Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 41
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,541

    60-ish Liter Backcountry Ski Pack? (Aether 60?)

    I'm looking for a pack capable for multiday trips, but which will most often be used on overnighters in the spring--e.g., for Shasta or the Eastern Sierra without a smaller summit pack. I have an Arc'teryx Khamiski, which purports to be 47 liters (~3000 ci). It's a great pack but a little bit too small. I always seem to end up having various crap that I can't fit and have to attach precariously to the exterior. I also have a Bora 80, which is also a great pack but too big for my purposes. Ideally, the pack I'm looking for would have the following features:

    • *60-65L capacity
    • *An ice axe loop
    • *A pouch/compartment for conveninet shovel and probe access
    • *A functional ski carry system (something comfortable for booting up a couloir and/or bushwacking in ski boots for a couple miles).
    • *A camelback system would be nice but isn't critical
    • *Doesn't break the bank


    The Osprey Aether 60 looks like an ideal candidate, but I'm a little concerned about the lack of a dedicated ski-carry system. I assume people just use the compression straps to A-frame the skis. Any thoughts on the ski-carry ability of this pack?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Hugh Conway Guest
    most any pack with an ice axe loop can be modified to carry skis off the back

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Banff
    Posts
    3,390
    I have the Aether 60. Best pack i've owned. Have used it for multi day ski mountaineering and some summer overnighters so far. For winter use the external pouch holds a shovel securely and is a good fit. Carrying skis works fine with the compression straps on the side. I would definately recommend this pack, and the weight is good for it's size. Lid also comes off and turns in to a fanny pack if you're in to that sort of thing.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    gone
    Posts
    1,136
    Quote Originally Posted by AKbruin View Post
    • *60-65L capacity
    • *An ice axe loop
    • *A pouch/compartment for conveninet shovel and probe access
    • *A functional ski carry system (something comfortable for booting up a couloir and/or bushwacking in ski boots for a couple miles).
    • *A camelback system would be nice but isn't critical
    • *Doesn't break the bank
    ive been using the arcteryx arrakis (50, but tall version, so its nearly 60l) for the same purpose, and it fits all your requirements, except it isnt cheap. basically great pack though, just overpriced and i cant get why it only has one ice-axe loop -.-
    other than that, a friend of mine uses the osprey as well and seems to have no problem carrying skis for a while. you can fix them very stable into the compression straps, even if i fear they might just rip out of the pack at some point, especially if youre carrying the boots in the bindings often/for longer periods...

    freak~[&]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    cb, co
    Posts
    3,649
    I had an aether pack and it was probably one of the worst packs I've ever owned. Just never fit me, and it definitely didn't carry skis well. Happy to have switched to a deuter pack. You might want to check this thread out, I was asking some of the same questions a couple years back. https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/s...ead.php/205757

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Squaw valley
    Posts
    2,519
    I had the aether 60 pack, and I like it, except for being pretty tall, my head kept hitting the top of the pack.
    O use now a 40 l pack and I attach two large pockets on each side.this allows me to overnight, and still have a good pack for peak skiing.
    I got the pockets at mchale packs directly.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    South Lake Tahoe
    Posts
    3,498
    I like my Cilo Gear 60L Pack. They make a shovel pouch you can buy seperately and attach to the pack. Adding straps for diagnol or pyramid ski carry is easy (PM me for details). Not to expensive and it can be stripped down for day trips.

    My BD Anarchist is also good for multidays, but it is a bit smaller at about 42l.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,541
    Thanks, folks.

    GoldenBoy- I did read your thread. Your and Rod's comments have convinced me that I need to get in a store with a weighted pack to ensure that it fits.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Providence RI
    Posts
    2,599
    Quote Originally Posted by harpo-the-skier View Post
    I like my Cilo Gear 60L Pack. They make a shovel pouch you can buy seperately and attach to the pack. Adding straps for diagnol or pyramid ski carry is easy (PM me for details). Not to expensive and it can be stripped down for day trips.
    Same here. I love every cilogear pack I have. I have 2 20L leader packs, the 45L, and the 60. Great packs that are super lightweight and comfy as heck.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    HELLsinki, Finland
    Posts
    3,708
    My pick will be BlueIce 60 l
    http://www.blueice.com/en/products/blue-ice-60l

    Pretty much the same as their 45 liter version, but bigger.

    The only thing it is missing is the avygear pouch.

