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  1. #1
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    Support for Morton's Neuroma?

    Hello,

    Does anyone suffer from Morton's Neuroma? If so, how do you deal with it? Any suggestions on pads or supports?

    I suffer from it between my 3rd and 4th toe.
    Fighting leads to killing, and killing gets to warring. And that was damn near the death of us all.

  2. #2
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    I first came down with it about 10 years ago while in Whistler. Now I always wear shoes with really good support or orthotic footbeds. A metatarsal bump right in the middle of the forefoot of the orthotic seems to help.
    Some people recommended surgery, but I would put that off as long as possible.

  3. #3
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    Back when I snowboarded I got neuroma bad. everyday I would duck tape a donut hole'd pad to the top of my foot, It helped somewhat
    Quote Originally Posted by Hohes View Post
    I couldn't give a fuck, but today I am procrastinating so TGR is my filler.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by My Pet Powder Goat View Post
    Back when I snowboarded I got neuroma bad. everyday I would duck tape a donut hole'd pad to the top of my foot, It helped somewhat
    To the top of your foot? Interesting.

    I wondering if something like this would help -




    http://www.footsmart.com/P-FootSmart...-ea-40110.aspx
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Fighting leads to killing, and killing gets to warring. And that was damn near the death of us all.

  5. #5
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    ya, not sure if we're talking about the exact same neuroma, but I syptoms were similar and was due to nerves running along the top of my foot, causing pain between my toes. I put the donut over the bump on the top of my foot. sorry I cant be more specific now, trying to get to work. Ill look into it later
    Quote Originally Posted by Hohes View Post
    I couldn't give a fuck, but today I am procrastinating so TGR is my filler.
    Quote Originally Posted by skifishbum View Post
    faceshots are a powerful currency
    get paid

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    42
    I have struggled with it for 10+ years. While I can never get rid of it, I can reduce the pain by conditioning the foot.

    It may be counter - intuitive, but I run to manage the morton's neuroma.

    Get some shoes with good padding and are somewhat wider than usual. I like the Nike vomero.
    The idea is that the neuroma is caused because the bones are pinching the nerve, I want to create more space between the bones. So, I run and the pounding helps spread the foot. You need the padding to prevent further irritation of the swollen nerve, and the wide shoe to allow your foot to spread.

    I also have had success with the legs and back DVD from P90X. This is a workout with a lot of toe raises. Strengthening the foot seems to help as I don't consider surgery an option.

    Good luck.

    PS. I am not a foot expert, but I suspect snowboarding boots that are too narrow can contribute to the morton's neuroma pain.

  7. #7
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    May 2006
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    *** metatarsal pads - they help by spreading the "rays" of the foot. You can try it out yourself, all it is is a raised pad about 1/4" high that goes behind the ball of your foot. Google image metatarsal pad to see the shape/profile. Sometimes work, sometimes don't.
    ... jfost is really ignorant, he often just needs simple facts laid out for him...

  8. #8
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    I'm gonna give the metatarsal pad a try. Have you used them in ski boots?
    Fighting leads to killing, and killing gets to warring. And that was damn near the death of us all.

  9. #9
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    Jan 2008
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    Most important is room in your shoe or boot for your toes (and metatarsals) to spread out. I use met pads--they help but don't cure it. Arch supports--which I started using after I had plantar fasciitis seem to make the morton's pain worse. I do use a foot bed when I ski--and the neuroma bothers me if I tighten the lower buckles too much--I go back and forth, depending on conditions and how much pain I'm willing to tolerate. I haven't tried custom met orthotics. No surgery for me if I can help it (and I'm a surgeon). I have found that beating myself on the head with an ice axe helps with the foot pain; trekking poles are much less effective, and the relief is temporary (and see the thread on stacked concussions)

  10. #10
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    May 2002
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    I can't believe no one has suggested going to a reflexologist in this thread. If anyone has the most time working feet through their respective problems and, also curing a host of other bodily pains, it's reflexologists. As anyone would guess, I'm alternative therapy junkie when it comes to aches and pains. But I've found out what works and what doesn't, at least for myself. And reflexology has been awesome.

  11. #11
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    Feb 2006
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    I developed one on my left foot- metatarsal heads between my 3rd and 4th toes. Went to a pediatrist and got a custom made insole that has a foam bump/pad just back from my toes-the idea being that it helps distribute the weight of the foot and take pressure off the inflamed nerve area.

    I also ended up switching from skiing in regular alpine boots to a.t. boots full time to avoid the ramp angle that is commonly found in full-on alpine boots. I use superfeet insoles and they work well for me.

    With more of an upright stance position and less ramp angle I haven't had any problems. I only use the custom insole when I'm hiking/backpacking.

    Good Luck and avoid surgery if you can-I've heard it's brutal.

