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  1. #3576
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    Jun 2011
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    324
    Thanks for that good starting point. What is SRW stand for?

    I heard diesel has itís issues in cold winter?? Would gas mileage and torque over weight that hassle and bit more cost on diesel fuel itself not to mention that diesel motor cost more?


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  2. #3577
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    Jun 2011
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    SRW = none dually


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  3. #3578
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    Jun 2011
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    Do any of these above trucks come with bench front seat making it legal for 6 people???


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  4. #3579
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    The CH
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeezerSteve View Post
    Which Palomino Backpacker series? AFAICT, the lightest models with shower is >2,000 lbs. If you're considering a lightweight hardside for a 1/2-ton pickup, check out Pastime campers. AFAIK, Pastime currently makes the lightest hardsides. Also, maybe rethink an interior shower, which takes up lots of room in a 6-1/2' slide-in.

    I've seen some nice FWC shell mods.
    I've never heard of Pastime campers. Are they well made? The website doesn't have much info.

  5. #3580
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Eburg
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    Pastime camper construction is fine. They are lightweight. Bigfoot or Northern Lite would be a much better choice for winter use, but you should have a 3/4-ton or 1-ton truck to carry them.

    Quote Originally Posted by tmokes View Post
    Is that a pop up camper??
    The one posted by myles long? That's a popup, a FWC Fleet shell model. You can get a liner for winter use, stays plenty warm. Very nice lightweight setup if you have a truck and use it for other purposes, but again, for a dedicated RV consider other options.

    Popups are a bit more aerodynamic than slide-ins, but not by that much and IMO it's not a big factor when making an RV choice. The bigger advantage of FWCs is that they have a lower COG and they flex on rough roads and when off-roading.

  6. #3581
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Valley of the Sun
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    3,955
    The diesel Colorado is an interesting option. The zr2 would be a sweet rig for getting to some remote areas with a lightweight pop up. Not for a 30K budget obviously.

  7. #3582
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Der Town
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    6,249
    Quote Originally Posted by tmokes View Post
    Thanks for that good starting point. What is SRW stand for?
    Single Rear Wheel, as opposed to a dually.

    I heard diesel has it’s issues in cold winter?? Would gas mileage and torque over weight that hassle and bit more cost on diesel fuel itself not to mention that diesel motor cost more?
    Yes, but newer trucks are fine, especially in the Cascades. It never gets that cold. My 2008 Ford sat for 3 weeks and I started it on a 15 degree morning on the first crank, no block heater.

    I get high teen MPG with my slide-in camper. The extra power and torque is a game changer when pulling steep passes and driving in traffic. I've had gas 3/4 ton trucks and wouldn't ever go back. Main thing, if you're buying used, get one that had the emissions equipment removed early in its life but wasn't hot rodded. The emissions equipment is what kills most of these trucks and causes all kinds of problems. (not going to fly obviously if you live in King County or some other place with testing...) If you have to have all EPA stuff intact, 2011+ Fords, or 2007+ Dodges, or any Duramax seem to survive the emissions stuff okay.

    Quote Originally Posted by tmokes View Post
    Do any of these above trucks come with bench front seat making it legal for 6 people???


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    Yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by GeezerSteve View Post
    Bigfoot or Northern Lite would be a much better choice for winter use, but you should have a 3/4-ton or 1-ton truck to carry them.

    Popups are a bit more aerodynamic than slide-ins, but not by that much and IMO it's not a big factor when making an RV choice. The bigger advantage of FWCs is that they have a lower COG and they flex on rough roads and when off-roading.
    There are trade-offs to both. I can't go the places that Big/Old/Diy Steve can, but the places I can get my experience is much more like a cabin and much less like a tent.

    What's important? (Pick one.) Being able to drive the roughest roads to some cool gnar spot and have a bed and kitchen but deal with flappy walls, colder interior temps and moisture management issues? (Pop-ups are still just a fancy tent.)

    Or have a big dumb truck that's 28' long, can only be driven on nicely improved gravel roads with 12' of overhead clearance but is super warm, easy to deal with condensation, and quiet? (We have camped in some very severe winter storms in our bigfoot. 80+ mph winds and 0 degree temps. Wouldn't want to sleep in that kind of weather in a pop-up.)

    There's also the middle road of Alaskan Campers, which are a little like both. Pluses and minuses to those campers.

