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  1. #351
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    Feb 2011
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    Saw the Nova special on the Mars rover last night. Mind blowing the tech they packed into this thing.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  2. #352
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    Nov 2017
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    I could see in their faces how proud they are. Damn!

  3. #353
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    Apr 2021
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    nice

  4. #354
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    MSL MCAM 360...can pan in youtube:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IX6LEAqUx-E

  5. #355
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    Quote Originally Posted by 406 View Post
    MSL MCAM 360...can pan in youtube:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IX6LEAqUx-E
    Oh cool. Going to look this up in my oculus.

  6. #356
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    from last month, I was on vacation, so forgot to post:

  7. #357
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    It's worth checking out the link to see how they plan on ripping off part of the old rover's wheels to keep it running. Seems like a cool project to work on.
    But while the new kids on the block are getting all the attention, spare a thought for the reliable old warhorse which has been plying Gale Crater for the better part of a decade now — Curiosity. NASA has been driving the compact-car-sized rover around Mars for a long time now, long enough to rack up some pretty severe damage to its six highly engineered wheels, thanks to the brutal Martian rocks. But if you think Curiosity will get sidelined as its wheels degrade, think again — the rover’s operators have a plan to continue surface operations that includes ripping off its own wheels if necessary. It’s a complex operation that would require positioning the wheel over a suitable rock and twisting with the steering motor to peel off the outer section of the wheel, leaving a rim to drive around on. JPL has already practiced it, but they predict it won’t be necessary until 2034 or so. Now that’s thinking ahead.
    https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/...to-stay-mobile

  8. #358
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    I don't have much to do with the heli and they used cots cameras, but cool to see the images from flight. They are all on the public page now, so if you are interested:
    https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/multi...RTE#raw-images

    Ones I liked:







  9. #359
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    Kind of crazy the helicopter is still going and how routine it has become.

    In other news, few weeks ago our camera on JUNO captured some awesome photos of Ganymede. I'm a huge fan of the Galilean moons and started this science payload operations "career" involved in the imaging during the final Galileo spacecraft flyby of Ganymede...~20 years ago, the last time imaged at a good resolution.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Björn Jónsson

    Cool video of the flyby made with images from JUNO Cam:

  10. #360
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    ^awesome and worth the watch! What a wild timelapse with Juno's crazy orbit!

    That we are regularly operating a rotorcraft on another planet is mindblowing.

    I really wish they had done the Jupiter Icy Moon Orbiter it would have been a breakthrough in so many regards.

    Still ESA JUICE will launch next year and NASA Europa Clipper will launch in 2024

    Also three cheers for getting Hubble Fixed
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  11. #361
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    Still ESA JUICE will launch next year and NASA Europa Clipper will launch in 2024
    Is there anything in the solar system more compelling than Europa and Enceladus? Not in my mind. Even Titan is a far behind either. Or maybe deep groundwater on Mars, but drilling thousands of feet below the Martian surface is a long, long ways off.

  12. #362
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Is there anything in the solar system more compelling than Europa and Enceladus? Not in my mind. Even Titan is a far behind either. Or maybe deep groundwater on Mars, but drilling thousands of feet below the Martian surface is a long, long ways off.
    I'd actually argue Calisto and Ganymede might be more interesting than much smaller Europa and tiny little Enceladus for seeking life-as-we-know-it...

    Titan must be explored further because it is the best candidate for life-as-we-don't-know-it. UAV and robosub missions will be next-level-cool, and far less of an engineering feat than nuclear icemelt drilling missions to drop a tethered ROV sub into the subsurface oceans of the icy moons.

    Ganymede, Titan, and Calisto are the 3 most massive bodies in the solar system after the 8 major planets.

    I am curious about shallow water deposits on Mars as evidenced by recent MRO images, but the perchlorate problem in Martian soil is discouraging for life-as-we-know-it.
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  13. #363
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    My understanding with Ganymede and Callisto is that, unlike Europa and Enceladus, their subsurface oceans are separated from the rocky core by another layer of ice (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Callis...to_diagram.svg ; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ganyme...de_diagram.svg). Without rock in contact with water life seems a lot less likely. There's also strong evidence for active hydrothermal vents on Europa and Enceladus.

    UAV and robosub missions on Titan must happen and will be rad as hell. But, I do wonder whether the chemistry of even ultra-exotic life can proceed in liquid methane at -290* F. Titan has a subsurface liquid water ocean, but like Ganymede and Callisto it's sandwiched between ice layers and not in contact with the mineral core (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titan_...tan_poster.svg).

    I'm not talking about shallow groundwater on Mars that creates the RSLs we can see in MRO images. I'm talking about deep groundwater, thousands of feet down. Hot wet rock 10,000 feet down in old South African gold mines is teeming with life (https://www.cbsnews.com/news/looking...es-2020-02-09/). If life evolved on Mars it may have colonized similar deep geological zones and wouldn't have given a single shit that the surface oceans evaporated billions of years ago.

  14. #364
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    ^all great points
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

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