    I'm using their 30 liter version myself for daytours. Seems to work fine and is light enough.
    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier
    You should post naked pictures of this godless heathen.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    20sickness
    Posts
    485
    Quote Originally Posted by couloirman View Post
    Same here. I love every cilogear pack I have. I have 2 20L leader packs, the 45L, and the 60. Great packs that are super lightweight and comfy as heck.
    Agreed on the cilogear. The 40 and 45L are full bodied to do a couple nights. Also made in the fkna USA. Osprey...not.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Breckenridge
    Posts
    572
    My Cilogear 45L will certainly carry a shit ton of gear, I recently used it to carry all the gear and food needed on the approach for 4 days in RMNP for skiing as well as a small rack and rope, crampons and ice axe.

    However, for that much weight the suspension SUCKS. My Cold Cold World Chaos(roughly 65L) handled so much better it was night and day, carried skis better and I liked the gear loops on the harness.

    The CCW Chaos does not compress down as well as the CiloGear 45L and the hipbelt is not removable like the CiloGear, but for the trip above the CCW beat the Cilogear hands down.

    Also CCW is made in USA AFAIK

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Wankouver
    Posts
    1,527
    I was shopping for something similar this year and went with the Osprey Variant 52. More of a mountaineering pack but works well for skiing.

    Haven't used it a whole lot yet so I can't give a definitive review but it does fit me way better than my old A'T bora 40.

    Sent from my GT-I9000M using TGR Forums

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    85
    Little smaller than you listed, other than that Seems to have everything your looking for and the price is right on it.

    REI Pinnacle 50 Pack
    http://www.rei.com/product/816103/rei-pinnacle-50-pack

    I second the Osprey Variant. I have the 37 L version. If your a good packer and go light it works as an over night pack.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NorCal
    Posts
    2,535
    AKBruin - I honestly think you just need to re-evaluate what you are carrying. That Khamiski is a 47L that even extends a bit up top to 50L. I have the Arcteryx Borea 50L (not not the Bora but the Borea). I have been able to use it on 7 day tours, 5 day tours, etc... For an overnight, there is boat-loads of room with cleaver packing.

    Nick

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,541
    Thanks, UCL. The truth is that I have indeed reevaluated what I'm carrying and have come to the following conclusions: (a) I can't afford to replace my existing gear with smaller, lighter gear (or, at least, it's easier for me to buy a new bag than new everything else); (b) I like to have have room to spare in my bag (i.e., I don't like precise, Tetris-style packing to the brim, which I suck at anyway); (c) I'm not all that confident that my current pack is in fact 47 (it seems smaller); and (d) I'm totally okay with having a big, heavy pack. Anyhow, I'd rather have a 63L bag with room to spare than a 47L bag stuffed to the gills and/or with crap dangling off it.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    85
    As much as people love to rave about packing so efficiently, the truth is when your dead tired and packing up camp, you pack like shit and nothing ever fits the way it did on the way in.

    UCL you could overnight in a 10L pack, just hang a bunch of crap on the outside.

    Get over being a weight pussy and do some more training.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    230
    I have the osprey variant 52L.
    an FYI - I am 6'1" and assumed I would be a Large.
    When they sized me at the shop I was squarely in a Medium which I was surprised about but after a solid year of it i can say it's fitting well.
    Btw I love the pack.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    4,055
    i have the first version of the aether 60, which is pretty different than the current model. mine has rods on the side that serve as the pack suspension. when i have very little in my pack, the gear compressed down, and i am skiing steep snow, the rods kinda poke me in the back of the head (i.e., my head is tilted back a bit). this is not something that i notice when checking out the pack in the store. for me, this may be an issue if i had a helmet. currently, it's more of an annoyance. i'm not sure if the "peripheral rods" in the current model would have the same issue.

    i was always under the impression that there was no standard in measuring pack volumes. I always perceived Arc'teryx packs as having larger in actual volume than the equivalent osprey pack.

    cheers

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,541
    UCL knows what he's talking about. Part of packing efficiently is experience--i.e., knowing what's needed and not, how much, and how to pack it. UCL does enough multi-day tours that I'm confident that he knows what he's doing.

    Anyhow, I tried the Aether 60 out at REI yesterday. Like JAREDS, I thought the medium fit better even though I usually go for large (6'). I was impressed by its various features, which are notably absent from my austere Arc'Teryx packs. In particular, the straps running down the front of the pack seem ideal for carrying skis. Indeed, they seem superior to the A-frame style in which the skis constantly hit the backs of my legs. I also got the impression that Osprey packs are less bombproof than Arc'Teryx. I'll probably pick one up before the REI sale ends but I still want to do a little more research.