  8. #3583
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    324
    Flex on rough road and off road big issue for most of family oriented camping? Snow rutted dirt road / parking lot is probably as rough as it gets for my use... potholes?

    Iím not planning on taking it to a dedicated 4x4 trails like in San Juan Colorado.


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  9. #3584
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Agrestic
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    4,764
    Since we're discussing it if I was to buy a Tacoma or similar truck and wanted a slide in (popup or not) what should I be looking for? The girlfriend and I have been looking at vans but my hooptie isn't going to last forever. I don't need a large truck so the Tacoma would be my daily driver. I don't need a bathroom but would like a sink.

  10. #3585
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    Aug 2011
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    Der Town
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmokes View Post
    Flex on rough road and off road big issue for most of family oriented camping? Snow rutted dirt road / parking lot is probably as rough as it gets for my use... potholes?

    I’m not planning on taking it to a dedicated 4x4 trails like in San Juan Colorado.


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    totally fine. but you might think twice about squeezing up that tight forest road with no turn around.


  11. #3586
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Co
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leavenworth Skier View Post
    For $30k total I'd be looking at a 1 ton SRW Diesel truck for around $15-20k. I'd strongly consider an extended cab long bed unless you and the GF plan on another kid, then a 4 door long bed would be the way to go.

    2011+ Fords are excellent trucks. 1999-2001 Fords (7.3 Powerstroke) are good, although not as nice. 2001.5 - 2010 (6.0/6.4 Powerstroke) Fords are hit or miss, some are good but you have to know what to look for.

    Dodges have great engines (Cummins), but the transmissions can have some issues until you get in to the really new stuff. Also Dodges are expensive, because Cummins redneck love.

    Any of the Chevy Duramax trucks with the Allison transmission have a good track record for the most part. There are some specific years/engine block lot numbers that had problems, but not the wide spread issues like the mid 2000 Fords.

    On the camper, no question I'd be looking at getting a Bigfoot or Northern Lite. For ski area camping they really are the best you can get. Anything from the mid-90s onward are great. Should be able to get a nice one for between $5000 - 10k
    Pretty much this, except not all Cummins love is redneck, some of us are just smarter than ford/Chevy fanboys and want a better power plant. And not all Dodge transmissions suck, only the ones that donít have a clutch.

    Go with an early 2000s 4 door long bed in any of the 3 flavors and youíll be good to go (just avoid Ford 6.0s). That should leave plenty of money for a nice slide in. As for diesel vs gas, diesel will get better MPG but diesel fuel often costs more. Diesel will have an easier time going against a head wind or up hill but is a few minutes worth the cost? Gas will have fewer cold temp starting issues but it needs to be really cold for that to come into play. Diesels are a lot more $$$$ to buy and fix. I personally own a diesel and Iím not sure Iíd do it again, especially for slide in which is really pretty light comparatively speaking. My camping get up weighs in at about 10k lbs and while I appreciat my diesel itís not absolulty necessary.

  12. #3587
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
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    13,381
    Quote Originally Posted by concretejungle View Post
    Since we're discussing it if I was to buy a Tacoma or similar truck and wanted a slide in (popup or not) what should I be looking for?
    FWC Fleet w/ side dinette or front dinette would be my choice for a Taco

  13. #3588
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    324
    Thanks! I agree that I donít ďneedĒ diesel motor, but yeah those who are into trucks all want big diesel trucks with manual transmission... I think automatic is fine too for my intended use.


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  14. #3589
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    SŲlden
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    374
    Something to think about, unless you are towing something fierce. You really don't need a diesel unless you can afford it..I say again...unless you can afford it.
    I used to be sold on diesel's(and have had a Cummins,Powerstroke ,and early 6.5/6.2 GMC between two different trucks) until I realized I didn't really need one just by a cost/benefit analysis.
    Example
    2012 Ford F-250/350 w/ 6.7 diesel with say 100-150k miles on it is still $20k+
    2012 Ford F-250/350 w/ 6.2 gasser with same mileage is $10-15k all day long.
    Now, if you want the power and can afford it by all means. If you are towing 10k around day long, yes it would be nice to have those lower RPM's and power going through the mountains. If you are on a budget, want a 3/4 / 1 ton truck, then definitely consider going the gas route.
    Don't buy into "well diesel's run to 500k!". Yes, that is correct but so do gas motors and everything that has 500k on it has tons of replacement parts whether it is gas or diesel. You will find Ford 6.0/6.4 Powerstroke's being rebuilt at 150k, but have a Chevy 6.0 gasser with 300k on it no problem.
    As per above, don't try to buy a 1/2 ton truck to put a 2500lb hardside loaded on and pull a 7k trailer. It just is not safe for anybody involved.

