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  1. #3951
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    tetons
    Posts
    6,552
    this is the coolest bus Iíve ever seen. just spotted in Moab and Vermont plates too
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    skid luxury

  2. #3952
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Aspen
    Posts
    562
    Quote Originally Posted by mattig View Post
    Worried about this, yes.
    Bed, ski rack, heat, inverter for boot dryers, ventilation, stripper pole. I can worry about other non-essentials later.
    Stop worrying and start living - https://www.commercialtrucktrader.co...450-5002459602

  3. #3953
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    on the banks of Fish Creek
    Posts
    601
    Sweet.... preinstalled stripper pole. That thing is ready to rock.

  4. #3954
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    8,044
    That party bus is sending mixed messages.

  5. #3955
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    Just so we're clear on the points made on pop-up vs hardside in the PNW, mattig & others...

    West of the Cascade crest in WA and OR, winter weather is too consistently wet for the fabrics of a pop-up to dry. They mildew and rot in like two or three years if kept outside. Indoor parking is just about mandatory, where the camper can be popped and dried fully after each outing.

    East of the crest... not a problem, and youbetcha I'd have one if I lived out there, or anywhere in the Rockies or Southwest. Warmth isn't a huge problem for hardy skifolk, though the 4-season hardsides are way easier to keep warm for wives and chiles.

    Less critical, though still a factor for ski camping, is the snow loading. I've seen Big Steve's nice FWC sag alarmingly under a foot of heavy pow at Alpy, to the point that I'd be afraid to sleep in such a space. Two feet of 20% density snow, on the area of my camper roof, weighs over 3000 pounds.

    The best conditions to have a ski camper include the max nuke stormage, but in heavy and abundant coastal pow, popups are a chore to constantly clear.

    Here's my rig at Alpy, for reference:


    Attachment 253716
    Iíve been sleeping in a FWC popup for the last three seasons in PNW snowpack. It is a bit more of a chore than a hard side to keep clear during big dumps. However, having a first generation Tacoma, a hard side is out of the question. I have a forced air propane furnace and rock a generator for the batteries in the winter. This allows me to stay out for up to 5 days with no regard to propane use, longer if I was careful. Condensation is always an issue in the winter no matter if youíre sporting hard side or pop up. Iíve never been wet though.
    My routine looks like this. Wake up turn on heater make coffee. Wipe down the ceiling and around the edges for condensation. Crank up heat and open roof vents a bit. Dress. Shovel roof. Turn off heat and go ride. Come home. Shovel roof (5min), fire up generator. Change into camp clothes. Dry ski/snowmobile gear out on boot dryer/rack. Eat dinner. Go out one last time before bed, pull snow off roof, turn off generator and sleep. Repeat till done. Only a few times have I had to get up in the middle of the night to pull snow off during huge storms. But when itís dark at 430 and your asleep by 8 getting up at 3am is no big deal. Generator, boot dryer and forced air furnace are key to keeping dry and batteries happy.
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  6. #3956
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    1,050
    Quote Originally Posted by WestCoast View Post
    Iíve been sleeping in a FWC popup for the last three seasons in PNW snowpack. It is a bit more of a chore than a hard side to keep clear during big dumps. However, having a first generation Tacoma, a hard side is out of the question. I have a forced air propane furnace and rock a generator for the batteries in the winter. This allows me to stay out for up to 5 days with no regard to propane use, longer if I was careful. Condensation is always an issue in the winter no matter if youíre sporting hard side or pop up. Iíve never been wet though.
    My routine looks like this. Wake up turn on heater make coffee. Wipe down the ceiling and around the edges for condensation. Crank up heat and open roof vents a bit. Dress. Shovel roof. Turn off heat and go ride. Come home. Shovel roof (5min), fire up generator. Change into camp clothes. Dry ski/snowmobile gear out on boot dryer/rack. Eat dinner. Go out one last time before bed, pull snow off roof, turn off generator and sleep. Repeat till done. Only a few times have I had to get up in the middle of the night to pull snow off during huge storms. But when itís dark at 430 and your asleep by 8 getting up at 3am is no big deal. Generator, boot dryer and forced air furnace are key to keeping dry and batteries happy.
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    How dare you complicate a decision I thought I'd already made with logic and first hand experience?!

    Can any pop-up mag comment on noise annoyance factor from snow plows, etc?

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  7. #3957
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    51
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  8. #3958
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    4,833
    How do manage the post-trip dry-out period with your rig? Got a dry place to park?

    Mattig... even the hardsides are not going to keep out the noises of plows, neighbors, groomers, etc.
    PE, Mechanical Engineering
    University of Bridger Bowl Alumnus
    Alpental Creeper

  9. #3959
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    1,050
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    How do manage the post-trip dry-out period with your rig? Got a dry place to park?

    Mattig... even the hardsides are not going to keep out the noises of plows, neighbors, groomers, etc.
    Yeah, I know, but trying to get a feel for the improvement. For the money, I'm pretty well sold on the Capri at this point. Especially since they'll fully customize and ship it to within a day's drive of me by early December.

    That way I can build it out to be the true "one night only" camper I need.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  10. #3960
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    OOTAH
    Posts
    2,233
    Quote Originally Posted by mattig View Post
    How dare you complicate a decision I thought I'd already made with logic and first hand experience?!

    Can any pop-up mag comment on noise annoyance factor from snow plows, etc?

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    2 words ear plugs! I wear them even when there are no snow plows around in my hard side. IME the heater fan kicking on and off is as annoying as the plows.
    Samuel L. Jackson as Jules Winnfield: Oh, I'm sorry. Did I break your concentration?

  11. #3961
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Sun Peaks Resort
    Posts
    413
    My "Arctic Package" insulated soft side does a good job of retaining heat but not so good at keeping out noise. Ear plugs are the answer. The propane furnace makes a noise as well but it is the sound of warmth and comfort.

  12. #3962
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    51
    Itís a task but I spend an inordinate amount of time in my. I commute to work and stay in it. This is at sea level and the condensation isnít as bad down there and gives me time to air out. Iíve got my venting system down and one of those fast drying towels I wipe up condensation with every morning. It takes just a minute. Then I just blast the heater and kick on the roof vents. It all seems to evaporate fine. When there are more than two people is when it gets tight and funky. Iíll bring in the mattress and dry it out inside if needed. Never really seems to need it. Three years and hundreds of nights and it still smells fresh as a daisy. Keeping a positive temp gradient and airflow is the key. Is a full size camper and truck better? Yes. But Iím rocking this setup and with a little maintenance, shit is dialed.


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  13. #3963
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
    Posts
    13,381
    WC, sounds like a good routine, pretty similar to ours. We have a 2014 FWC Hawk, which replaced a 2000 Hawk I bought used in 2004. On longer mid-winter trips, we strip off the Arctic Pack liner each day and towel off the canvas. On warmer (<20F) sunny winter days, we strip off the AP liner and open the top vents and canvas screens while we ski. On very cold days, we blast the furnace at the warmest/sunniest part of the day (mid-afternoon, usually) to melt any frozen condensation, then towel off. It's not that much of a hassle, maybe 15-20 minutes a day at most, often less.

    Dealing with condensation and minimizing odors are keys to prolonging RV life. We cook outside when possible, have a single burner Coleman stove top fueled by one of the camper propane tanks. (FWCs now come with two propane tanks.) We change up our fare for winter trips. No frying inside. We use travel mugs for coffee, put the lids on ASAP to cap steam.

    I store our FWC Hawk inside our shop building, making it easy to dry it out between trips.

  14. #3964
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    3,486
    I have an econo size box of foam ear plugs for wood working etc, but man I couldn't envision sleeping in them. Does it even really help? I mean if you can carry on a normal conversation with them how does it muffle a heater? I thought they were only for sharp noises with excessive decibels.

    Sweet pics WestCoast

  15. #3965
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
    Posts
    13,381
    Quote Originally Posted by Rideski View Post
    I have an econo size box of foam ear plugs for wood working etc, but man I couldn't envision sleeping in them. Does it even really help? I mean if you can carry on a normal conversation with them how does it muffle a heater?
    It really helps me, although FTR I use only one ear plug because I am single-side deaf (had my inner ear removed and #8 cranial nerve severed 5+ years ago). I cannot carry on a conversation at normal levels with properly installed high NRR ear plug -- I can hear a soft muzzled tone but cannot detect words. Are you installing them properly, i.e., enlarge ear canal by pulling up top of ear with opposite arm over top of head during install? See pic below. (Be sure to pack tweezers if a plug gets too deep in your ear canal.) IME, some types and brands have higher noise reduction ratings (NRR). My current favorite is Mack's Snore Blockers, which have a high NRR (32) and ruffles on the outside end for easier removal with fingernails. Leight Sleepers also work well for me.