    I don't know where I can find Cilo packs.
    Last edited by AKbruin; 04-03-2012 at 12:23 PM.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,247
    A little big is the mountain Hardwear South Col. I really like this pack and have subbed it into my summer weekend backpacking trips until i find an ideal 55l ultralight.

    The south col is 70L but has ice axe loops, and ski carry slots. Even has little clipper loops on belt for carry of screws, biners, etc.
    I demoed the TECH TALK JONG! pro model this spring and their performance was unparalleled which is good because I ski in a wedge most of the time - bendtheski, 2011

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Breckenridge
    Posts
    572
    I don't know of anywhere that stocks the cilogear packs. You can check them out and order directly at cilogear.com

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NorCal
    Posts
    2,535
    Quote Originally Posted by AKbruin View Post
    Thanks, UCL. The truth is that I have indeed reevaluated what I'm carrying and have come to the following conclusions: (a) I can't afford to replace my existing gear with smaller, lighter gear (or, at least, it's easier for me to buy a new bag than new everything else); (b) I like to have have room to spare in my bag (i.e., I don't like precise, Tetris-style packing to the brim, which I suck at anyway); (c) I'm not all that confident that my current pack is in fact 47 (it seems smaller); and (d) I'm totally okay with having a big, heavy pack. Anyhow, I'd rather have a 63L bag with room to spare than a 47L bag stuffed to the gills and/or with crap dangling off it.
    Fair engough AK. In particular, point (a) obviously impacts things a bit. One of the easiest ways to save pack space for overnights is the sleeping system you use.

    Reading some of the posts above, I would also second the Cliogear packs. Although pricey, they are bomber construction, measured accurately with size, carry great and actually don't weigh much. I have seen Harpo's bag and I can tell you it looks MUCH bigger than the literage suggests. Both Enginerd and I were pretty amazed that it was not actually a 60L pack. They definitely make awesome packs.

    One other one I would throw out - Wildthings. They recently re-did their entire line (and similar to Mystery Ranch, they have very big miltary contracts so do a lot of that work). All made in the USA. Anyway, the the Andinista is a very popular pack amoung alpinists for single-push big wall alpine climbing (think Rupal Face by House and stuff like that). The range on the pack is pretty impressive: Volume: 3000 c.i. (49 liters) fully compressed to 5500 c.i. (90 liters) expanded. 3 lbs 8 oz without the bivy pad. I have never used one of these, but heard good things about them. You pay a premium for Cliogear, but likely can shave a little weight off it.


    And to Kire2008 - I can't stand having stuff hanging outside the pack. In particular, worse is when others above a climb or skin track rock that setup - I am just looking up waiting for that crap to come flying down like missles. The only thing I typically rock on the outside is a rolled-up 3/4 blue foamie.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NorCal
    Posts
    2,535
    AK - here is a link to what I was talking about:

    http://www.wildthingsgear.com/catalo...5/?color=light grey
    W

    Would be curious how the similarly sized Cliogear packs weigh up. Although I think Cliogear is making some all-dynema pack which is crazy light (can't think how that affects suspension).

    If you don't care about actual empty pack weight and want bomber suspension, just get Mystery Ranch (e.g., new "Dana Designs"). They are amazing quality and will last a lifetime.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,080
    AKBruin - before you dive in and buy that Osprey pack, which is probably just fine, I got nothing against Osprey and they're warranteed forever, look into the Gregory Z55 and Z65.

    I have a Z55 which is my summer multi-night backpacking pack and winter overnighter. The Z65 is basically the same pack with a larger pack bag.

    I love the suspension and frame on these packs. It's very small and form-fitting but has excellent waist straps for carrying good loads. When the pack is near empty it compresses down very small, it's like carrying a day pack. Skis very well, no worse than my Switch 26 ski pack. The external pocket works great for shovel and probe. I thought these packs were more comfortable than the Osprey packs too.

    You could rig something up for a diagonal carry on these packs but I solve the leg-bang problem by simply making sure the skis are high enough up on the pack when A-framing that they won't hit my legs. Makes things interesting when climbing through trees/brush but it's not that often that I'm doing that.

    Anyway, good luck with your pack search!
    ...Some will fall in love with life and drink it from a fountain that is pouring like an avalanche coming down the mountain...

    "I enjoy skinny skiing, bullfights on acid..." - Lacy Underalls

    The problems we face will not be solved by the minds that created them.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •