Page 31 of 31 FirstFirst ... 26 27 28 29 30 31
Results 751 to 769 of 769
  1. #751
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    SLC, Utah
    Posts
    3,492
    Quote Originally Posted by babybear View Post
    Recently read ďA Distant Mirror ď generally about the 1400ís

    https://www.amazon.com/Distant-Mirro...1-5cff1dc6b1dc

    What struck me was the authorís writing about how society changed after the black plague (or itís many renditions) and how the outlook and demands of the workforce shifted.
    The book was written in the 70ís but it really mirrored what we have been seeing after covid. A distant mirror indeed.
    Funny, one of my best friends just finished that and said the same thing. He remarked that the parallels to our world right now are startling. Really interested to pick that up next.

    Sent from my Pixel 6 Pro using Tapatalk

  2. #752
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    25,849
    Quote Originally Posted by babybear View Post
    Recently read ďA Distant Mirror ď generally about the 1400ís

    https://www.amazon.com/Distant-Mirro...1-5cff1dc6b1dc

    What struck me was the authorís writing about how society changed after the black plague (or itís many renditions) and how the outlook and demands of the workforce shifted.
    The book was written in the 70ís but it really mirrored what we have been seeing after covid. A distant mirror indeed.
    The second book in Ken Follett's "Kingsbridge" series titled World Without End covers this era and that workforce shift is one of the plot points in the book. I've read the first two books in that series (first one is Pillars of the Earth which is set in the 12th century and concerns building a cathedral in England). Both fun reads.

  3. #753
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    12,605
    Just finished Cormac Mccarthy's new one, The Passenger. I believe the follow up, Stella Maris, comes out today, but I think I need to give it a bit before I wade into that one.

    I liked The Passenger - I love Mccarthy's writing, and he has a knack for painting brutal yet hilarious pictures. I'm not sure I'm really smart enough to understand what the book's about, because it certainly doesn't present any tidy resolutions to that question. It winds around through a series of tangents and vignettes that loosely present the relationship of a family, the patriarch of which was an inventor of the atomic bomb. But I'm still undecided if the book really had a central message or if it wanted to mostly just present an assortment of ideas to chew on.

  4. #754
    Rasputin's Avatar
    Rasputin is online now Полые тростник на ветру
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Missoula
    Posts
    4,117
    I've re-read a few books since my magazine subscriptions stopped ("reading room" material), including The Book of Enoch as translated by R.H. White , The River Why by David James Duncan, and Siddhartha by Herman Hesse.

    Recently, I've started reading The Urantia Book, as some "Light reading". Wading through the forward's definitions of Deity, God, The Eternal Son, Heavenly Father, Supreme Being, the various energy states these names are assigned to, and the various types of reality we inhabit and may evolve to, has been challenging. It's heady stuff, from a distantly, otherworldly, perspective.
    I form the light, and create darkness: I make peace, and create evil: I the LORD do all these things. -אלוהים אדירים

  5. #755
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    In Full Compliance
    Posts
    1,665
    Is this thread mainly fiction? If so I apologize, I only read non-fiction.

    Now reading Peril by Bob Woodward. Highly recommended for poly-sci buffs.

    Golden Boy by John Glatt was a page-turner, especially for anyone familiar with the prep school > Ivy League > Wall Street pipeline.

    At the moment my go-to for book recommendations is the excellent resource Books We Love: NPR which has an excellent search/filter function and covers 2022-2013

  6. #756
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    In Full Compliance
    Posts
    1,665
    The Twilight World by Werner Herzog

    I found this book fascinating. Incredible subject, amazingly talented writer/director. Notes from the publisher:

    In his first novel, Herzog tells the incredible story of Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier who defended a small island in the Philippines for twenty-nine years after the end of World War II.

  7. #757
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Truckee, CA
    Posts
    8,075
    The Thousand Crimes of Ming Tsu

    Quote Originally Posted by Sirshredalot View Post
    I've been enjoying The Thousand Crimes of Ming Tsu by Tom Lin recently. It's an interesting take on a modern, violent western with some supernatural elements to the story.
    Thanks for the rec.
    I dug it, although the ending was a bit predictable and it did succumb to a few familiar and worn tropes (most notably the noble savage/mystical native).
    But it has some wonderful layers in regards to memory, reincarnation, and redemption.

    In a similar vein I would highly recommend:
    The Magic Wagon - Joe R. Lansdale
    Dead In The West - Joe R. Lansdale
    The Sisters Brothers - Patrick deWitt
    Dragon Teeth - Michael Crichton
    Walking Wolf - Nancy Collins
    Lynch - Nancy Collins
    True Grit - Charles Portis

    and while not a Western, it is about a traveling freak show:
    Freezer Burn - Joe R. Lansdale

    Also, this review of The Thousand Crimes of Ming Tsu is worth the read:

    https://www.npr.org/2021/06/03/10021...es-of-ming-tsu
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  8. #758
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Not in the PRB
    Posts
    30,321
    Quote Originally Posted by schindlerpiste View Post
    Educated, 2018.
    A memoir or a Mormon girl named Tara Westover
    I'm in the middle of this, it's fantastic.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin
    "I'd eat a bag of Dicks and wash it down with a Coke any day." - iceman

  9. #759
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Not in the PRB
    Posts
    30,321
    Just finished Educated. Best book I've read in a long time.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin
    "I'd eat a bag of Dicks and wash it down with a Coke any day." - iceman

  10. #760
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Last Best City in the Last Best Place
    Posts
    6,107
    Been listening to a couple Harlan Coben audiobooks recently. That guy never wastes a sentence. Great for passing the time driving to and from Big Sky.

  11. #761
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Truckee, CA
    Posts
    8,075
    Masters of Atlantis - Charles Portis
    A droll satire of secret societies, cults, and political witch hunts, this novel from the author best known for True Grit, unveils a rambling odyssey about family and belonging, albeit in the most untraditional of definitions.

    Cool op-ed/review of the novel here:
    [article does contain some plot spoilers]
    https://slate.com/culture/2020/12/ma...comedians.html
    Last edited by dookeyXXX; 02-16-2023 at 06:49 PM.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  12. #762
    Join Date
    Feb 2023
    Posts
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by tgapp View Post
    This is literally in bed next to me.

    Murakami is interesting, and 1q84 is a fascinating read, but not an easy one. It drags a bit since it's essentially three books, but I still recommend it all the time.
    Sent from my Pixel 6 Pro using Tapatalk
    Just amazing reading

    Last edited by JamesTeter; 03-13-2023 at 02:16 PM.

  13. #763
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    SLC, Utah
    Posts
    3,492
    Just finished Cormac McCarthy's new two novel set The Passenger and Stella Maris. Both are interesting and compelling reads that fit in thematically, if not structurally, with the rest of his body of work. Don't go into them expecting a shoot em up Western - these books are very different than All The Pretty Horses or Blood Meridian - but they both represent an incredible exploration of love, grief, philosophy, and math. Highly recommend if you're a fan of the author.

    Sent from my Pixel 6 Pro using Tapatalk

  14. #764
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    关你屁事
    Posts
    8,614
    “The Artisans” by Shen Fuyu. A collection of little village vignettes over a hundred years, as told to Mr Shen by his father and grandfather, as the village gets swallowed by change.

  15. #765
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Before
    Posts
    26,720
    I just finished rereading “the cunning man” by Robertson Davies. The guy is way overlooked; brilliant, subtle and deft writing mostly about in this case the spectra between formal religion and faith untethered by doctrine , an access to beauty and solace absent dogma.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  16. #766
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    482
    I'm reading through Jeff Guinn's Waco; David Koresh, the Branch Davidian's and a Legacy of Rage.

    I've been sort of fascinated with this, ruby ridge, the bundy's lately...to a point at least.

    Also picked up Virga and Bone from Craig Childs. Only skimmed a few pages at the library but it showed promise of some great desert writing so looking forward to this one

  17. #767
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,349
    Probably been mentioned before but Ą The Worst Hard Timeď by Timothy Egan was pretty hard to put down.

  18. #768
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Missoula
    Posts
    1,979
    Yeah I've liked all the Timothy Egan books I've read. That one, big burn, lasso the wind, and just finished breaking blue.

    Just started red notice that I think I found recommended in here a few pages back. barely into it and holy shit.

  19. #769
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    914
    Iím enjoying this more than I imagined I might:



    The writing is a little breathless at times, but itís very engaging.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •