? and even if you're not stoked about the content, does the quality of the exposure turn out well?

  9. #34
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    It's a smallish rangefinder and the IQ is very good. My copy is all manual and the meter has always been broken, so it's limited by my eye and skills. I've actually taken some great shots over the years, but they're framed and not digitized.

    See: http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Werra

    And: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YKBpD6tr6uo

  10. #35
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    Bump.
    Maybe the wrong thread, but this seemed to be important
    https://youtu.be/hHINDOtFH1A

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by bodywhomper View Post
    Bump.
    Maybe the wrong thread, but this seemed to be important
    https://youtu.be/hHINDOtFH1A
    Great video. Thanks for posting. This is truly art.

    Interesting that this thread is now 5.5 years old and film photography is still going strong and film is fairly easy to find.

  12. #37
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    I wouldn't say film is going strong as much as film still exists. You can buy some film, in a decreasing number of styles. Developing costs more. And the trend is ever downwards. I found some film recently and can't be bothered to pay the $11/roll the local shop charges to develop it after I shoot it. $20 a roll for 35mm slide to buy & develop is tough to stomach.

    The interesting part to me is the people interested in recreating historic pre-film photography, like this guy:
    https://petapixel.com/2018/01/11/bui...io-us-century/

  13. #38
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    To me it's pretty strong considering we were discussing it's death more than five years ago. At this point it's like vinyl records: obviously a niche market, but not going anywhere anytime soon.

  14. #39
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    Since getting a Pixel and the ability to produce adequate digital photos in almost all situations I started shooting slide again. I would agree that the cost is prohibitive but I rarely pull out the film camera these days except on situations when I feel that it's justified. The last time I remember shooting on that camera was during our backpacking trip for the eclipse.

    At this point I have years worth of B&W film I need to process. One of these days...

  15. #40
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    I hope at least medium and large format is available in the future, just for my own personal interests. I have a Mamiya RZ67 and Toyo 45 GII sitting around, but don't want to use them until I live somewhere permanently enough to set up a darkroom.

    Medium format digital is really nice, but nothing touches what that Toyo can do yet.

  16. #41
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    The end of film

    Get yourself your own darkroom set up and dev it yourself? Should be cheap to pick up used these days and developing isn't that hard in black and white for most people's specs
    Last edited by mcski; 04-17-2018 at 10:11 PM.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aenigma View Post
    I hope at least medium and large format is available in the future, just for my own personal interests. I have a Mamiya RZ67 and Toyo 45 GII sitting around, but don't want to use them until I live somewhere permanently enough to set up a darkroom.

    Medium format digital is really nice, but nothing touches what that Toyo can do yet.
    Image Lab in town rents lab space by the hour or for flat fees. He's totally set up for larger formats and alternative processes, good guy to boot.

    Sneaking into the labs on campus is also totally doable during the semester, all of my good friends in the department are graduating this semester but I can put you in contact for the Fall if you're interested.

  18. #43
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    Yeah, I know some people down there, too (prior degree was in photography at MSU). My schedule the past few years has been totally slammed with classes for a few months, then living in a teeny tiny trailer in Yellowstone the rest of the year, which has made some things difficult. I either want to be able to develop and print large format analogue at home, or just shoot digital...so basically all or nothing.

    Or maybe I'm just spoiled from having access to everything, and that hasn't quite worn off yet.

  19. #44
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    I went to art school for photography in the nineties. Loved working in the dark room, the smell of developer, dodging and burning, all the technical sides of the art. I'd spend hours in the lab. Photoshop 2.0 came out and was mind blowing, and I quickly realized that that was the future. Tried to get into it, got pretty good with the program, but just didn't love it the way I loved the darkroom. Dropped out to become a ski bum. I'm much better at that .

    I still have a really nice, and (used to be) expensive Nikon. Saw the same model at a pawn shop for $50. Ugh. Bought that camera with money I saved up over a whole summer.

  20. #45
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    I am probably a little younger than you all, but I spent a lot of time in high school and my first year of college in the darkroom. I can definitely still smell the developer if I think back far enough. I absolutely love digital compared to film though. I'm sure that's my personality and shooting-style coming through. I like to click the shutter a lot, so digital is great. Also being able to take photos and share them out instantly is pretty great.

    All that being said, I'd love to have an 8x10 setup and shoot really large format. The resolution you get on those is so amazing. I could never afford to do that digitally, so it would have to be film.

    I think film's time has come and gone, though. I don't think it will continue on for more than another 10 years at all. The processes and materials are too specialized to make any sense from a business standpoint at the scale it would settle in to. Polaroid film, maybe, but not large format film or papers.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Supermoon View Post
    II absolutely love digital compared to film though. I'm sure that's my personality and shooting-style coming through. I like to click the shutter a lot, so digital is great. Also being able to take photos and share them out instantly is pretty great.
    This is very true. I have a camera loaded with film and I'll take it with me quite a bit, but rarely use it. With film there's always the thought in your head "is this scene really worth my effort of getting the camera out and using the exposure on it?" With digital you just keep clicking and delete the ones that don't turn out. On the other hand shooting with film does make you think about what you're doing more.

  22. #47
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    The end of film

    That's the beauty and curse of digital. Good photography is all about volume. In the old days, that was challenging to do unless you were loaded w cash. Now, I can just snap away without a care while experimenting. Film will always be around in some form just like mosaics and oil painting are still around. Evolution of art just makes new techniques cheaper and faster for the mass use but the high end will always exist in some form. Kind of like construction materials

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by The AD View Post
    This is very true. I have a camera loaded with film and I'll take it with me quite a bit, but rarely use it. With film there's always the thought in your head "is this scene really worth my effort of getting the camera out and using the exposure on it?" With digital you just keep clicking and delete the ones that don't turn out. On the other hand shooting with film does make you think about what you're doing more.
    One nice thing about learning on film is I got practice working slowly, knowing my exposure, tweaking composition, etc. That makes digital even easier. I imagine it takes more work to not just chimp away for years if you start shooting on digital. I find myself falling into that trap sometimes. Just shoot something then adjust after. I find my best photos are more carefully planned before I click the shutter, though.

  24. #49
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    i have a friend who's a career photographer, with the career blastoff in the 80's and 90's. i haven't talked to him about this in a little while. about 5-6 years ago, he was still doing well selling his stock images, having some client-specific jobs, doing high quality imaging of art such as paintings, transitioning more into art-orientation, and starting to teach more (often focuses on disadvantages populations). back then, for clients, he could produce the same finished product with digital or with film, and, i believe, his rates were not different between the two. client perception was very different, especially with the expectations of what they could get from the use of digital, and the competition was greater because there were many more photographers in the industry. for 35mm-type cameras, he owns both (and many). for medium and larger format, he owns film cameras. if he has a client requiring digital medium format, he'll rent. he prefers film.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Supermoon View Post
    I think film's time has come and gone, though. I don't think it will continue on for more than another 10 years at all. The processes and materials are too specialized to make any sense from a business standpoint at the scale it would settle in to. Polaroid film, maybe, but not large format film or papers.
    nah, Ilford's got the b&w market sewn up and can chug along at their numbers for a bit (they are already small ~$30m/year in sales). they past the bk pain and sewed up assets for a song to support production. it's the polaroid/color stuff that's more likely to have problems.

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