  15. #3590
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    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leavenworth Skier View Post
    . . . flappy walls, colder interior temps and moisture management issues? (Pop-ups are still just a fancy tent.)
    Nah. Don't conflate them with pop-up canvas trailers, which are fancy tents. But that's not an accurate description of popup slide-ins. FWC walls don't flap. (I've had a FWC for 14 years, so I know this.) Moisture management is an issue with all RVs and it's actually less of an issue with FWCs than most other RVs because FWCs are the easiest to thoroughly dry out. FWC w/thermal pack liner is plenty warm and not an issue.

    The two advantages of hardsides: FWCs interior space is a smaller (quite a bit smaller compared to really big hardsides like Arctic Fox or the biggest Lances) although plenty big for 2 people, and popups are not as good for stealth camping in town.

  16. #3591
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    324
    Speaking of rebuilds, any tips on buying an used truck? Some are grocery getter while others are commercially used, towed heavy things... itís the same for cars, but percentage of trucks used as commercial or towed heavily is higher. Aside from having mechanics look at it, what else? Just completely avoid heavily used trucks? Would it be ok if it was from a dealership like certified preowned/ expired lease? I hate the idea of ex lease vehicles...


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  17. #3592
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    611
    Quote Originally Posted by Tryingtostaywarm View Post
    Something to think about, unless you are towing something fierce. You really don't need a diesel unless you can afford it..I say again...unless you can afford it.
    I used to be sold on diesel's(and have had a Cummins,Powerstroke ,and early 6.5/6.2 GMC between two different trucks) until I realized I didn't really need one just by a cost/benefit analysis.
    Example
    2012 Ford F-250/350 w/ 6.7 diesel with say 100-150k miles on it is still $20k+
    2012 Ford F-250/350 w/ 6.2 gasser with same mileage is $10-15k all day long.
    Now, if you want the power and can afford it by all means. If you are towing 10k around day long, yes it would be nice to have those lower RPM's and power going through the mountains. If you are on a budget, want a 3/4 / 1 ton truck, then definitely consider going the gas route.
    Don't buy into "well diesel's run to 500k!". Yes, that is correct but so do gas motors and everything that has 500k on it has tons of replacement parts whether it is gas or diesel. You will find Ford 6.0/6.4 Powerstroke's being rebuilt at 150k, but have a Chevy 6.0 gasser with 300k on it no problem.
    As per above, don't try to buy a 1/2 ton truck to put a 2500lb hardside loaded on and pull a 7k trailer. It just is not safe for anybody involved.
    What about early 2000s era trucks? Seems like a 7.3l diesel over a V10 gas for a few grand more could be worth it if it's a one ton camper hauler.
    Common sense. So rare today in America it's almost like having a superpower.

  18. #3593
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,690
    You gotta pay that 7.3 powerstroke premium.

  19. #3594
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Co
    Posts
    1,175
    Quote Originally Posted by tmokes View Post
    Speaking of rebuilds, any tips on buying an used truck? Some are grocery getter while others are commercially used, towed heavy things... itís the same for cars, but percentage of trucks used as commercial or towed heavily is higher. Aside from having mechanics look at it, what else? Just completely avoid heavily used trucks? Would it be ok if it was from a dealership like certified preowned/ expired lease? I hate the idea of ex lease vehicles...


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    If you find one thatís clean and tidy and isnít chock full of poorly executed mods snatch it up. Donít worry too much about how itís been used, these trucks are built to work so work doesnít bother em. If itís clean and not abused then itíll have as good a chance of serving you well as any other truck. If you go diesel watch for signs of aftermarket tuners as they are probably the easiest way to destroy a perfectly good engine. Itís not a guarantee but if done stupidly they can kill an engine quick.

