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  1. #26
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    Feb 2008
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    My doctor just let me go back to the gym but I can't do any leg stuff yet. I now have a canakle and don't think I could even begin to get my foot in my ski boot. I am wondering how long the swelling is going to last. My doc is still trying to figure my rat posion dose out so I have had about 7 INR tests done in 2 weeks. It also looks like I got the DVT on a 4 hour flight from Anchorage to Portland and did not know I had it for about two weeks. I always thought you had to be on a long overseas flight to get these. Live and learn

  2. #27
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    Yeah, my INRs have been all over the place. It took me over a month to get over 2.0 (thus the 35 days of Lovenox shots). And I'm still all over the place. I've gone from 1.4 to 3.2 in the space of a week or so.

    Weird that you'd get it on only a four-hour flight. I think I got mine from the impact of my bike crash in Whistler combined with the 24-hour drive back to Tahoe. I'd certainly done my fair share of 10+ flights and long drives (e.g., SF to Anchorage and back) before without any problems. Good luck with it.

    Anyhow, today the nurse indicated that my doctor wants to get me off the coumadin soon. I have an ultrasound next week, which I assume will be to ensure that the clot is no more. If that fucker is gone, I hope to be aggresively engaging in blood sports by the end of the month. Razor fight anyone?

  3. #28
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    Dec 2006
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    Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press

    Serena Williams' absence from tennis could stretch to almost a year after two new health scares -- a blood clot in her lungs followed by a hematoma -- have added to her injury woes.

    Her agents confirmed Wednesday that Williams was diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism last week and later needed treatment for a hematoma. The 13-time Grand Slam champion hasn't played an official match since winning Wimbledon last July because of a foot injury she sustained not on the court but at a restaurant.

    Her latest health problems have been "extremely hard, scary and disappointing," Williams said in a statement. "I am doing better. I'm at home now and working with my doctors to keep everything under control. I know I will be OK but am praying and hoping this will all be behind me soon.

    "While I can't make any promises now on my return, I hope to be back by early summer. That said, my main goal is to make sure I get there safely," she said.

    People magazine first reported on Williams' condition, quoting spokeswoman Nicole Chabot as saying Williams underwent "emergency treatment" Monday for a hematoma suffered as a result of treatment for "a more critical situation," the pulmonary embolism.

    The 29-year-old Williams was treated at a Los Angeles hospital and then returned to her home in the city.

    "Thankfully everything was caught in time," her agents said in a statement. "With continued doctor visits to monitor her situation, she is recuperating at home under strict medical supervision."

    Williams' mother, Oracene Price, tweeted: "Thank you for your concern. She is fine."

    The tennis star attended Sunday night's Elton John AIDS Foundation Academy Awards Viewing Party. On Tuesday night, Williams posted on her Twitter account, "Tough day." A few minutes later, she retweeted Kim Kardashian.

    The younger sister of seven-time major champion Venus Williams has been out of competition since she cut her right foot on broken glass at a restaurant shortly after winning her fourth Wimbledon title July 3. Her comeback has been repeatedly delayed by complications with the injury.

    Williams had surgery after initially hurting her foot and pulled out of the U.S. Open. She resumed practicing in September but kept pushing back her return and needed an additional operation in October.

    Williams missed the Australian Open in January, where she was the two-time defending champion.

    Chabot told the magazine the embolism was discovered after Williams returned to Los Angeles from New York "for doctor appointments for the ongoing issues with her foot."

    Dr. Mark Adelman, chief of vascular surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center, said a patient with a pulmonary embolism would need to take an anticoagulant for six to 12 months but could play sports on the medication.

    "A blood clot can occur in any vein or extremity, most commonly in the leg, and can travel to the lung," Dr. Adelman wrote in an e-mail. "Prior surgery, air travel, prolonged sitting, birth control pills, obesity and pregnancy can predispose a patient to a blood clot in the leg that can travel to the lung."

    Adelman said if a clot-dissolving agent is used to treat an embolism, it can result in bleeding around the catheter used to deliver the drug. Williams' agents said the hematoma was removed.

    Williams has a wide range of business, fashion and charitable interests that keep her in the public eye even when she's not on the court. Since winning her first Grand Slam title in 1999, she has struggled with injuries on several occasions only to come back to win more championships.
    Doctor's take on Serena's condition here: http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=617...goryid=2378529

    Interesting. I like Serena Williams and can somewhat sympathize with a small, freakish accident leading to bigger and scarier issues. The doctor's comments on the video are a little scary.
    Last edited by AKbruin; 03-02-2011 at 04:58 PM.

  4. #29
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    Oct 2008
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    Dear Users of Lovenox, the slower you push it, the less it hurts, and the smaller you bruise!

  5. #30
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    Mar 2011
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    I am a 65 year old tournament water skier and snow skier, {http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfV8ucAIFhk}. I was still competing, until they put me on Lovenox, temporarily (3-6 months) for a recently diagnosed partial thrombosis in a vein in my liver. The hematologist and hepatoligist told me not to ski, water or snow, and I took that on face value and decided to follow their instructions. I've had several season ending surguries and injuries in both sports, but have always been glad none were career-ending. After reading the comments in this forum, I'm reconsidering the doctors' proscriptions. I ski to live and live to ski, it's my 'fountain of youth." There are another 6 weeks of snow ski season and the whole summer for water skiing. I believe I am competent to get on the "board(s)" and "ski lite" this year. So, should I take this year off, being the wise old 65 year old that I should be, or follow the advice I've read here, which is:
    "Limit risk, don't let risk limit you..."
    "I am apalled at how much folks are increasingly willing to trade in safety for freedom,"
    "No Eternal Reward will forgive us now for wasting the dawn..." Jim Morrison

    Any advice for me, please?




  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ski4Life! View Post
    I am a 65 year old tournament water skier and snow skier, {http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfV8ucAIFhk}. I was still competing, until they put me on Lovenox, temporarily (3-6 months) for a recently diagnosed partial thrombosis in a vein in my liver. The hematologist and hepatoligist told me not to ski, water or snow, and I took that on face value and decided to follow their instructions. I've had several season ending surguries and injuries in both sports, but have always been glad none were career-ending. After reading the comments in this forum, I'm reconsidering the doctors' proscriptions. I ski to live and live to ski, it's my 'fountain of youth." There are another 6 weeks of snow ski season and the whole summer for water skiing. I believe I am competent to get on the "board(s)" and "ski lite" this year. So, should I take this year off, being the wise old 65 year old that I should be, or follow the advice I've read here, which is:
    "Limit risk, don't let risk limit you..."
    "I am apalled at how much folks are increasingly willing to trade in safety for freedom,"
    "No Eternal Reward will forgive us now for wasting the dawn..." Jim Morrison

    Any advice for me, please?
    Tough one. I think I mentioned this before, but most doctors are going to offer advice that is on the extreme side of the risk-adversity spectrum. Whereas, people who ski, bike, etc. gravitate toward the risk-tolerance end of that spectrum. The key is finding a reasonable balance between the two. I've continued to ski because I feel confident that I can do so without concussing or injuring myself. Naturally, I've dialed it back though. But there are times when I feel I'm being stupid and reckless. I've done a bit of bc tree skiing with other and alone. I try to maintain complete control, but it wouldn't take much for me to catch an edge or run into a stump and royally screw myself. Anyhow, I guess my advice would be to maybe get a second opinion from another doctor, and really emphasize how important snow/water skiing is to you.

    More Serena Williams news below. Sounds like she hasn't had the best time with the Lovenox shots. Yeesh.

    NEW YORK -- Serena Williams says it was "the scariest moment in my life" when blood clots were recently discovered in her lungs.

    But the 13-time Grand Slam champion said on NBC's "Today" show Wednesday that she hopes to return to tennis this summer after recovering from a recent pulmonary embolism followed by a hematoma.

    Williams spoke from Los Angeles, saying she hasn't left the house much since going to the hospital on Feb. 18 when she said she "couldn't breathe."

    Williams said she had a CT scan of her lungs and they "found several blood clots." Her treatment involved self-injecting blood thinners. As a result, she developed a hematoma in her stomach that grew to the size of "a grapefruit" and it was surgically removed.