  16. #3966
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    51
    I sleep like the dead, no need for plugs personally. At work I sleep at an airport in my popup. Snow plows ainít got shit on an airplane or helicopter spoolin up.
    Geezer, thatís the same rules I have in regard to cooking in the camper. I heat up leftovers or soup and grill cheese type thing. I really love the maneuverability of these little campers. Light and fast.


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  17. #3967
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    3,486
    For sure installed correctly, but I have the standard home depot type. I think they have a noise rating listed but been a while since I looked. When I shoot I use over ear mufflers.

    Got me curious enough to go look, they are NRR 29

  18. #3968
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    4,833
    Quote Originally Posted by WestCoast View Post
    Geezer, thatís the same rules I have in regard to cooking in the camper. I heat up leftovers or soup and grill cheese type thing.
    Well you're welcome to come over to my ol beater camper, where the bacon is fresh... lol

    I will have a nice pop-up one day... your rig is a nice size for 1+dog. Butt for now I'm happy to have this sagging ol horse to put away wet.

    Difrt strokes n styles... I appreciate them all.

    So is mattig gonna spend $15k on some slick custom???
    PE, Mechanical Engineering
    University of Bridger Bowl Alumnus
    Alpental Creeper

  19. #3969
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    Well you're welcome to come over to my ol beater camper, where the bacon is fresh... lol

    I will have a nice pop-up one day... your rig is a nice size for 1+dog. Butt for now I'm happy to have this sagging ol horse to put away wet.

    Difrt strokes n styles... I appreciate them all.

    So is mattig gonna spend $15k on some slick custom???
    Thereís certainly something to be said about having a beater truck and camper. Rock whachoogot.


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  20. #3970
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    1,050
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    Well you're welcome to come over to my ol beater camper, where the bacon is fresh... lol

    I will have a nice pop-up one day... your rig is a nice size for 1+dog. Butt for now I'm happy to have this sagging ol horse to put away wet.

    Difrt strokes n styles... I appreciate them all.

    So is mattig gonna spend $15k on some slick custom???
    They got a nice one on their site for 11k.

    But for how stripped down i'd order it a new one wouldn't be much more

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  21. #3971
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
    Posts
    13,381
    Quote Originally Posted by WestCoast View Post
    There’s certainly something to be said about having a beater truck and camper. Rock whachoogot.
    Norseman's truck is not a beater. That's his alter ego dirtbag anti-poser hippie trying to trick you

  22. #3972
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    back40
    Posts
    603
    Quote Originally Posted by GeezerSteve View Post
    ...Dealing with condensation and minimizing odors are keys to prolonging RV life.

    I store our FWC Hawk inside our shop building, making it easy to dry it out between trips.
    We run a dehumidifier after skiing to dry gear out while camping. When parked at home in the shop we leave a dehumidifier with auto on settings plugged in 24/7.

  23. #3973
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Access to Granlibakken
    Posts
    6,800
    Webasto diesel heaters are the shit. I have six ducts throughout the van, and can keep it as warm as I want. Mine is plumbed straight from the main 26 gal tank but some prefer a separate tank filled with kerosene.

    At any rate...quiet, uses very little electricity, and even on sub-zero nights I’m using 1/4 to maybe 1/2 gallon of diesel. 100 amp-hr solar battery gets charged when I’m driving, so I never need or think about a generator.

    20+ days of no hotels in a season saves $$$$ quickly.

    The Webasto automatically varies the flow depending on the difference between set point and interior temp. So if the van interior is already warmish from driving or parking facing the sun, the heater right away operates at a low setting that you can barely hear.

    I insulated roof / walls with 1 to 1.5” thick rigid foam, and all interior metal is covered by thick synthetic fuzzy felt, so no condensation issues at all except front windshield which I squeegee off in the morning.

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    194 Praxis Carbon Ullrs for sale, $290: https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...54#post5606654

  24. #3974
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    486
    These are the ear plugs you want. Silicone based so they mold to your inner ear, tear them in half so they don't protude, come in a handy case you can leave on your nightstand. I keep a pair in my winter sleeping bag zip at all times. Amazing when you have a snoring girlfriend too...
    https://www.amazon.ca/Speedo-Silicon...55159507&psc=1

  25. #3975
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    401
    https://overlandex.com/pop-up-camper-info

    I don’t think that this can be beat for a winter use pop up. It’s the passive house of the pop up world.

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