  20. #3595
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Co
    Posts
    1,175
    Quote Originally Posted by Tryingtostaywarm View Post
    Something to think about, unless you are towing something fierce. You really don't need a diesel unless you can afford it..I say again...unless you can afford it.
    I used to be sold on diesel's(and have had a Cummins,Powerstroke ,and early 6.5/6.2 GMC between two different trucks) until I realized I didn't really need one just by a cost/benefit analysis.
    Example
    2012 Ford F-250/350 w/ 6.7 diesel with say 100-150k miles on it is still $20k+
    2012 Ford F-250/350 w/ 6.2 gasser with same mileage is $10-15k all day long.
    Now, if you want the power and can afford it by all means. If you are towing 10k around day long, yes it would be nice to have those lower RPM's and power going through the mountains. If you are on a budget, want a 3/4 / 1 ton truck, then definitely consider going the gas route.
    Don't buy into "well diesel's run to 500k!". Yes, that is correct but so do gas motors and everything that has 500k on it has tons of replacement parts whether it is gas or diesel. You will find Ford 6.0/6.4 Powerstroke's being rebuilt at 150k, but have a Chevy 6.0 gasser with 300k on it no problem.
    As per above, don't try to buy a 1/2 ton truck to put a 2500lb hardside loaded on and pull a 7k trailer. It just is not safe for anybody involved.
    I always say my Cummins will last well past 500,000 miles but Iíll put the cost of 3 gas engines into it to get it there. Just spent $3k in parts to change injectors at 160,000 miles. Gas engine #1.....

  21. #3596
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,690
    Quote Originally Posted by tmokes View Post
    Thanks! I agree that I donít ďneedĒ diesel motor, but yeah those who are into trucks all want big diesel trucks with manual transmission... I think automatic is fine too for my intended use.


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    Diesel with manual? You are going back a few decades. Better be a part time mechanic if you go back that far.

    Get a Tacoma with a FWC. All the cool kids with cash are doing it. Ultra low maintence approach. Check out Juniper Overland. They just opened in CO. Don't know where you are,

  22. #3597
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    324
    Thanks! Start looking at Craigslist now. Does any slide in works as long as the length and weight are good? Width? Height, especially the bed wall? Is that what is called? Cabin heights from the bed floor and sidewalls from the bed floor?


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  23. #3598
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    15,481
    Quote Originally Posted by tmokes View Post
    Thanks! Start looking at Craigslist now. Does any slide in works as long as the length and weight are good? Width? Height, especially the bed wall? Is that what is called? Cabin heights from the bed floor and sidewalls from the bed floor?


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    IMHO find a solid truck first then find a camper that is suitable for your truck. You're going to need a way to get the camper home.

    But first, think a lot about your intended use and decide how big and what features you want in the camper. That is going to dictate the truck.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  24. #3599
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
    Posts
    13,381
    Quote Originally Posted by tmokes View Post
    Width? Height, especially the bed wall? Is that what is called? Cabin heights from the bed floor and sidewalls from the bed floor?
    Width is seldom an issue. Full size pickups are >48" between wheel wells so one can slide a sheet of plywood between the wheel wells. Campers are a bit narrower than that.

    Re sidewall height, many slide-ins will require shims under the camper. Easy. Cab height is rarely an issue, except for a few years of Fords. Same remedy (shims). Be sure that camper bottoms on bed or shims on bed, not hanging on sidewalls.

    You should have no problem fitting 95%+ of hardsides slide-in in any domestic full size PU truck. OTOH, there are some quirks with some popup/pickup combos, e.g., older FWCs in T100s.

  25. #3600
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    258
    Quote Originally Posted by GeezerSteve View Post
    Pastime camper construction is fine. They are lightweight. Bigfoot or Northern Lite would be a much better choice for winter use, but you should have a 3/4-ton or 1-ton truck to carry them.

    The one posted by myles long? That's a popup, a FWC Fleet shell model. You can get a liner for winter use, stays plenty warm. Very nice lightweight setup if you have a truck and use it for other purposes, but again, for a dedicated RV consider other options.

    Popups are a bit more aerodynamic than slide-ins, but not by that much and IMO it's not a big factor when making an RV choice. The bigger advantage of FWCs is that they have a lower COG and they flex on rough roads and when off-roading.


    I just got the arctic pack on the inside of mine...makes a huge difference. Stays nice and toasty down to single digits. Had it out at mammoth a few times and even when its that cold, no issues. Just gotta make sure you dont run out of propane!

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