    Her absence from tennis could stretch to almost a year since winning the Wimbledon title in July.

  7. #32
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    The radiologist popped his head out today, saw the shadow of a remaining clot, and declared three more months of Coumadin.

    Fuck. So long early season mountain biking.

  8. #33
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    Oct 2008
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    Sorry man. Let's go get some easy turns next month somewhere.

  9. #34
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    May 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKbruin View Post
    The radiologist popped his head out today, saw the shadow of a remaining clot, and declared three more months of Coumadin.

    Fuck. So long early season mountain biking.
    Yep, 5th month of the blood thinner myself and the ultrasound still shows a similar remnant of the clot in the leg. I've cleaned my act up; joined a gym (a local CrossFit), gone w/ a "Paleo" diet, picked up a WaterRower, dusted off an old Vasa Trainer I got for dirt cheap, dropped close to 30 pounds off my frame, stronger than I have been in years, and despite it all including wearing compression socks 24 hours a day, I still have the clot.

    What the crap! At great investment of time and money, I have stacked the cards in my favor but I still have to wait for the doc to bring me down off the blood thinner. I'm just now getting weaned off the blood thinner with a lower dose of warfarin and now combined with aspirin.

    My hope was to get some snowboarding in before the season ends her in Colorado. Not sure if I will even get any May turns in at A-Basin before they close. Worse yet, the doctor says that there is a chance that DVT patients can rebound with another clot when getting off the blood thinners. That would re-start the 6 month or more clock.

    This is a crazy mind game for people like us who are active and then are suddenly sidelined with a DVT. I'm even fighting for my job/career on the outcome of this clot. If it becomes a life long deal, I'm screwed and will need to find another line of work.

    I tell ya, it motivates me at the gym, on the home exercise equipment, and at the dinner plate.

    I see my hematologist next after Easter so I'll probably get the, "let's stay on the conservative path" speech again from him and will spend another couple of months on lighter doses of blood thinners.

    What a journey this has been. But you know, I have heard stories about people who know people who have died from blood clots. So I'll probably stick with my doc's plan of slowly taking me off the blood thinners........

    Freaking sucks!!!!!!!

  10. #35
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    May 2010
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    Six months of rat poison down the hatch. Monday I see the hematologist and hope to get some good news. I ran a couple of miles today as part of my workout of the day (WOD) for CrossFit along with a bunch more exercises. Other than a slight twinge in the leg (both legs for that matter), I feel good. I'll post back up on Monday. With some luck, I might get some late season runs in here in ColoRADo.

  11. #36
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    May 2010
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    FINALLY OFF THE RAT POISON!

    My hematologist has cautiously given me the ok to stop the warfarin. The doc was impressed that I used the six months to get back in shape and has given me the green light to return to my favorite activities.

    Going to get some corn in the bowls at Loveland this weekend........

  12. #37
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    Great news, LBK and enjoy those turns!

  13. #38
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    May 2010
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    Been meaning to share some post rat poison footage. I go see my hematologist Tuesday for a follow-up since he pulled me off the warfarin and put me on a couple of baby aspirins daily. I scored over two full months of riding Ski Loveland and A-basin. I hit it today up the Basin despite temps down in Denver being about 90 degrees. So lucky to have had an extended season out here. Will also be up at A-basin to ride their closing day, the 4th of July!!!

    Here's some raw footage of me cruising A-basin last run of the day on June 12th. Nothing spectacular but definitely fun summer snowboarding considering I missed most of the season due to the leg clot.


  14. #39
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    Dec 2006
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    So, some 7 months since I was first diagnosed, I still have the fucking clot apparently. My regular doctor was hoping that the clot would be gone by Memorial Day Weekend, but it wasn't. Apparently, it's gotten a little better since November but is still present. He recommended that I stay on the warfarin for another 6 months.

    I decided to see a doctor specializing in sports medicine for a second opinion. He was pretty much ready to get me off the warfarin until he he was able to see the most recent doppler, which revealed that part of the clot was above the knee (which presents a greater danger). He recommended that I see a vascular surgeon/expert, which I'm set to do on Wednesday.

    In the meantime, I've been mountain biking (fast but not as aggressive as I would otherwise) and started lifting weights again (big compound exercises like squats, deadlifts, bench, etc.). I've noticed that my left calf, which is where the clot is, feels swollen. I wasn't really getting this sensation before when I was just BC skiing.

    Anyhow, what really sucks about this is that I keep hoping for and expecting to be able to take the next step or move on in some way. But, instead, I seem to be stuck in a holding pattern with this stupid fucking clot. I have no idea what's going on. I've been able to bike and ski, but I do so at quite a risk.

    Anyhow, just an update/venting/rant. In sum: Fuck.

  15. #40
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    Mar 2008
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    Dude, that sucks, it's so frustrating when the medical professionals don't seem to know what to do with you. Glad you are lifting/riding etc. and wish you the safest and best progress you can possibly make. Keep us updated.
    "The skis just popped me up out of the snow and I went screaming down the hill on a high better than any heroin junkie." She Ra

  16. #41
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    Feb 2009
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    Starting up with niacin & asprin again. Calf is swelling again. Coffee/beer, little activity, i need to work like Rumsfeld, standing.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by tone capone View Post
    Dude, that sucks, it's so frustrating when the medical professionals don't seem to know what to do with you. Glad you are lifting/riding etc. and wish you the safest and best progress you can possibly make. Keep us updated.
    Thanks, man. And keep posting the biking photo stoke! Sounds like you are in a somewhat similar position as I was--e.g., having to take it easy on mellower terrain. It's still 100x better than not being able to ride at all. When I was on my ass for 2 months with a broken wrist, I dreamed about riding the most wussified of flowy singletrack.

    Quote Originally Posted by senior researcher View Post
    Starting up with niacin & asprin again. Calf is swelling again. Coffee/beer, little activity, i need to work like Rumsfeld, standing.
    Compression stocking?

  18. #43
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    Good news! I saw the vascular surgeon yesterday, and he was completely confident that I no longer need to be on the rat poison. His simple advice was "go live your life," which was so damned good to hear.

    So, here's what I've learned:

    The Cause: All of the doctors I've seen agree that my mountain biking crash at Whistler (wacking the hell out of the back of my left leg without causing a fracture) was almost certainly the causal event given that I'm youngish (35), haven't had any clot problems in the past, am relatively fit, and have no hereditary history of blood disorders. I've also done a little independent internet research and contusion-caused blood clots are not uncommon among athletes, particularly soccer players. Both the sports medicine specialist and the vascular surgeon were so confident on this issue that they have told me that there's no need to do any testing for a blood disorder once the rat poison is out of my system.

    The Clot: The clot is still there. While it's diminished a little since I was first diagnosed in November, it's pretty much solidified by this point. The vascular surgeon said it's extremely unlikely that it will break loose and cause a pulmonary embolism. At the same time, it will probably be with me for life.

    Doctors And Second Opinions: I learned the value of second and third opinions and the advice of specialists. Most GPs deal with clots in the elderly or perhaps those with blood disorders. My situation was different and so my GPs didn't seem to totally know how to handle it when the clot was still there after 6 months. However, if I had only relied on the advice of my GP (and not sought out opinions from other doctors), I'd be on the blood thinners for another 4-5 months and be worrying about what the hell is wrong with me.

    The Future: Basically, I'm going to do just what the vascular surgeon recommended: live my life as I normally would. The only difference is that, at least for the next year, I'll wear a compression stocking for long drives and flights to increase blood flow and comfort. Because of the clot, the other veins or arteries in my left leg are going to have to work harder to redistribute blood in my leg. I didn't notice anything when I was backcountry skiing, but I do notice that my left calf swells a bit during longer bike rides. So far, I can't say this has affected my performance. Also, because of the redistribution, I'm more likely to get varicose veins in the future. Considering the scar from my previous Whistler accident, I'm going to have one nasty looking left leg. While varicose veins are kind of nasty, I can totally live with them so long as I can continue to do my thing. I've always been a pants guy, anyhow.

    The Immediate Future: While I don't want to ride/ski in injury-avoidance manner, I am fully cognizant of how much it truly sucks to be unable to do ride/ski at all because of an injury. I don't mind getting hurt (pain and sometimes humiliation) so much as I hate being hurt (being unable to ride/ski as I want). So the key will be balancing fun, progression, and aggressiveness on one hand with longevity on the other hand. This is the kind of bike/ski calculus that 30-somethings consider in much more depth than 20-somethings.

    Still, I've given orders to the missues to prepare meals with as much leafy greens as possible (broccoli, spinich, kale, chard, etc.) to expedite the rat poison from my system. I hope to ride downhill at Northstar this weekend and shed some blood.

    *******
    If anybody wants more information, advice, etc. in the future, feel free to PM me or just post in this thread.

  19. #44
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    The reason the GPs wanted to keep you on Warfarin was a matter of self-interest on their part. If you suffer a trauma while on it and subsequently bleed to death, it’s your fault (and they may never even find out about it). If they take you off it and you get another clot or PE, it’s their fault. So, ultimately, it’s up to you to do the risk analysis.

    As for your conclusions on getting multiple opinions, they are correct. Not just second or third, but as many as possible. Medicine is more art than science and you will almost invariably learn something new from each doctor. GPs tend to be pretty useless, though. And never listen to the U/S techs, they love to spew bullshit without having the slightest fucking clue what they’re talking about. If possible, have the vascular surgeon him or herself do the U/S.

    The clot, as you say, will be with you for life in one form or another. It sounds like you are at the stage where it is hardening into something resembling scar tissue. The reason clots so often happen in the calf of the leg is a result of the imperfections of evolution. Basically, our circulation system is still designed for a four-legged animal. Therefore, we have these over-sized calves that have to work as what the medical profession calls “the hearts of the legs”, pumping blood to the heart against the force of gravity. There is also an anatomical reason that clots are more likely in the left leg than the right, but I can’t explain it without drawing a picture.

    I am going to offer some advice for the future that you are not going to want to hear (and you can take it for a grain of salt, because I am not a doctor and this is the internet, after all). Wear the compression stocking not just for long flights and drives, but as often as possible and especially during athletic activity. I’m surprised the VS didn’t explain this, but the reason your leg swells is because the clot permanently damaged the valves in the vein. As your leg attempts to pump blood to the heart through that vein, the valves do not shut and the blood pools lower in your calf. The best way to improve circulation, lessen the effects of post-thrombotic syndrome and avoid varicose veins is the compression stocking. It’s demeaning, inconvenient, occasionally uncomfortable, etc. but you will be doing yourself a favor in the long run. If you’re a “pants guy”, all the better.

    Anyway, you are past the hardest part of the illness, enjoy the rest of your life and be happy this wasn’t worse than it was, because it could have been.

  20. #45
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    May 2010
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    Right on AKbruin! Off the rat poison!!!! Go rip it up an live your life to the fullest despite the remnants of the clot in your body. Mine is still there as of an ultrasound last month. Sure it has ben a life altering event for me and caused me to get back into shape (35 pounds down and eating a clean diet) but I'm back on the slopes and skateboarding here and there. Not too shabby for a middle aged punk. And for those compression socks, I'm freaking wearing them 24/7 just to keep ahead of the clotting causes. They even look like I'm starting a fashion trend sporting compression sock, shorts, and old school Vans shoes.

    Some days are better than others for my veins. CrossFit keeps my moving but at times ends up with my calfs hurting like all get out especially when doing box jumps or double under jump ropes in the work out for the day. But overall I'd rather have them cart me off the floor from being active rather than being inactive.

    Keep up the mountain biking and the deep and steep skiing. I'll be doing the same on my snowboard and hitting the CrossFit gym.

    LBK

    PS here is my most recent vid from the 4th of July at A-basin. Note the Surfrider Foundation 2011 membership T-shirt. I did the run in honor of my terminally ill father who passed away a few days later from a battle w/ melanoma cancer. Sure glad I was able to catch a flight the next day to see him, talk with him, and tell him I loved him before he passed away. My Dad lived a full life and I strive to do the same despite any clot.......


