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  1. #1
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    sidewall planers....any good ones?

    there seem to be a ton of them out there, what works?

    (I read the skitune101 blog posted here and the reviews weren't too complementary on some models)
    cheers,
    P
    "Dad, I can huck that"

  2. #2
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    hows about a pansar file?

  3. #3
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    and freehand? thought about that, but I would be worried about my dumb ass slipping and damaging my edges.
    "Dad, I can huck that"

  4. #4
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    Talk to Doc at racewax.com... He will tell you what you need and dont need!! he will also give you a discount on what ever you buy!

  5. #5
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    at the shop I used to work at we had the swix economy sidewall cutter and it worked well.

    freehand really isn't too tough though

  6. #6
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    Here is our page on planers and side wall cutting approaches.

    It's not rocket science, but a planer is definitely nicer over time. Some will tape a coin on a dedicated guide to increase the angle while using a panzer or other coarse file. Free handing is an option, but it's hard to control consistency.
    Best regards, Terry
    (Direct Contact is best vs PMs)

    SlideWright.com
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    Repair, Waxing, Tuning, Mounting Tips & more

  7. #7
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    I've tried them all & the FK/SKS Pro sidewall trimmer is the best on the market for both function & value for money. I've sold hundreds of them & done over a 1000 pairs of skis with my own & it's still perfect.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spyderjon View Post
    I've tried them all & the FK/SKS Pro sidewall trimmer is the best on the market for both function & value for money. I've sold hundreds of them & done over a 1000 pairs of skis with my own & it's still perfect.
    Any comments - 4 years later?

    This looks similar to the Briko/Maplus planer that Terry (Slidewright) sells (http://www.slidewright.com/briko-map...minum-body.php).

    Actually, the Briko/Maplus looks superior in that height adjustment appears to be accomplished at both sides, and there appear to be 3 roller guides. Both have aluminum bodies. The only other worthwhile tool I can find is the one from SVST - albeit at a fairly stiff price, but clearly a simple, beautiful piece of engineering.

    I have to say, that with respect to tools, I've never found "economy" tools to be any sort of a bargain. I'm a fan of buying it once and done. The Swix economy planer my friend gave me may well be the single worst tool in any category that I've ever had the privilege of using.

    [Edit: May 28th] I've upgraded it to "ok" after receiving delivery of an SVST World Cup planer. Clearly, the SVST is a superior tool, but most of the problems I had working around the wide points of the ski have to do with tip and tail vibration as much the tool itself. In post #26 below on this date, I comment on how you can control the depth of the cut "in-flight" which helps mitigate some of this problem.



    Thanks,
    Thom
    Last edited by galibier_numero_un; 05-28-2015 at 03:38 PM.
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  9. #9
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    That's interesting... swix economy works just fine for me

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muggydude View Post
    That's interesting... swix economy works just fine for me
    Could be a learning curve, but I found it extremely difficult to (a) set the height adjustment - so you're cutting sidewall as close to the edge as possible and (b) fine tune the depth of the cut. Other than that, it's a precision tool. I used a scrap piece of MDF I had lying around - to get a sense of how it cuts, and how to set the height and depth of cut.

    One thing that became clear (and I realize will be the case with even more precision tools) is that you can't get too close to the shovel or a curved tail, because it will throw the depth setting out and you'll be taking big chunks out of the sidewall. Fortunately, I stopped in time and cleaned the error up with a panzer file.

    Cheers,
    Thom
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  11. #11
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    [Edit: After studying the photos, below]

    It appears as if the cylindrical part of the blade holder rides on the side of the edge, so that this, in conjunction with adjusting the blade angle controls the cutting depth. This might require the slightest bit of dexterity to keep from rotating the tool (control the cutter angle), but anyone with the basic dexterity to tune skis should have no problem.

    I like the essential simplicity and directness of this tool, and it appears to be the easiest of all of them to eyeball your setting in order to cut right to the point where the sidewall meets the edge.






    Thanks,
    Thom
    Last edited by galibier_numero_un; 08-19-2015 at 03:19 PM.
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  12. #12
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    I'm still using my FK/SKS/Kunzmann Pro Sidewall trimmer as pictured above & it's done in excess of 2000 pairs of skis/boards etc. I replaced the flat blade last season.

  13. #13
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    That's a pretty strong endorsement. Thanks! It's nice to have a few good choices, and it seems to boil down to a coin toss between the two (SVST & FKS/Kunzman). 2,000 sidewall sets ... that ought to hold me ;-)

    Is that gray pad on the opposite end of the height adjuster screw made of Delrin or some other tough plastic? Anodized aluminum?



    ... Thom
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  14. #14
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    If you have ptex sidewalls, you can just use a razor blade. No really.
    No longer stuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    Just an uneducated guess.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by galibier_numero_un View Post
    ........Is that gray pad on the opposite end of the height adjuster screw made of Delrin or some other tough plastic....
    Yep, it's a super tough plastic however, as with any sidewall trimmer that runs on the side edge angle, you should always deburr the side edge first with an au-oxide stone before using the sidewall trimmer.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spyderjon View Post
    Yep, it's a super tough plastic however, as with any sidewall trimmer that runs on the side edge angle, you should always deburr the side edge first with an au-oxide stone before using the sidewall trimmer.
    Thanks! Makes perfect sense with any of these tools.

