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  1. #51
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    5
    Here are some books which you may like or can consider of reading.

    1. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay (Michael Chabon, 2000, Random House)
    2. Just Kids (Patti Smith, 2010, Ecco)
    3. The Scott Pilgrim Series (Bryan Lee O’Malley, 2004 – 2010, Oni Press)
    4. Tess of the D’Urbervilles (Thomas Hardy, 1891)
    5. Monster Rally (Charles Addams, 1950, Simon and Schuster)
    6. Transition Plan by Bob Russell (with Bryan Bucher)
    7. Gospel in Life (Tim Keller)

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    Seattle
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    18,042
    Quote Originally Posted by hev View Post
    I fully enjoyed the Millenium trilogy and would recommend as a fun light read.
    I didn't really feel like it was a light read at all. I'm actually a little surprised how popular the books are considering the length and density of them.

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    EC
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    1,192
    Quote Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
    Fiction recs: The Signal - Ron Carlson
    good outdoor action yarn. Carlson is a really tight short story writer for the most part, but this novel is an entertaining and engaging read
    OK - one down a bunch more to go. Good read - made me want to go hiking and fishing and camping. But I was bummed he didn't get the girl back in the end.

    I got caught up in a couple other reads including Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal's book and George W. Bush's book, both of which I have started and have many pages ahead of me.

    Also, I flew through Rigged by Ben Mezrich which was outstanding - a great read that felt like a combo of Boilier Room and a Hunter Thompson book. But I also started Islands in the Stream by Hemingway - I forgot how crazy his characters were. Good stuff. And of course, I'm reading chapters here and there from David Goodman's latest book Best Backcountry Skiing in New England.

    Spats, I'm putting your book on my list. Looking forward to it.

    I've read the entire Cormac McCarthy quiver - he's probably my favorite writer. Can't wait for his next one.
    Last edited by JMO; 01-11-2011 at 07:01 PM.
    People shooting ski areas should be sued.

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,666
    So recently read the Lost City of Z. its about amazonian explorers and well written

    Similarly in that vein. Check out the River of Doubt. its about Teddy Roosevelts expedition to map/explore one of the amazonian tributaries

    Also In the heart of the sea:the tragedy of the whale ship essex

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    7,262
    picked up World War Z for the transatlantic flight and read it over the holidays. nothing like a zombie book to get you in the christmas spirit. surprisingly good. the author has an incredible imagination in thinking through all the possible scenarios that could go down in a zombie apocalypse.

    note: not the best thing to read before bedtime.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Building a fighting force of extra-ordinary magnitude
    Posts
    2,497
    A Prayer For Owen Meaney by John Irving. absolutely awesome.
    thats new hampshire as fuck


    We ain't eager to be legal, so please leave me with the keys to your Jeep Eagle.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    2,988
    Been listening to Malcom Gladwell's books lately. All are super interesting.

    Finished Blink and The Tipping Point thus far and am in the middle of Outliers. Still have to start What the Dog Saw.

    Definitely suggest checking them out.
    Seriously, this can’t turn into yet another ON3P thread....

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    Seattle
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    Quote Originally Posted by hev View Post
    I am kind of a Bill Bryson whore. His new one At Home is proving up to his usual standards and I'd recommend to anyone if you like funny non-fiction.
    I'm in the middle of it now. Definitely very interesting. Not as funny as his more autobiographical books, but you'll definitely learn a lot by reading it. You'll find out very quickly there's a lot you don't know about the history of things you use every day in your home. For example, the modern can opener with the two wheels and twisting handle wasn't invented until 1925.

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    The in-between
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    949
    Seconds on Lamb and Brighter Than A Thousand Suns. Lamb is one of the few books that made me laugh out loud many times over.

    I recommend, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon.
    Shut your eyes and think of somewhere. Somewhere cold and caked with snow.

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    New Haven Line heading north
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    2,702
    Quote Originally Posted by Helldawg View Post
    Not "vampire" as in twilight or any of the "blood" series types. Think more like dark-seekers from I Am Legend. Could not put it down. Gonna be a trilogy too.
    Interesting about the trilogy. I read the book, enjoyed it very much, but thought the ending was really lousy. And now I know why.

    I don't know if he can get another 1500+ pages out of the story though.


    I would also like to add "Winter's Tale" by Mark Helprin. I have never read another book like it.
    Last edited by Stu Gotz; 01-25-2011 at 09:07 PM.
    Charlie, here comes the deuce. And when you speak of me, speak well.

  11. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    1,666
    i really liked the passage too.though honestly i thought the ending was good and agree that i don't know how he can get more out of it.

    i would be ok with the way it ends as is

  12. #62
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    1,553
    the lone survivor-marcus luttrell
    indian country-philip caputo
    the voyage-philip caputo

    I like everything I've read by caputo

  13. #63
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Truckee, CA
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    5,731
    I found both Cormac's No Country for Old Men and The Road to be kinda meh, but have heard that Blood Meridian is totally tits. On the fence about it, though, based on my dislike of the aforementioned, but could be easily toppled.