  12. #12
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    I thought I was suffering from one for almost three years and no matter what I tried it would not get better. Tried just about everything. Opted for surgery and turned out it was a benign cyst instead - surgeon could not tell until he got in there. Same symptoms, location, classic clicking and pain. Xrays could not show the difference because of the swelling. My surgeon is a foot and ankle specialist and is great. Don't let any ortho surgeon cut ya open but choose a good foot and ankle specialist - do your homework! Despite what has been said here the surgery is routine (according to my doc) and I was walking the next day. Back to full speed in 3 weeks with minor discomfort. Almost 3 months later, working out, lifting climbing, skiing and even running - all pain free. Good luck.
    The Passion is in the Risk

  13. #13
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    Sep 2006
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    After feeling the burning pain like someone had put a cigarette out on my toe for months,I had one shot of cortisone and it went away forever

    Hayduke Aug 7,1996 GS-Aug 26 2010
    HunterS March 17 09-Oct 24 14

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    28
    Anyone try Topricin for a Neuroma? I'm trying like hell to salvage a snowboarding trip to Colorado in February, but don't think I'll be able to ride unless I get this thing under control -- if that's even possible. Started with a steroid shot that worked for 7 months; then second one last month had no effect. Started holistic solutions to rehab foot & avoid some truly medieval, invasive options -- think alcohol shots to murder the nerve, or freezing, burning or amputating the nerve. No thanks.
    Remedies explored so far:
    1. Icing the foot down every night;
    2. Use toe spreader in the evening;
    3. Metatarsal pads & custom Orthotics in the running shoes;
    4. Threw out all shoes with narrow toe box;
    5. Had custom orthotics made by Claude at Skinet Sports for the snowboard boots. Strapped into the bindings/board with the new orthotics and didn't feel pain when putting pressure on the toes, but test driving the equipment in the shop isn't the the same, obviously, as on the mountain. Rode last year before receiving diagnosis for the foot -- super stupid. The pain when coming around on that toe-side turn was excruciating. Like being kicked in the gut. Curiously, there is no pain when walking -- just running and snowboarding. The two things most of us on this forum are extremely reluctant to give up.

    So to recap, the Topricin is a new tool in the arsenal and was wondering if anyone's had a good outcome with it in regards to snowboarding/skiing?

    Thx

  15. #15
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    What do you have to loose?

    Mine was from some race boots that didn't fit properly. I got bigger boots and did all the stuff in post #2 and it went away.

    I did just get a new pair of downsized boots, fitted by a much more competent tech. Hopefully it doesn't come back.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by nyboarder View Post
    Started holistic solutions to rehab foot & avoid some truly medieval, invasive options -- think alcohol shots to murder the nerve, or freezing, burning or amputating the nerve. No thanks.
    I hate to be the bearer of bad news nyboarder, but nerve damage bad enough to cause pain as severe as you describe is probably irreversible. Once the nerve becomes sufficiently scarified there is no going back. You can do your best to keep the pain tolerable and keep it from getting worse, but shoes and pads probably won't make it better.

    Signed,

    21-month post-op Morton's Neuroma resection patient

    p.s. FWIW, my surgeon's opinion was that the alcohol injections and cryotherapy are ineffective and largely worthless.

    Quote Originally Posted by Shredhead View Post
    What do you have to loose?
    Money, since it is a homeopathic treatment and homeopathy is a scam. Besides being homeopathic, the website looks very scammy in general.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    I hate to be the bearer of bad news nyboarder, but nerve damage bad enough to cause pain as severe as you describe is probably irreversible. Once the nerve becomes sufficiently scarified there is no going back. You can do your best to keep the pain tolerable and keep it from getting worse, but shoes and pads probably won't make it better.

    Signed,

    21-month post-op Morton's Neuroma resection patient

    p.s. FWIW, my surgeon's opinion was that the alcohol injections and cryotherapy are ineffective and largely worthless.



    Money, since it is a homeopathic treatment and homeopathy is a scam. Besides being homeopathic, the website looks very scammy in general.
    Like the man says. I've had mine for close to forty years. At this point met pads, wide shoes, etc help a little but nothing short of surgery is going to cure it. Except that now that I have lumbar stenosis and the 3rd 4th and 5th toes of both feet have gone numb the neuroma bothers me a lot less. I'd prefer the neuroma.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    28
    An update to my post above of nearly a year ago. Shortly after I posted the above a nurse friend suggested I try Tumeric for it's anti-inflammatory properties. I was a little skeptical, but willing to try anything to avoid surgery or more steroid foot shots -- not to mention the three months I spent in physical therapy which turned out to be totally ineffective.

    It was suggested that I use the tumeric in a tea or milk, but I just went to Sprouts and found it in pill form. Relieved the symptoms 100%. I've returned to running, snowboarding and busted out the high heels again. Had a great time at Keystone in Feb., -- a trip I was considering cancelling because of the foot page.

    Just wanted to share that if you've got a neuroma, Tumeric is an effective alternative to the more invasive, expensive and sometimes crippling options out there.

  19. #19
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    Oct 2003
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    As mentioned the met pad but also a good footbed. The Sole footbeds are good and if too much support you can heat them and take some support out. The combo of the two should open up some space PLUS help control the movement that formed it in the first place.
    It's not so much the model year, it's the high mileage or meterage to keep the youth of Canada happy

  20. #20
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    Aug 2018
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    2

    Morton's Neuroma

    I could not stand more than 3-5 hours at work due to severe pain in both feet as result of Morton's Neuroma. After receiving proper treatments and wearing the orthofeet shoes I can happily say that I am able to stand for 12 hours at work and be pain free in both my feet. They feel great and I love the colors. Have helped my feet pain tremendously.

  21. #21
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    Pretty coherent post for a bot, laughably terrible spam effort if human.

  22. #22
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    Nov 2018
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    10
    Have it in my left foot. Tried all the varieties of super feet but have settled on Powerstep Pinnacle Maxx as preferred insoles.

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