    Cheers,
    Thom
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  17. #17
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    this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
    Here is our page on planers and side wall cutting approaches.

    It's not rocket science, but a planer is definitely nicer over time. Some will tape a coin on a dedicated guide to increase the angle while using a panzer or other coarse file. Free handing is an option, but it's hard to control consistency.

  18. #18
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    I have the SVST one. It gets used a ton and after 5 years is still going strong. Only issue is that it took a little while to get the angle and depth dialed in, but once its set its bomb proof
    My Portfolio
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
    I have the SVST one. It gets used a ton and after 5 years is still going strong. Only issue is that it took a little while to get the angle and depth dialed in, but once its set its bomb proof
    Thanks, Gunder. Perhaps the only question I have about it, relates to how solid the threads holding the set screw are (the threads in the trapezoidal part that allows you to set the cutting height and depth). It sounds as if after 5 years of heavy use, that this is a non-issue. I suspected as much.

    I'm leaning toward the SVST, but I know I can't go wrong with the FKS either. Yet another 1st world dilemna ;-)

    Thanks,
    Thom
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  20. #20
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    Thom, The set screw is solid. As with everything that SVST makes, the sidewall planer is bomber.
    My Portfolio
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  21. #21
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    The FK/SKS/Kunzmann Pro Sidewall trimmer is waaaaay faster to adjust than the SVST one & costs less as well.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spyderjon View Post
    The FK/SKS/Kunzmann Pro Sidewall trimmer is waaaaay faster to adjust than the SVST one & costs less as well.
    Thanks everyone for your feedback. Clearly, these two products are head and shoulders above the pack. Based on your feedback as well as some observations (obviously not having used the tools), here's my geeked out summary:

    SVST:

    • Bomber construction
    • Simplicity - three main parts all aluminum or stainless
    • Made in USA (yes!) - might be able to get parts more easily 5 years from now.
    • Cutting blade position is visible, although setting height and depth might take some time when compared with FKS/Kunzman. Looking at the photos, the working parts on both tools appear to be clearly visible and easy to adjust. I don't see an advantage of one over the other in this regard, but I may be wrong.
    • Might require a bit more of a "touch" due the cutter head mounting cylinder being the single point of contact with the edge
    • Using "touch" and familiarity with the tool, cutting angle can be controlled manually by rotating tool slightly. Depending on your dexterity, this direct control can be an advantage or a disadvantage. I personally like this.
    • Likely easier to navigate around curves (tip and tail) due to single point of contact with ski edge for cutting depth control.


    FKS/Kunzman:

    • Bomber construction
    • More parts than SVST, but they all appear to be well made, using durable materials based on field reports
    • Made in Germany (nice), but only one distribution source in the US (parts availability 5 years from now?)
    • Cutter blade depth easily adjustable, independently of cutter height.
    • Cutter height adjusted by screw stop, combined with fixed Delrin(?) pad at other end of tool
    • Controlling height of cut (to adjust contact point where sidewall meets ski edge) likely requires less manual control than SVST over the main section of ski, due to two points of contact with ski edge (screw + Delrin pad)
    • Controlling height of cut is likely more difficult to navigate around curves in tip and tail than SVST. I may be wrong about this, but with brief experience with the Swix economy cutter, this seems to be a liability of this two-point geometry (rather than the abominable execution of the Swix).


    So, the key distinguishing point would appear to be the single vs. dual point of contact and the inherent advantages/disadvantages of each one as far as cutting height control is concerned (cutting at the junction of the edge and the sidewall). I don't really think navigating around the curves at the tip of the ski is that important, but at the same time, why should you have to break out a panzer file for this area if you paid $$$ for a tool?

    Normally, the SVST is at a significant price disadvantage, but at this time of year, they're too close for this to be a determining factor. I think you can tell that I sold myself on the SVST, but both tools are winners

    [Edit] I ordered the SVST through Race-werks - $107.95 delivered price (vs. $99.95 plus possible shipping for the FKS). I try to give all of my business to Terry at Slidewright 'coz he's such a standup guy, but he no longer carries this tool.


    Thanks all!
    Thom
    Last edited by galibier_numero_un; 05-25-2015 at 07:35 PM.
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  23. #23
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    The other thing nice about the SVST planer is the multi-radi blade for different sidewall shapes and conditions:

    Best regards, Terry
    (Direct Contact is best vs PMs)

    SlideWright.com
    Ski, Snowboard & Bike Tools, Wax and Wares
    Repair, Waxing, Tuning, Mounting Tips & more

  24. #24
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    I really wanted to order from you Terry. I guess the high price for this tool reduces the demand, such that it's impossible to carry in inventory.

    Cheers,
    Thom
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  25. #25
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    Yeah, there's not much margin for us. It's available to order via our backorder/special order system system, however.

    Thanks, T
    Best regards, Terry
    (Direct Contact is best vs PMs)

    SlideWright.com
    Ski, Snowboard & Bike Tools, Wax and Wares
    Repair, Waxing, Tuning, Mounting Tips & more

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