  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by senior researcher View Post
    Starting up with niacin & asprin again. Calf is swelling again. Coffee/beer, little activity, i need to work like Rumsfeld, standing.
    Go yell at your HR if you need a stand-up desk. The fear of a WC claim should make them buy it for you.

  22. #47
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    Jan 2004
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    Bumb.

    What a great source of information TGR is. Good info here...helps a little (a bit of freaking out happening here, damn)

    I've got venous thrombosis in my right subclavian vein.

    The lab test results are yet to come but the first diagnosis is this:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paget-Schroetter_disease

    There might be also some genetical reasons (however haven't ever suffered any symptoms after the long flights or anything). But the lab tests come soon, so we'll see.

    38 years old...just had a hectic fall, lots of work and stress...and somehow tried to keep up with my friends doing a lots of bouldering, also one week's surf trip in October. I guess doing furious short-time upper body work-outs with too little stretching and rest caused this one...Also too little variety perhaps (normally I've always tried to squeeze in some longer, low pace work-outs too, this fall I just didn't have too much time or energy left for that)

    On the "rat poison" pills for some three months. The vein got operated (thrombolysis) but the docs now want to make sure the clot don't recur (by thinning the blood). After that, everything might be allright (for good)...however if there is something wrong structurally (muscles/ligaments physically compressing the vein), I might also need a surgical operation to make some room for the subclavian vein.

    So, out for serious skiing for some time. I'll try to keep thinking positive. Planning to ski tele w/ my daughters, teaching them and also cross country skiing. Shit, I guess I'll try some joga/pilates whatever to train my core properly (now that you can't just have fun...)

    But anyone knowing more about this Paget-Schroetter syndrome? Docs that ski/bike/surf etc. Any info HIGLY appreciated.

    PS. English is not my native language...so all these medical terms confuse me, and the language might be a bit akward
    "Average summit heights are around 1000m to 1200m but on the high glaciers of the main Lyngen Peninsula there are summits over 1400m with Jiehkkevarri being the highest at 1834m above sea level."

  23. #48
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    Jiehkevarri- Sorry to hear about your predicament. Unfortunately, I don't know anything about Paget-Schroetter syndrome. My advice would be to actively seek out second and third opinions, even if you have a lot of trust in the doctor who gave the original diagnosis.

    As for activities, you can probably still ski, but, yeah, you'll want to tone it down. I found myself increasingly skiing tougher terrain, and, in retrospect, that was stupid. But, I also skied a lot with my daughter, which was awesome.

    Anyhow, hang in there and I hope everything turns out okay for you.

  24. #49
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    My advice would be to actively seek out second and third opinions, even if you have a lot of trust in the doctor who gave the original diagnosis.
    Thanks. I guess that's pretty reasonable. I am lucky that way that one good friend of mine is sports doctor and another specialized in internal medicine. I can always consult them and compare the info to the original diagnosis.

    Well, the good thing is that I've just lately found tele-skiing...I guess this early winter is for fine tuning those free heel turns on the easy groomers (and skiing w/ kids). Core work-outs, longer low-pace endurance training is on the list too.

    I definitely hope this turns out to be temporary/without too serious long-time consequenses (fingers crossed...the doc is about to call me within an hour!).
    "Average summit heights are around 1000m to 1200m but on the high glaciers of the main Lyngen Peninsula there are summits over 1400m with Jiehkkevarri being the highest at 1834m above sea level."

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jiehkevarri View Post
    Thanks. I guess that's pretty reasonable. I am lucky that way that one good friend of mine is sports doctor and another specialized in internal medicine. I can always consult them and compare the info to the original diagnosis.

    Well, the good thing is that I've just lately found tele-skiing...I guess this early winter is for fine tuning those free heel turns on the easy groomers (and skiing w/ kids). Core work-outs, longer low-pace endurance training is on the list too.

    I definitely hope this turns out to be temporary/without too serious long-time consequenses (fingers crossed...the doc is about to call me within an hour!).
    Good luck! Also, hippy pow turns are always enjoyable, no matter how extreme or rad one is.

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