Page 26 of 27 FirstFirst ... 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 LastLast
Results 626 to 650 of 660
  1. #626
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    2,821
    Iím about halfway through it. Itís definitely a good read. Iím able to follow it pretty well so far, since I had been exposed to a lot of this stuff before.

    There arenít any equations (other than E=mc^2), which I guess makes it more approachable for the masses. On the other hand, without equations, it becomes a very high level summary, rather than a ďproofĒ, but I guess thatís what he meant by ďbriefĒ.

  2. #627
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Truckee, CA
    Posts
    7,398
    While I have yet to read anything by Whitehead, I believe his name has been dropped in this thread, plus dude has 2 Pulitzers to his name. This may be the novel of his I dive into (at some point in thw future as I am presently mired in both Dune and My Heart Is A Chainsaw...).

    https://amp.theguardian.com/books/20...-noir-thriller
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  3. #628
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    2,821
    Quote Originally Posted by billyk View Post
    Iím about halfway through it. Itís definitely a good read. Iím able to follow it pretty well so far, since I had been exposed to a lot of this stuff before.

    There arenít any equations (other than E=mc^2), which I guess makes it more approachable for the masses. On the other hand, without equations, it becomes a very high level summary, rather than a ďproofĒ, but I guess thatís what he meant by ďbriefĒ.
    To clarify what I meant to say, I think I can follow most of the concepts he talks about, since I have heard about them before, and even studied some of them (like special relativity). But some things (like general relativity) Iíve read about, but canít say I really ďunderstandĒ in more than a superficial manner. I have a hard time really picturing how gravity bends space-time to cause the earth to circle the sun.

    This book makes me aware of a lot of these concepts and theories, peppered with a lot of personal anecdotes, and behind the scenes info that you donít normally see discussed in physics textbooks. Like how these two scientists did most of the work, but that other guy got the award, etc.

    But I canít really say this book makes me understand these things any better. A lot of them are just pure mysteries to me that I have to take on faith are proven or even plausible.

    But it is a good jumping off point to go explore further in other books. I wish I had read this book when I was still in school studying physics, although that may have been before this book was written.

  4. #629
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Vacationland
    Posts
    4,770
    Into The Raging Sea, the sinking of El Faro by Rachel Slade

    Also; Stranger In the Woods- story of the Maine Northwoods Hermit is incredible. Dude lived in the woods for 27 years within a few miles of where he grew up, he said one word to another human in all that time. Passing a hiker in the woods he said, 'Hi'

  5. #630
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Central OR
    Posts
    5,706
    If youíre looking for physics books ala Hawking with more clarity, seek out Carlo Rovelliís trilogy: Reality Is Not What It Seems, The Order of Time, Seven Brief Lessons on Physics. All are excellent, and accessible for a layperson.

  6. #631
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    snow country, Japan
    Posts
    910
    Granted I havent gotten the book yet but I am really looking forward to Broken Alliances: Inside the Rise and Fall of a Global Automotive Empire about Carlos Ghosn and what happened with him and Nissan. I have ordered it but it wont arrive for a few more weeks.

    https://www.amazon.co.jp/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    If you are interested in what happened to Carlos Ghosn, I would suggest starting with these Asia Times articles by Roger Schreffler and read them from oldest - newest as they will give you a good idea. Fuckin mental that.

    https://asiatimes.com/author/roger-schreffler/
    パウダーバカ!!

  7. #632
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Truckee, CA
    Posts
    7,398
    Bad Monkeys - Matt Ruff

    Picked this up at the local used bookstore as the cover had been grabbing my eye for a few years. That and all the hype around Ruff's other novel, Lovecraft Country.
    Glad I threw down the 6 bucks-and-change.
    This is a smash-and-grab kind of read that engages quickly and then shakes you around a bit.
    It's like a combo of 12 Monkeys, Usual Suspects, and The Matrix, if they were all genre blended into a psych eval.
    Plus there's clowns. Lots of clowns.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  8. #633
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Last Best City in the Last Best Place
    Posts
    4,899
    Just finished Liz Phair's book Horror Stories. Not your typical rock n roll memoir at all, more a collection of essays with stories woven in. I liked it. One of those books that gets stronger as it goes along. She's a good writer and brutally honest.

  9. #634
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    14
    The last my book was Flowers for Algernon. The book is written in the diary genre. It is easy to read, in one breath. Affects very subtle levels of the human psyche. Things are rising that many of us have thought and are thinking about ... I was surprised in one place by the description of the hero, which looks like he is in a meditative state: the body expands, merges almost with the universe, etc. I liked the book very much, because I am very interested in the psychology of the human soul and this kind of work: the description of the sensations of the most experimented is amazing and unusual.

  10. #635
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    23,865
    Anthony Doerr, who wrote All the Light We Cannot See, has a new novel that just came out called Cloud Cuckoo Land.

  11. #636
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Truckee, CA
    Posts
    7,398
    Found myself in Berkeley/Oakland this weekend (saw Primus perform Rush's A Farewell To Kings).

    Whilst there I hit up Pegasus Books in Oakland, Dark Carnival in Berkeley, and Moe's on Telegraph Ave.

    My haul:
    Holy Cow - David Duchovny (yes, Fox Mulder writes books...)
    Horrorstor - Grady Hendrix
    Nightmare Alley - William Lindsay Gresham (Guillermo del Toro's latest film is an adaptation of this revered noir)
    The Getaway - Jim Thompson (Have seen both of the film adaptations, but never read the source...)
    Lovecraft Country (hard cover) - Matt Ruff (loved his novel Bad Monkeys)
    Lucky Alan and Other Stories - Jonathan Letham (probably one of my favorite authors...)

