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  1. #1
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    Replying to a rejection email, WWMD?

    I am currently employed, but have been pretty aggressively job hunting for the past couple months. Recently I found a job ad that wasn't in my job field, but on a whim applied because the pay was excellent and didn't sound like too difficult of a position. Someone called me within an hour of sending my resume and cover letter. We had a good chat. He said he was mainly calling me back because I was from Vermont, and he was originally from VT as well. He requested I do a little more in depth writeup of my experience (even told me to make it up if I had to) so he could pass it on to the team and I should be all set. Got a call a few days later, pretty much said I had the job, though not 100% yet, wanted me to come in for an interview, which he called a "mere formality" before I could begin. Everything sounded groovy, I thought I was on my way to making more money than I'd ever made in my life.

    Then today I get an email from the guy saying he was sorry but despite his endorsement, the powers that be rejected my application, but didn't give a reason. Would it be in poor taste to send a reply asking what happened? Should I just say thank you for the opportunity and leave it at that? I'm kind of pissed the guy lead me to believe I had the job, and then *poof* it's gone.

    Also, I'm freshly out of college and sort of new to the whole "real world" job thing. Is this sort of thing a common occurrence?

    Padded Room responses:
    Der poopenhausen
    skull fuck his sister/wife/mom and post a TR
    STFU Jong
    Sweet Blog
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeStrummer
    The universe that is a vehicle is a funny and delicate thing. I fucked my wife in the back seat of our Saab in the parking lot before a Social D / Superchunk show at Red Rocks. After that the radio never worked again.

  2. #2
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    Life happens....thanks for the opportunity and move on
    ROLL TIDE ROLL

  3. #3
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    After careful consideration, I regret to inform you that I am unable to accept your rejection at this time.

    This year I have been particularly fortunate in receiving an unusually large number of rejection letters. With such a varied and promising field of employment, it is impossible for me to accept all refusals.

    Despite your outstanding record and previous experience in rejecting applicants, I find that your rejection does not meet my current career needs. Consequently, I will begin employment as a ______ in your department next month. I look forward to seeing you then.

    Best of luck in rejecting future applicants.
    56798fffffffffffffff9
    ::.:..::::.::.:.::..::.

  4. #4
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    send them a picture of your junk but contort your balls/sack in such a way so that they look at it for a while before figuring out that its a picture of your junk. Follow that up with a call politely informing them that they are a fag.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ccard257 View Post
    send them a picture of your junk but contort your balls/sack in such a way so that they look at it for a while before figuring out that its a picture of your junk. Follow that up with a call politely informing them that they are a fag.
    This is the only correct course of action.
    The whole human race is de evolving; it is due to birth control, smart people use birth control, and stupid people keep pooping out more stupid babies.

  6. #6
    Hugh Conway Guest
    Ask if a handjob would change his opinion.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crock View Post
    I am currently employed, but have been pretty aggressively job hunting for the past couple months. Recently I found a job ad that wasn't in my job field, but on a whim applied because the pay was excellent and didn't sound like too difficult of a position. Someone called me within an hour of sending my resume and cover letter. We had a good chat. He said he was mainly calling me back because I was from Vermont, and he was originally from VT as well. He requested I do a little more in depth writeup of my experience (even told me to make it up if I had to) so he could pass it on to the team and I should be all set. Got a call a few days later, pretty much said I had the job, though not 100% yet, wanted me to come in for an interview, which he called a "mere formality" before I could begin. Everything sounded groovy, I thought I was on my way to making more money than I'd ever made in my life.

    Then today I get an email from the guy saying he was sorry but despite his endorsement, the powers that be rejected my application, but didn't give a reason. Would it be in poor taste to send a reply asking what happened? Should I just say thank you for the opportunity and leave it at that? I'm kind of pissed the guy lead me to believe I had the job, and then *poof* it's gone.

    Also, I'm freshly out of college and sort of new to the whole "real world" job thing. Is this sort of thing a common occurrence?

    Padded Room responses:
    Der poopenhausen
    skull fuck his sister/wife/mom and post a TR
    STFU Jong
    Sweet Blog
    It would not be in poor taste, and maybe they want to see if you have balls.

    Besides, tell them you liked the vibe and maybe something else might come up with them.

    Also, try to talk to someone other than the VT dude. Sounds like he got fucked in the ass over this.

  8. #8
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    a) you don't have the job till you sign papers- lesson learned

    b) why would you thank him for the opportunity? The guy is a poor manager / HR for implying you were hired before his boss made the decision. ask the questions you want the answers to and leave it at that. The VT thing should have been your first clue that the guy isn't the best at hiring.

    c) of-fucking-course you email back asking why you were not hired. at worse they tell you that they hired someone more qualified. at best he takes the time to explain what mistakes you made that led them to not employ you. either way you win: confidence re-gained; or you learn from your mistakes... probably both.

    d) remember- it's business. not personal.

  9. #9
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    After careful consideration, I regret to inform you that I am unable to accept your rejection at this time.

    This year I have been particularly fortunate in receiving an unusually large number of rejection letters. With such a varied and promising field of employment, it is impossible for me to accept all refusals.

    Despite your outstanding record and previous experience in rejecting applicants, I find that your rejection does not meet my current career needs. Consequently, I will begin employment as a ______ in your department next month. I look forward to seeing you then.

    Best of luck in rejecting future applicants.
    Thank you for this, I might try using it for women.

  10. #10
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    Just ask for some constructive criticism as part of the learning process. Whatever you do be cool to/about the guy who was on your side in the first place. He stuck his neck out for you and may be getting reamed for it for all you know.
    No Roger, No Rerun, No Rent

  11. #11
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    Certainly send a "thank you email". Asking for advice on why your application was rejected could be good. If you can send a thank you to the higher ups do that too.

    I once interviewed for a job, got rejected because (I was told) someone else was hired, then I saw the job listed in the paper again. Turns out, the person they offered the job to turned it down, and I guess they didn't want me so they listed it again. Well, I applied again, and in my cover letter I acknowledged that they had obviously rejected me once, but I still thought I was the guy for the job. They gave me another interview and ultimately ended up hiring me. I was told that they were impressed with my persistence and my professionalism (thank you letters to everyone, politeness, etc). So my advice to you is to keep at it.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danno View Post
    Certainly send a "thank you email". Asking for advice on why your application was rejected could be good. If you can send a thank you to the higher ups do that too.

    I once interviewed for a job, got rejected because (I was told) someone else was hired, then I saw the job listed in the paper again. Turns out, the person they offered the job to turned it down, and I guess they didn't want me so they listed it again. Well, I applied again, and in my cover letter I acknowledged that they had obviously rejected me once, but I still thought I was the guy for the job. They gave me another interview and ultimately ended up hiring me. I was told that they were impressed with my persistence and my professionalism (thank you letters to everyone, politeness, etc). So my advice to you is to keep at it.
    I like the 2nd part of this- nice work Man.
    No Roger, No Rerun, No Rent

  13. #13
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    Thanks for the advice guys. I sent a short "thanks anyway" type of email. the guy responded back immediately saying he was sorry if I felt that he lead me on at all, but that he had been in my situation several times before and would keep me in mind for the future.

    definitely a learning experience. As the clock winds down toward the end of my contract here, I'm finding it never pays off to get excited about a new job prospect, as that only leads to disappointment. Procrastination has always gotten me by in life, so even though I've been proactive about finding a new gig, I guess I won't be surprised if it manifests itself the night before. It always works out one way or another.
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeStrummer
    The universe that is a vehicle is a funny and delicate thing. I fucked my wife in the back seat of our Saab in the parking lot before a Social D / Superchunk show at Red Rocks. After that the radio never worked again.

  14. #14
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    I happened to have a pretty good job search guidebook on my desk ("Knock em dead"), so I looked up what it suggests in your situation just for future reference -- I realize you've already replied to the guy.

    Cliff notes on the book's strategy:

    - get the guy on the phone
    - thank him for the interview, usual niceness stuff
    - ask "to help my future job search, could you tell me why I wasn't chosen for the position?"
    - listen closely to the response without interrupting
    - Thank him for the information, and show you understand (even if you dont agree) what he said.
    - Then ask to meet with the company again so that you can show you have the skills they require. be positive and confident, ie "Let me meet with you again. I will show you I can [blah blah blah]. What time is best for you?"

    That's what the book suggests. I haven't tried it, but it seems to jive with Danno's story of employers being impressed with professionalism and persistence. It's a pretty decent book with some good advice if you're looking for something to read.

  15. #15
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    depends on the field, overly persistent might play well in some (sales?) and not in others. Personally, my feeling as a hiring manager is don't annoy me. "Thanks for the time, please keep me in mind for future openings."

  16. #16
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    That knock em dead strategy will get you knocked dead into the circular file. Its like the salesman that gets the door slammed in his face....don't push people at the wrong point in the process.

  17. #17
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    Maybe the powers that be figured out you didn't have enough experience? They're maybe not as dumb as VT. guy thinks?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crock View Post
    Thanks for the advice guys. I sent a short "thanks anyway" type of email. the guy responded back immediately saying he was sorry if I felt that he lead me on at all, but that he had been in my situation several times before and would keep me in mind for the future.

    definitely a learning experience. As the clock winds down toward the end of my contract here, I'm finding it never pays off to get excited about a new job prospect, as that only leads to disappointment. Procrastination has always gotten me by in life, so even though I've been proactive about finding a new gig, I guess I won't be surprised if it manifests itself the night before. It always works out one way or another.
    Next time don't contact them via email. I was once rejected for a job, so I called and asked why I was not chosen, as I felt that I was an excellent fit. We discussed what she saw as weaknesses and I addressed them; I was hired 2 days later.

    It is always better to talk to someone over the phone or face-to-face. It is much harder for them to dismiss you without a second thought.

    Also, as this hiring decision clearly was not in that guy's hands, you should not have reached out to him after you were rejected. Always talk to the person that has the authority to hire you.

    Good luck.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crock View Post
    He requested I do a little more in depth writeup of my experience (even told me to make it up if I had to) so he could pass it on to the team and I should be all set.
    This should have tipped you off...a recruiter or whatever telling you to make shit up...wtf? Sounds to me like he was trying to fill the position for a piece of the bonus pool. Take it as a learning experience.

  20. #20
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    ^^^That was the red flag I saw as well. Still, always follow up on job interviews, et cetera. Make sure the company knows you are really interested, not just applying to anything available.

    More then one hire has turned out to be a bad choice, so the next in line my still get the job.

    If you get the job, and you have signed an employment contract, set up a meeting with the recruiter and kick him in the balls. Actually, do this even if you don't get the job.

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  21. #21
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    Thread hijack alert.

    So, I am looking for jobs as well. Received a rejection email today with this in it. What does the collective think? BS? Will they actually keep my CV?

    Your resume was reviewed by our agency hiring board. Although we were
    unable to match your qualifications against currently available
    positions, your background and qualifications continue to be of interest
    to us.



    Your application will be retained in our resume database for one year in
    the event of an appropriate requirement for your background and skills.
    Flying the Bluehouse colors in Western Canada! Let me know if you want some rad skis!!

    "He is god of snow; the one called Ullr. Son of Sif, step son of Thor. He is so fierce a bowman and ski-runner that none may contend! He is quite beautiful to look upon and has all the characteristics of a warrior. It is wise to invoke the name of Ullr in duels!"

    -The Gylfaginning

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gripen View Post
    Thread hijack alert.

    So, I am looking for jobs as well. Received a rejection email today with this in it. What does the collective think? BS? Will they actually keep my CV?
    That is pretty standard. Not sure why it matters if it is BS or not. If they advertise another job (or you hear about it somehow), you will still apply, right? So whether they keep your CV on file is irrelevant.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin

  23. #23
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    I've been contacted by a big company asking for me to interview for a new position over a year after I applied for a different position, so at least some keep your resume.

    But yeah, not sure how that would effect your plan of attack one way or the other...

  24. #24
    Hugh Conway Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by davep View Post
    I've been contacted by a big company asking for me to interview for a new position over a year after I applied for a different position, so at least some keep your resume.
    Did the hiring manager keep you in mind, or did HR? I've had several hiring managers keep me in mind and re-interview (and offer). HR doesn't. I'm not even sure the big defense firms ever look at their database other than to say "no, we didn't like him because his resume didn't have the right search buzzwords" Perhaps counter-intuitive but the big, process driven defense firm recruiting efforts seem to be even more personality driven than small firms (but the beancounters have to sign off in the end)

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Conway View Post
    Did the hiring manager keep you in mind, or did HR? I've had several hiring managers keep me in mind and re-interview (and offer). HR doesn't. I'm not even sure the big defense firms ever look at their database other than to say "no, we didn't like him because his resume didn't have the right search buzzwords" Perhaps counter-intuitive but the big, process driven defense firm recruiting efforts seem to be even more personality driven than small firms (but the beancounters have to sign off in the end)
    dunno... I never got an interview for the first position so I doubt the hiring manager would be aware of me. Maybe somebody actually browsed through their massive online resume database when a new position opened.

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