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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by coach View Post
    Hi folks - don't mean to spam but I figure a few of you on here might enjoy this book:

    http://www.abdou.ca/canterburytrail.html

    It was penned by my wife as her PHd dissertation. It's a modern day take on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - set in a small BC mountain town that many of you may recognize. It even contains accurate usage of the word jong. I shit you not.

    Maybe give it a pass if you have an aversion to skiing, course language, pot, alcohol or sex.

    And if you do enjoy it please spread the word.

    Cheers,

    Coach
    Damn, no Kindle edition available. Still will probably order it for some summertime reading.

  2. #102
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    Oct 2003
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    Currently reading and loving...(but will definitely need some grown-up reading afterwards)

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    People shooting ski areas should be sued.

  3. #103
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    May 2006
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    Life with a 4 month old has severely crippled my reading time but I just finished:

    When the Killing's Done- Definitely not Boyle's best work but entertaining enough.

    Gallatin Canyon- Some hits, some misses, but mostly good.

    Everything Ravaged, Everything Burned - Some of the best new short stories I've read in a while. My wife thought it was too depressing to finish but I loved them.
    "They don't think it be like it is, but it do."

  4. #104
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    Jun 2006
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    I'm almost done reading "The Tiger" by John Vaillant. Pretty kick-ass rad.

    I never knew an animal as rad as the Amur Tiger exsisted. Hopefully they keep on exsisting. What a complete badass!

  5. #105
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    Oct 2003
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    I just read the Hunger Games trilogy. I got them for the kids but decided to check it out, pretty good read and fast.

  6. #106
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    Oct 2003
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    I'm rereading "Of Human Bondage" by Maugham. Last read it probably in college or so. Awesome book. If Philip Carey doesn't strike a nerve for you I don't know what literary character will.

  7. #107
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    Mar 2008
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    For dog people The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein. Its a story narrated by a "philospoher" dog, Enzo, about his life with his family. Its a quick read, I read it on a flight from Charlotte to Denver, and its very funny and also very sad at times.

    If you live in the west, check out Cadillac Desert which is about water policy and politics in the west starting with John Wesley Powell exploring the Green River down to the Colorado and ultimately through the grand canyon all the way to 1992 (the second edition was published in 1994). Its much more interesting than you would think and it will really make you reconsider the way you look at water. A great read if flying across the country because you can look out the window and see the things the book is discussing.

  8. #108
    doughboyshredder Guest
    One of the best sci fi trilogies ever. In Her Name : The Omnibus edition.
    Posted a thread just for it, cause it's that freaking good. Must read if you're in to epic sci fi. And, it's cheap on the kindle.

  9. #109
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    Donovan Creed series on the Kindle. Funny, fast vacation reds and at .99 a book hard to go wrong.

  10. #110
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    Just read A Movable Feast by Hemingway again. Not one of his more popular books but worth it. Get the first edit if you can find it.

  11. #111
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    Mar 2008
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    Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card, as well as Ender's Shadow, Xenocide, Shadow of the Hegemon, basically the whole Ender series.

  12. #112
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    Oct 2003
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    I'm still on my rock star kick. Just picked up the Keith Richards book, "Life." Excellent opener about getting busted in Arkansas in 1975 with a carfull of dope and booze and a drunk judge pulling a bottle of whiskey from his sock and a police chief who wants to send these girly English boys to the slammer. That's how you start a book.

    People shooting ski areas should be sued.

  13. #113
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    Sep 2006
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    Recently wrapped the first 3 of the 4-part "Vurt" books:

    Vurt - solid cyberpunk yarn with plenty of action and nifty wordplay. Easily stands alone (i.e. no real necessity to read the next 3 books in the loose series unless you're a complete diehard).

    Pollen - Second book in the Vurt series. A bit more convoluted and took me twice as long to get through as Vurt.

    Automated Alice - Basically a re-telliing (or as the author, Jeff Noon, states, "a trequel" to Alice in Wonderland and Alice Through The Looking Glass). Not bad, but not essential.

    I'd highly recommend Vurt and then passing on the next two unless you totally get sucked into Noon's twisted vurtual world of Manchester.

    Also recently read Neverwhere by Neil Gaimen. Excellent "portal fantasy" (i.e. like Alice in Wonderland where the lead protagonist is transported to a new world via a portal) and written in a wonderfully wry British manner. Highly recommended if you dig Douglas Adams, Warren Ellis, Grant Morrison, and, well, Neil Gaimen.

    Just started Glamorama by Bret Easton Ellis. Where American Psycho was all hell-bent in rattling consumerism, this book is all about celebrity and kind of presages the whole reality TV boom and America's continued downward spiraled addiction to celebrity doings. Not sure how it's gonna hold up for 400+ pages, but it's addictive much in the same way that something like Jersey Shore is. Recommended if you've read and enjoyed Ellis' previous work: Less Than Zero; Rules of Attraction (perhaps my favorite of his books); American Psycho.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  14. #114
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    Mar 2007
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    i think i tried reading glamorama at one point but never got more than a 100 pages in, did not like it at all.

  15. #115
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    I just passed the 180 page mark and the book is starting to get interesting. Weird, surreal undertones are starting to permeate through and I'm now hooked and intrigued. We'll see if it ends up being as bugged out as its alluding to (and if it holds up for another 200+ pages).
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  16. #116
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    Oct 2003
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    Seattle
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    Just started a new book recommended by my mom: "Ice Hunter" by Joseph Heywood. This is the first book in his Woods Cop series about Michigan Conservation Officer Grady Service. As some reviews have mentioned these books do for Michigan's U.P. what Tony Hillerman's Leaphorn/Chee series did for Navajo country. I know there are a few Yoopers here who might be interested as well as anyone else interested in hunting, fishing and the outdoors which means a good percentage of Maggots.

    Heywood has written seven books in the series and the eighth installment is due out next month. See: http://www.josephheywood.com/woods.html

    I'm only about 50 pages in, but it seems like good light reading. My mom heard about the books from a high school friend of hers who served in Vietnam with Heywood.

  17. #117
    doughboyshredder Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Edgnar View Post
    Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card, as well as Ender's Shadow, Xenocide, Shadow of the Hegemon, basically the whole Ender series.
    I enjoyed Orson Scott Card until I started to notice how he was subtly putting his religious beliefs (mormonism) in to his stories. It started to sound way too preachy to me. Then I read some of his writings, and I decide he'd never get another penny from me.

  18. #118
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    DBS, I didn't know he was Mormon. He was friends with one of my college professors and came and spoke at one of our classes. He seemed an interesting and intelligent guy. I supposed I can see the religious undertones though. The books are fun reads, and you don't have to accept everything he believes.

  19. #119
    doughboyshredder Guest
    Yeah, I know, but he uses his money to push his views in other forums.

    He's pretty hard core.

  20. #120
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    After it was referenced in The Tiger, I picked up Dersu The Trapper. Another kickass rad read.

    Now I gotta pick up Ice Hunter.

  21. #121
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    If any of you like the Steam Punk genre check out China Mieville's Perdido Street Station and The Scar. Not as big a fan of the tweener book Iron Council but it's not bad.

  22. #122
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    About 101 pages deep into Savages by Don Winslow. Cool PoMo noir thriller about two dope dealing Laguna Beach heshers who take on the Mexican cartels.

    Was intrigued that the author gave a shout out to Oliver Stone...lo and behold: it's scheduled to be released in 2012 as a movie.

    Plan to dig up a copy of Drive next and whip through it before that flick hits.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  23. #123
    jerr's Avatar
    jerr is offline Underwater trapeze artist
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    Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell; it's like 4 stories intertwined in a not very entwined way. Historical-nautical, broke (financially and morally) bi-sexual english composer through to socially aware semi-sci-fi and further out the door combining...things, which you simply won't be able to picture until you've read it.

    I also enjoyed Cats Craddle by Kurt Vonnegut, recently. If you liked that you'll probably enjoy cloud atlas.
    Last edited by jerr; 08-20-2011 at 03:01 AM.
    Nine out of ten Jeremy's prefer a warm jacket to a warm day

  24. #124
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    Knocked out Savages in a day. Good, fast-paced yarn that falls somewhere between the Elmore Leonard and Carl Hiassen schools of PoMo noir, with a dash of George Pelacanos and some serious SoCal ambiance tossed in for good measure. It's about to become a movie, so we'll see if Ollie Stone keeps true or f@#ks it up.

    Didn't get to the bookstore to rummage up a copy of Drive (the book upon which that sick looking new Ryan Gosling film is based) so I started Bone in the Throat, a mafia/food/mystery/noir by none other than Anthony "No Reservations" Bourdain. He, understandably, really captures the nuances of NYC's restaurant/drug/wise guy vibe. The only thing about reading this book is that his sardonic, deadpan voice pings around inside my head while I'm reading. Which isn't a bad thing (it's like an existential audio book), but it's a trip.
    "Man, we killin' elephants in the back yard..."

    http://www.blizzardsportusa.com/

  25. #125
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    Jul 2008
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    Time's Arrow or the Nature of the Offense ... Martin Amis.
    Do I detect a lot of anger flowing around this place? Kind of like a pubescent volatility, some angst, a lot of I'm-sixteen-and-angry-at-my-father syndrome?

    fuck that noise.

    gmen.

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