    I'm also seriously considering going on a full-tilt Charles Portis bender:
    Norwood
    True Grit
    The Dog of the South
    Masters of Atlantis
    Gringos

    Haven't read any of 'em nor do I know a single soul who has, but based on the Coen Bros. version of TG, which seems pretty damn true to the book, methinks that Portis will be a good yarn spinner.

    P.S.
    Ron Carlson's short stories are solid...check out the At The Jim Bridger collection.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  14. #64
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Portland, OR, U.S.A.
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    2,529
    Quote Originally Posted by crackboy View Post
    So recently read the Lost City of Z. its about amazonian explorers and well written

    Similarly in that vein. Check out the River of Doubt. its about Teddy Roosevelts expedition to map/explore one of the amazonian tributaries

    Also In the heart of the sea:the tragedy of the whale ship essex
    You and my dad could form a book club, same exact book recs he was talking up over x-mas. I read Lost City of Z and really liked it. I'm taking a break from Roosevelt currently so River of Doubt is on hold until next summer.
    another Handsome Boy graduate

  15. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    1,666
    hey they are all good books. and it seemed like the OP was looking for adventure type dealios

    one of my favorite books is The Gun Seller by Hugh Laurie. Awesome if you like dry british humor.

  16. #66
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1

    Awesome book- White Planet

    Hey JMO,
    You were looking for a good book awhile back and here's one that I think you will like- White Planet: A Mad Dash through Modern Global Ski Culture. It's written by Leslie Anthony (he's written for Powder and SKIER) and details the evolution of skiing and skiing culture. It's funny and the only romance going on is with the pow.
    Here's a review of it:
    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/...rticle1879126/

  17. #67
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    the edge of wuss cliff
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    17,239
    Quote Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
    I found both Cormac's No Country for Old Men and The Road to be kinda meh, but have heard that Blood Meridian is totally tits. On the fence about it, though, based on my dislike of the aforementioned, but could be easily toppled.
    The Road wasn't that great. I liked No Country better as a film. But Blood Meridian is wild. The most disturbing book I've ever read. Blood Meridian and Child Of God are my two favorite from C.McC.

  18. #68
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    781
    reading "breaking the limit" by karen larsen right now.. pretty good.... she rides her harley from new jersey to alaska and back. kind of an adventure story i guess.
    picking up a copy of "Deadly Spin: An Insurance Company Insider Speaks Out on How Corporate PR Is Killing Health Care and Deceiving Americans" by wendell potter tomorrow.. title speaks for itself.
    what's so funny about peace, love, and understanding?

  19. #69
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    WI
    Posts
    4,134
    Apparently the books I read are like the popcorn movies of literature. The not inspirational or informative, but they are fun reads. I just finished 207 Bones, which is by a producer of the TV show Bones. I don't watch the show, but the person that gave me the book said the book reads like the show.

    I just started Camel Club, which is the first book in series a series of 5 books so far. I've already read the third book, Stone Cold before I realized it was part of a series and I hope this one is as good.


  20. #70
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    boy's club
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    890
    can anyone recommend a good history of judaism, or pirates?
    "he doesn't know to behold what the cold frost can do..."

  21. #71
    doughboyshredder Guest
    the camel club books are great. I'm on the third one in the series, and I love them. Of course I haven't read anything by Baldacci that isn't great.

  22. #72
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    Überville, with the Überites!
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    2,505
    Quote Originally Posted by nateski View Post
    can anyone recommend a good history of judaism, or pirates?
    Ok... it's not Judaism, but it touches on it, as their history is often intertwined with Arabic and Islamic history:



    "Destiny Disrupted" by Tamim Ansary - it's a "history of the world through Muslim eyes." It's a crazy good read, absolutely fascinating. It was written very conversationally, as if you were "talking over a beer" at a bar. The last chapter or two really set the stage for the turmoil over in Egypt and general "unrest" in the Middle East. They really build on the info in the rest of the book, though. It really makes you realize how utterly ignorant Americans are of the ways and desires of Muslims, Arabs, Islamists, Middle Easterners, etc.
    Fighting foot fungus one public bath house at a time!

    My site

  23. #73
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Denver
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    2,846
    Just finished "Unbroken" by Laura Hillenbrand. Hands down the most unbelievable story I've ever read. I can't think of the last time I was this enthralled by a book.


  24. #74
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    992
    Dipstik, looks interesting: thanks for the posting it.

    And I don't think I've - or anyone else - has mentioned it yet but "Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs" by Chuck Klosterman is absolutely brilliant. I'm not even into that much "American culture" things like TV, movies, pop culture, etc. (mainly just books and music) but I still loved it. His other books are pretty good too.

  25. #75
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Truckee, CA
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    5,731
    tonight i stumbled upon the trailer for this new movie called Limitless and while the film looks kinda meh, it mentioned that it was based on the novel The Dark Fields by Alan Glynn.

    i read this book several years ago and it was a serious page-turner. it's basically a modern update on Flowers for Algernon and definitely worth the read.

    Glynn's latest, Winterland, looks intriguing, as well...
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

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