    As if I needed more books, too...
    Last edited by dookey67; 10-18-2021 at 12:21 AM.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  12. #637
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Babylon
    Posts
    11,786
    Mostly through " Project Hail Mary" from Andy Weir who wrote " The Martian "
    Soo good
    Simular in style but not story

  13. #638
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    3,118
    Quote Originally Posted by Woodsy View Post
    Mostly through " Project Hail Mary" from Andy Weir who wrote " The Martian "
    Soo good
    Simular in style but not story
    ^ Highly recommend. Enjoyed it more than The Martian (which was great).

    For those with a history bent, 1491 has been great thus far (about 2/5 through).
    Seriously, this canít turn into yet another ON3P thread....

  14. #639
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Babylon
    Posts
    11,786
    Quote Originally Posted by iggyskier View Post
    ^ Highly recommend. Enjoyed it more than The Martian (which was great).

    For those with a history bent, 1491 has been great thus far (about 2/5 through).
    1491 is fantastic, read the follow up 1493 too. Amazing
    if you liked those "Island at the Center of the World" is a revealing insight into NYC & the times of the settlement of America.

    I may have recommended that 60 pages ago....

  15. #640
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    786
    Iím really looking forward to reading The Dawn of Everything by Graeber and Wengrow. I have a birthday this month and then Xmas is coming, so I stop buying things for myself in October.

  16. #641
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Truckee, CA
    Posts
    7,398
    Nightmare Alley - William Lindsay Gresham (1946)
    Step right up folks and wrap your eyes around the gloriously dark and seedy world of a conceited carnival clairvoyant.
    A nice choice for Noirvember reading.

    RIYL
    Pimp; The Grapes of Wrath; Geek Love; Freezer Burn
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  17. #642
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    tetons
    Posts
    7,856

    Time for a new book - any suggestions?

    Quote Originally Posted by Woodsy View Post
    1491 is fantastic, read the follow up 1493 too. Amazing
    if you liked those "Island at the Center of the World" is a revealing insight into NYC & the times of the settlement of America.

    I may have recommended that 60 pages ago....
    maybe you were the one that recommended 1491/1493 to me originally? (or maybe flyoverlandcaptive?)

    anyway- I echo all the accolades- such good reads and then I also had a good line up going through the rest of charles mann (1493 and the Wizard and the prophet)
    Then moved onto simon winchesterís books, since they are very similar style- Atlantic, pacific, krakatoa, the crack at the edge of the earth, etc. all so good.

    Who here recommended ďFuzzĒ by Mary Roach? I think I got the rec here
    anyhow- fun, fast read about wildlife/ human interactions and she is a funny writer
    skid luxury

  18. #643
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Central OR
    Posts
    5,706
    So many good books lately; this one stands out:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Image1637132511.242027.jpg 
Views:	44 
Size:	497.0 KB 
ID:	393004

  19. #644
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Central OR
    Posts
    5,706
    I read a ton of good books this year; these are all recommended. I donate most books to the local library, but if anyone wants any of these, theyíre yours for shipping.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3427.JPG 
Views:	49 
Size:	198.1 KB 
ID:	393533

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_3426.JPG 
Views:	54 
Size:	206.5 KB 
ID:	393534

  20. #645
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Truckee, CA
    Posts
    7,398
    The Southern Book Club's Guide To Slaying Vampires - Grady Hendrix

    Just polished off this breezy horror novel that manages to mix up soap opera melodrama, Southern charm, and, well, vampires into a well paced yarn.
    This is the second book I've read by Hendrix and I gotta say, dude knows how to string sentences together nicely.
    While his book club members are more or less classic archetypes of Southern ladies, he delivers their adventures with the right amount of warmth and just enough social commentary subtext.
    He also manages to tweak the vampire mythos in an intriguing manner, while still paying reverent homage to the origins of the genre.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  21. #646
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Last Best City in the Last Best Place
    Posts
    4,899
    Been reading A.B. Guthrie's Big Sky series lately. Interesting stuff, different than I expected. Dark. Good writer though.

  22. #647
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    16,308
    Taste: My Life Through Food https://www.amazon.com/dp/1982168013...H46D3EKCMP55JM

    Worth the read. Turns out we grew up in the same town, with the same mothers and traditions. Go figure.
    Is it radix panax notoginseng? - splat

  23. #648
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    16,390
    I just finished Whiteheadís Harlem Shuffle
    Def worth a read
    Gonna start McBrideís Deacon King Kong next

  24. #649
    Join Date
    Dec 2021
    Posts
    3

    Cool

    Ultralearning by Scott Young

    Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande. Atul`s book helped me a lot to improve my work style. I always made common mistakes because of the "human element" or lack of attention. So, guided by Atul I developed my own checklists and they saved my back, literally, several times.
    Last edited by JJThompson; 01-05-2022 at 07:58 AM. Reason: additional thoughts

  25. #650
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,204
    Quote Originally Posted by StaceeJJ View Post
    Ultralearning by Scott Young

    Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande
    Atul is incredible. "Being Mortal" is spectacular...but also really heavy. I think I was crying on a plane when I finished it.

    I am reading "Powder Days" and I think most skiing maggots would appreciate it. "Outside contributing editor Heather Hansman’s new book is both a critical take on the ski industry and love letter to its skids" The writeup from Outside: https://www.outsideonline.com/cultur...n-book-review/

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •