Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1

    Working in the ski/snowboard industry

    Figured this would be a good place to start. I'm about to graduate in May with a degree in marketing and international business. I went to Colorado state for a couple years then traded the snow for the surf and came to finish college in Myrtle beach. I have been trying to get back to the mountains ever since. I'm looking for any type of internship or entry level job in this industry. Does anyone have any suggestions on who to contact or how to go about doing this? Thanks for the help.

    - Rob

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Hood
    Posts
    1,076
    My advice would be to take that fancy degree get a good high paying job in Salt lake or Denver and keep skiing as a hobby. Retire early and ski everyday. Frankly there is no money in the industry and we all eventually find ourselves skiing less once we have worked in the industry for a while. We work every holiday.

    Now, if you still want to get into the industry understand that it is all about earning your stripes, I started at 15 putting boots on peoples feet in the rental shop. 10 years later I finally have make a livable wage and a year round job with benefits. Most of my Co-workers started in hourly seasonal jobs and showed that they were far better than there burnt-out liftie counterparts and eventually moved into better positions. It takes lots of sacrifice and work to prove to "the man" that you are worth keeping around. My experience is mostly on the resort side of things, Im not really qualified to give advice on the supplier end. Except to say that it you are not the only business major with a dream of being in the industry so you have do something or know someone to set yourself apart.
    I don't mean to sound like a downer. I like my job, and the people in the industry are down to earth and great to deal with for the most part. But, Most of us followed our passion into the industry and at some point realized that it really is just a job.
    /end preaching.
    www.skithebeav.com
    You can pick your nose and you can pick your friends. You cant pick your friends nose.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Motown
    Posts
    542
    ^^^Wise words from the Duker up there^^^

    And just to reiterate: THERE IS NO MONEY IN THE INDUSTRY

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    People's Republic of MN
    Posts
    5,184
    Many have tried, most have failed. Have a good day job, or prepare to be too broke to ski when you become an "industry insider".
    Gravity. It's the law.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Vancouver BC
    Posts
    2,656
    Become a dentist if you want to ski a lot. Seriously.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,104
    If you want to make money and take time off chasing storms go to Boston, New York or LA (plus some others) if you want a marketing job. You will get a paid a shit-ton more, which will give you the opportunity to take trips when you want. The ad/marketing industry is fickle and there is NO money in the ski industry. if you're happy with that, do what you want but I wouldn't suggest it. Priorities change, like mine did, and quite frankly I am happier making bank and getting 20 good days in rather than living check to check getting 70 days in with 20 of which are good days.

    my $.02

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Letting freedom ring from the mighty Alleghenies to the Colorado Rockies!
    Posts
    7
    I don't really understand the "there is no money in the ski industry" line of thinking.

    Take a look around, people who ski are well moneyed. People that ski 5-15 times a year at major resorts are typically very well off. Everything in the sport is expensive. The amount of money tied up in properties in ski towns is astronomical. Sorry, but if you think there isn't money in this industry, it is only because you aren't looking in the right place.

    People do make money in the ski industry, some make a lot. The trick is knowing how to get the money out of other peoples pockets and into yours, and that isn't usually accomplished by fitting boots or working seasonal jobs.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,104
    Quote Originally Posted by jeidgi View Post
    I don't really understand the "there is no money in the ski industry" line of thinking.

    Take a look around, people who ski are well moneyed. People that ski 5-15 times a year at major resorts are typically very well off. Everything in the sport is expensive. The amount of money tied up in properties in ski towns is astronomical. Sorry, but if you think there isn't money in this industry, it is only because you aren't looking in the right place.

    People do make money in the ski industry, some make a lot. The trick is knowing how to get the money out of other peoples pockets and into yours, and that isn't usually accomplished by fitting boots or working seasonal jobs.
    99.9% of people who work "in the industry" are not rich. And of those .1% who are, they are successful CEOs of resorts and companies. Your average marketing lackey is making shit for money.

    Yes there is money in "the industry" but not where this person is looking or anyone who would be asking this question for the matter. To make money in "this industry" you either have to have money or be extremely lucky. And unless you are rich and extremely lucky, you aren't getting rich living in a skitown.

    There is no doubt that working in the marketing industry in a non-ski town would make at least double if not more money. It's just common sense.

    And, there's the rub... If you have no problem making money and want to ski 100+ days, go ahead. If you want to amass wealth, retire early and make money for your future, for the most people, a ski town is not the place to be.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Down In A Hole, Up in the Sky
    Posts
    24,163
    Quote Originally Posted by jeidgi View Post
    I don't really understand the "there is no money in the ski industry" line of thinking.

    Take a look around, people who ski are well moneyed. People that ski 5-15 times a year at major resorts are typically very well off. Everything in the sport is expensive. The amount of money tied up in properties in ski towns is astronomical. Sorry, but if you think there isn't money in this industry, it is only because you aren't looking in the right place.

    .
    I think you are confusing the real estate and lodging industries with the 'ski industry' part of the equation.
    StokePimpin' ain't easy

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Letting freedom ring from the mighty Alleghenies to the Colorado Rockies!
    Posts
    7
    There is rarely good money in doing somebody else's bidding... I don't care where you are or what you do. If the fella up the board wants to be in a ski town or part of the industry, I'd say go for it. I say get some experience working for somebody and then get your own thing together. If it's marketing we are talking about, you don't need a ton of money to get started.

    It's less about luck and more about being smart and working hard. Being a dentist is a damn good idea though.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Morrison, CO
    Posts
    463
    I, like a lot of other people, started working in shops at 15-16. Graduated highschool, went to Snowbird. While working the rental counter at Snowbird, I watched a family of five rent gear for the week, plus the requisite turtlenecks, gloves, goggles, cat crap, double black diamond pin, etc etc etc.

    Their total at the store was WELL over what I made in a month. Probably double. Started adding it up - $1200 (or so) at the rental shop. 5 plane tickets. 6 nights lodging. Canyon Transportation. Food. etc. holy crap.

    At that point, I realized that I wanted a job that let me afford skiing, not one that afforded me skiing.

    I bummed for a bit more, skied a lot, skied tons and tons of powder, eventually went to college and got that job that let me afford skiing.

    10 years of Real Jobs, I decided to get back into the industry. I figured there'd be a happy medium on the corporate side - I knew I'd not get rich working in the industry, but I missed it; I missed the people, the happy vibe when it started to snow, etc. I figured I could find something that paid the bills - cake and eat it, all that.

    I've been back in the game for a few seasons now, and, well, THERE'S NO MONEY IN THE SKI INDUSTRY.

    For most of us, anyway.

    Knowing what I know now:

    1. If you want to make money - reasonable money - like buy a house and put your kid through college money - start young, work your ass off and play The Game. I work for a midsize retailer ($50M/yr in sales), and there are a handful of people making a reasonable living ($80k+/yr). A handful. Those people have all been with the company for 15+ years, they're smart, they work hard, and they put the time in 20 years ago to be in a good spot now. They don't ski much anymore, for the most part.

    2. At this point, I wish I'd gone to college first (sounds like the OP did), THEN bummed. Oh well. I also wish I'd gotten my crap together and figured out A Profession. In the ski industry, time pays dividends - 20 years at a real company, you might make $80k. (that's a pretty substantial check out of the stupid ski industry). 20 years at a Real Job, you'll be making a lot more than that. Or, you can, if that's what you're after. Money is certainly not everything, but it certainly helps.

    3. Skiing gets more fun as you get "old." Or, it does not get less fun, however you want to look at it. Not like you're only able to "rip" at 18-25 - sure, that's when most do it, but whatever, I'm having as much fun skiing now as I did when I was 19. I don't go "as big" or ski as fast, but whatever, I'm still having lots of fun.

    4. You're "old" a WHOLE LOT LONGER than "young." 25-18=7 years. 55-25=30 years.

    5. Don't do it. Like others have said, it is "a job." Selling widgets or beer or skis or ad space or or or, at some point, the _work_ is what's rewarding.

    6. Do it. The ski industry is full of awesome people who get it.

    IMHO, it really does boil down to money. How much can you live without? I've had both - all three, really - bum, Real Job (I've both worked and stayed at the Cliff Lodge, seen both sides of that, one night as a customer is one week's pay for a bellhop), and now corporate-ski-industry gig.

    Right now, if I buy new gear every year, I'll save $2-3k annually vs a customer, thanks to deals and proforms. I get a season pass. I get some flexibility in scheduling.

    So, call it $3500 in "perks." Maybe a free Rossi shirt here and a pair of skis there. Whatever.

    I'm giving up, what, $15k in income? $20k?

    My resume is well out and about, sadly. I'm going to miss it, but I'd much rather afford skiing than have it afforded to me.



    Iain

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    9,483
    NRO in brek needs a marketing intern for the summer. Good chance to hang in brek for the summer then make some winter connections. I do not know much about the NRO org, but I played in the Aspen music Festival, so NRO sends me all their propaganda.

    http://nromusic.com/index.cfm?PID=1303&ID=5174,19008,0
    Terje was right.

    "We're all kooks to somebody else." -Shelby Menzel

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    People's Republic of MN
    Posts
    5,184
    Quote Originally Posted by jeidgi View Post
    If it's marketing we are talking about, you don't need a ton of money to get started.
    Go to any "ski town" and take a look inside any doorway. Tell me how many marketing rags you see there. Seems pretty saturated if you ask me. It's akin to "being late to the party".

    For the average Joe, "the industry" offers very little financial security. Jobs with real benefits are hard to find since so many are willing to work less than full-time, just for the fringe benny of a pass.
    Gravity. It's the law.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Where everything's a dollar
    Posts
    2,403
    Quote Originally Posted by rgshield View Post
    Figured this would be a good place to start. I'm about to graduate in May with a degree in marketing and international business. I went to Colorado state for a couple years then traded the snow for the surf and came to finish college in Myrtle beach. I have been trying to get back to the mountains ever since. I'm looking for any type of internship or entry level job in this industry. Does anyone have any suggestions on who to contact or how to go about doing this? Thanks for the help.

    - Rob
    You don't need to work in the ski industry to be "in the mountains". There are plenty of ways to make a living in the mountains that are not part of the ski industry. Real estate, medical, food service, hospitality, construction, property maintenance, retail...the list goes on and on. Put that expensive education you have to work and figure something out. If you want it badly enough, you'll come up with something.
    Geronimo Motherfucker

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Orangina
    Posts
    7,020
    This thread is the funny.

    As someone with a real job in the "industry," I can't imagine doing it any other way. Yeah, you can live in LA, NY, wherever and roll in the dough and fly out to ski. But I love going to work. I party with the people I work with and work with the people I party with. I am proud of working for a company that makes products that allow people to have fun and get something positive out of life. You wanna be a baller? Don't do it. I'm not rich by any means but I make a good living, live where Ronald McCocksmoke pays $5K a week to visit and still suck at skiing, and I wake up stoked on every day. I'm willing to pay that opportunity cost.

    OP--send me a PM.
    "All God does is watch us and kill us when we get boring. We must never, ever be boring."

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •