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  1. #176
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    LMMFAO at 1:19!!!!!!!!!!
    ...And the greatest ice must crumble when it's flower's time to grow.

  2. #177
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    This thread makes steelhead fishing suck. Time to get drunk and pretend I'm in the tropics.

  3. #178
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    Another GT Video



    #1 GT was massive and instead of burning the reel he swam AT ME??? All the others have just tore ass away.
    #2 GT was 10 feet off the beach and I just could not get him in, The hook was fine I just never got a great set.
    #3 GT attacked the fly as son as it hit the water, and missed as many do, then circled back and hammered it.



    Maybe some boners next???

    I know its pretty crappy, I am starting to play more with the video maker and hopefully the next one will be better. I still have tons of footage to put together.
    A woman reported to police at 6:30 p.m. that she was being "smart-mouthed."

  4. #179
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    WILL YOU GET A GODDAM CAMERAMAN ALREADY!?!!?!!! So much good action there, but so hard to tell. THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU though for putting it all together...favorite post in awhile!!
    ...And the greatest ice must crumble when it's flower's time to grow.

  5. #180
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    Epping, NH
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    500
    well done

  6. #181
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    Got an early call back to work, and plane tickets just came in. New pics by next week.

    Does anyone have any experience tagging bonefish? I just shot an email to the Tarpon and Bonefish trust to see if they might be interested?
    A woman reported to police at 6:30 p.m. that she was being "smart-mouthed."

  7. #182
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    Time to resume excessive drinking then. Keep the photos coming, this is a fucking awesome TR!
    Thanks for posting!

  8. #183
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    Aug 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by mushmouth View Post
    LMMFAO at 1:19!!!!!!!!!!
    Yeah, I saw that loop over the butt at about 1:10, and thought, uh-oh... Nice yell, though.
    #3 GT in video 2 was awesome the way he flew outta the water right after the take. He was pissed. I think #1 GT was coming at you and you never got a good strip set into him. Maybe you need to do a little Tarpon set on them after the turn. Some guys like circle hooks too, but it's hard to not set the hook with those, as it's instinctual with me now. Great stuff. I kinda like the raw-ness of it all.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  9. #184
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    Sorry


    Sorry it's been so long. I hope I have not upset anyone. My schedule is much better now and I should do much better than 1 in 4 days fishing, hopefully back to my 1 day in 2 routine.



    The ride out to my new home for the next 4 months.


    It amazes me how much trash there is on the outer beaches. Time for a beach cleanup party. This pic will not upload straight!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!????


    Not quite fishing time......another few minutes for the sun.


    First bone back on the flats


    First bone for this guy...put a shirt on Blake, you are not Hawaiian.


    Found some cover under a tree while the shower passes


    Free washdown


    Bluefin trevalley are fun on an 8wt. and still pull for a bit on the 12. The big ones wont hit the charlies all the time but will hit the same mushy's as the GT's.
    more upload issues...go figure I am paying 20 bucks for 4 hours of slow ass internet


    Bluefin headshot


    We still fish when we go out to sea for a few days each month.


    Still looking for that first big GT. I saw one the size of a love seat yesterday inside the lagoon but he was gone before i could gear up. Headed out today(4th of July) for an offshore trip and maybe I will get a shot at a small yellowfin on the 12wt. I promise more pics soon. I have been dragging all sorts of folks(cameramen) out with me and the GoPro 4 just arrived so video will be much better in the future. Happy 4th of July
    A woman reported to police at 6:30 p.m. that she was being "smart-mouthed."

  10. #185
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    Turtle sex and bonefish virgins


    It is mating season for these. On a walk back to the bikes a couple days ago we say 5 nest locations.


    More porn angles.


    A decent bone in the area of all the love making.


    I was about to ride a few miles down the road to hit another flat...then I decided fish where I already was.


    directions are good


    mmmmmmmm........what is my level of emergency????


    I don't want these guys getting curious to what I am up to.


    I guess i will hang and wait for a taxi......for 45 minutes. At least the view was nice. if only the wind and tide we right and the spot right there wasn't filled with fish that have sharp teeth and fins.


    This cadet just arrived form Juneau AK. Welcome, and congrats on your first bonefish.


    Mine is bigger


    That's a nice 2nd bonefish.


    one for me


    warm up for saturday?




    The craziest place on the island(random I know) after dark....on weekends...while I am sleeping.
    Palm trees growing in 17 foot Whalers? What a waste.
    A woman reported to police at 6:30 p.m. that she was being "smart-mouthed."

  11. #186
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    Loving it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    ...And the greatest ice must crumble when it's flower's time to grow.

  12. #187
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    other things to do


    so you guys want to feed me a couple shots, that I don't have to pay for, and then you wind me up and let go.....why?


    OK, GO!


    lifeboat ops. We are not pirates , so don't shoot us.


    fishing platform rear view


    deck level view, complete with my angry tuna face


    flats were epic


    I an working on a screen cap of my largest bone ever landed. Jumped out of my hands and spit the hook. He was very talented.
    A woman reported to police at 6:30 p.m. that she was being "smart-mouthed."

  13. #188
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    Is there a way I can hide some of this thread, without deleting it? "redacted" maybe???
    A woman reported to police at 6:30 p.m. that she was being "smart-mouthed."

  14. #189
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    ^^^edit your own posts?

  15. #190
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    I want to be standing in that last picture
    Samuel L. Jackson as Jules Winnfield: Oh, I'm sorry. Did I break your concentration?

  16. #191
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    A woman reported to police at 6:30 p.m. that she was being "smart-mouthed."

  17. #192
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    smallies on the fly

    Got out on the river for the first time in a while, picked up two nice sized smallies in a little hole with a #2 clouser. good times.

  18. #193
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    My world record weight GT (released) on 12 lb tippet....guess where

  19. #194
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    Overview
    Diego Garcia is perhaps the finest accessible tropical fly-fishing location anywhere in the world. In fact, tourists pay tens of thousands
    of dollars to take fishing excursions to the Seychelles for the same opportunities available in Diego. As the southernmost atoll in the
    Chagos Ridge, Diego Garcia is home to a rich and largely untouched marine environment providing a diverse fishery, beautiful natural
    scenery, and ample opportunity for anglers of all skill levels. It is unquestionably one of the finest fishing locations in the entire world
    and very few people will ever have the opportunity to experience it firsthand.
    Diego Garcia is part of the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT) that exercises jurisdiction over the fishery. Fishing using conventional
    methods and fly fishing is legal on the ocean side of the US-operating area and on the lagoon side south of port operations to the
    incinerator. Most fishing is accessible by wading which is permitted up to knee deep; however, there are some opportunities around
    rock structures and from other shore areas. Use of wire leaders and the taking of shark species is prohibited and enforced by
    significant penalties including large fines and confinement.
    The lagoon-side flats largely consist of white sand deposits. Wading here is easy; however, there are large populations of stingrays.
    The ocean-side flats consist of old coral and have much more diversity of structure and aquatic life. Wading can be challenging and
    large swells can make the ocean side nearly unfishable on occasion; however, this side has more accessible area during various tide
    stages. During the winter (May-October), prevailing winds blow from the southeast making the ocean side normally more favorable.
    During the summer, the winds come from the northwest making the lagoon side more favorable. The best tides for the flats occur
    during the first 1/3-1/2 of the spring tides which range about 5 feet. Neap tides can allow for decent fishing as well but water levels are
    usually quite high limiting accessible areas. While very little live coral remains on the wading flats, there are some areas where this
    A woman reported to police at 6:30 p.m. that she was being "smart-mouthed."

  20. #195
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    natural resource is found and should be avoided for the health of the ecosystem.
    Recommended Equipment
    The list of recommended equipment is pretty straight forward for Diego. The most versatile rod is a fast-action 8 weight that can handle
    almost all of the flats species, although rods as light as 6 and 7 weights or as heavy as 9 and 10 weights can be used successfully. For
    opportunities at larger trigger fish, bluefin trevally, and the “baby” Giant Trevallies (GTs), a 10 weight can be useful. Giant trevally,
    some exceeding 30 pounds, are an occasional target. An 11 or 12 weight rod is ideal for these bruisers. Floating lines handle the bulk
    of the work, although there are limited applications for sinking lines from boats and piers. I recommend “up-lining” a size as most shots
    are within 50 feet and the wind can be fierce at times (e.g. put an 8 wt line on a 7wt rod). A back-up line or two is recommended due to
    large amount of coral. Standard salt-water, disk drag reels holding 200+ yards of backing are appropriate. Fast action rods are
    preferred due to frequent high winds. Regardless, there is no place for your trout rod here… leave it at home!
    Several monofilament 9’ x 12-20# leaders will cover the vast majority of your needs (I like 16# as an all-round choice). Bring additional
    spools of 12, 20, 40, and 60# mono or fluorocarbon tippet to cover the bases. For flies, an assortment of medium-weighted bonefish
    and permit flies in #1-4 will handle most of the work. A few poppers and baitfish patterns in #1-3/0 will suffice. Successful flies tend to
    be slightly heavier here than in the Caribbean. Specific gear, fly and leader information is provided in the species-specific
    recommendations below.
    In addition, the standard flats sneakers/wading boots, sun protective clothing, polarized sun-glasses, a wide brimmed hat, and small
    hydration/gear pack are essential.
    Specific Species
    Bonefish
    Ample opportunity exists for small to medium sized bonefish on both the inner and outer flats. It is not unusual to spot multiple 20+ fish
    schools during a tide. Normally, there is a realistic shot at 2-5 very large adults and often more. There are potential world record-sized
    fish occasionally on these flats! Bonefish are notoriously difficult to spot and it takes time to learn to “see” the fish. Most people find it
    easier to spot them on sand flats than the coral flats. Often, you can find them feeding along the edges of parrotfish and triggerfish
    schools which are easy to spot. They rarely tail in Diego, but when they do, it is a marvelous sight.
    Rod: 6-8 weight
    Line: WF-Floating
    Leader: 9-10’, 12-16# mono or fluorocarbon (less than 12# is unnecessary and will result in coral breakoffs)
    Flies: Larger and more heavily weighted bonefish flies (#2-4) are generally required due to the water depth on the flats (1-3 feet) and
    wave/swell action although a selection of lighter bead chain patterns is recommended in the shallow and protected backbays. Oddly,
    chartreuse flies perform very well on the outer flat. Tan and pink are top performers on the lagoon size.
    Indo-Pacific Permit
    The Indo-Pacific permit is just a difficult to find and hook as their American counterparts; however, the species is smaller allowing for
    smaller flies and rods. They are occasionally seen in pairs or small schools crossing structure on the flats. Landing one of these finicky
    and hard fighters is a justifiable accomplishment.
    Rod: 7-9 weight
    Line: WF-Floating
    Leader: 9-10’, 12-16# mono or fluorocarbon (same as bonefish)
    Flies: They seem to take natural colored, heavily weighted bonefish flies in the #2-4 range.
    Bluefin Trevally
    There are several jack-related species on the flats. Arguably, one of the most beautiful is the bluefin trevally. They are fast moving fish
    that make violent runs across the flat. You will often see the “blue streak” and a wake across the flat. Casts must be made accurately
    in front of the fish in a timely manner to get their attention before they pass by. Bluefin seem to favor fast moving flies.
    Rod: 8-10 weight
    Line: WF-Floating
    Leader: 9-10’, 12-16# mono or fluorocarbon (same as bonefish); up to 20-25# for the really large fish.
    Flies: Bonefish flies are often effective on bluefin, and in fact, many are caught while bonefishing. The more traditional method is to
    target them with small baitfish imitations in the #2-1/0 size.
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  21. #196
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    Giant Trevally (GT)
    This is the holy grail of fly rodders in Diego Garcia. GTs generally patrol around the outside edges of a flat and enter as the tide rises to
    attack prey. They range in size from 10 to 80 pounds with 30 being a good average number. These are massively powerful fish.
    Similar to bluefin, they are on the flat to hunt and usually move quickly and with great sense of purpose. Accurate casts and a mediumfast
    retrieve of a large baitfish fly will result in hookups… landings are more difficult!
    Rod: 10-12 weight
    Line: WF-Floating
    Leader: 9-10’, 20-25# class tippet, 12” 40-60# shock tippet
    Flies: Large baitfish and popper patters (2/0-6/0)
    Triggerfish
    Triggerfish are abundant in Diego and provide a rare treat for a lucky fly angler. They are easiest to fish for during the first 1/3 of a flood
    tide where they will congregate along coral structure in large schools. Tailing fish are actively feeding and provide the most willing
    target. Well presented, small crab flies on heavy hooks in front of a tailing fish can result in a hook up. The best advice is to cast in
    front of the fish and then set the hook hard when the fish “tips” down near the fly. The logic is that a hard set is required to set the hook
    in the bony mouth and you are unlikely to feel the soft take. When caught, the fish will make a blistering run to coral structure requiring
    immediate pressure to prevent a break-off. These are very difficult fish to both fool and land. Trigger fish have small mouths but
    massive teeth capable of causing serious damage… they can be very dangerous to handle.
    Rod: 8-10 weight
    Line: WF-Floating
    Leader: 9-10’, 20-25# class tippet, 12” 30# shock tippet
    Flies: Small, heavily weighted crab patterns (less than the size of a dime) in orange and black are traditionally successful. They should
    be tied on extra heavy #1 live bait hooks to prevent the fish from cutting through the hook (yes, they can do that).
    Where to Fish
    There are lots of places worth exploring; however, here’s a list of well-established locations that provide ample opportunity:
     Cannon Point (ocean side). Excellent on incoming tide for triggerfish and the occasional trevally or bonefish.
     Rock Pier (Airfield Sewage Outfall, ocean side). Good on occasion for bonefish. Heavy fishing pressure, it can get crowded
    with bait fishermen on weekends or nice days. Warning, do not wade here due to bait fishermen.
     Incinerator (ocean side). Excellent for all kinds of fish. Park or bike to the incinerator and park in the secondary gate entry
    area next to the call box station (don’t block the gate). There is an opening across the street to the flat. Generally fishable 1-3
    hours after the low tide.
     PACAF Munitions (ocean side). Park in the paved parking area and cross the street. Similar to Incinerator, although here the
    flat generally rises as you travel south allowing for more fishing time during a spring tide should you be willing to walk for a
    while home.
     Thunder Cove. The flat behind the recreation pavilion is an excellent sand flat for bonefish with a good population of permit
    and trevally. This site is best around dead low tide. Warning: there are a lot of stingrays. Wade carefully! Additionally, there
    is opportunity on the old piers for cruising trevally during tide shifts if access is available (sometimes closed for safety). An
    intermediate or sinking line is useful on the piers. Stay away from the nice drainage area and flat to the south… it is loaded
    with stingrays… some sand-colored!
     GEODDS. Located on the Southeast portion of the US area, it has a different bottom composition consisting of lighter colored
    coral flats that can be fished successfully in inclement weather and at a wide range of low tide conditions. Fish here are
    numerous and unpressured. Park near the dumpster at the entrance to GEODDS and walk across the road to the flat. The
    largest permit by far I have ever seen was taken here along the beach at mid-tide.
    Helpful Fly-Casting Tips (Updated February 2016)
    Remember that fly casting is all about having the rod cast the line. Skill is about efficiently loading (bending) the rod against the
    line’s momentum and then allowing it to unload in the direction of the cast. Your enemy here is anything that prevents the rod from
    loading. Typically, controlling slack and not rushing the casts will be your biggest challenges as a beginner. Here are some helpful
    tips that are common errors:
     Start with enough line to load the rod. You should have at least 15 feet of fly line outside the tip in order to load the rod;
    working with less will prevent the rod from casting the line effectively. You will recognize this fault by quick “whipping” of the
    rod to get the cast started.
     Remove the slack before you cast. Start with a roll cast to remove most of the slack from the line before attempting a
    backcast. It is extremely difficult to remove slack during a cast. You will recognize this fault in a deep and long backcast with
    little power (resulting from starting the power stroke after all the slack is removed).
     Accelerate to a stop. Remember to start slow and accelerate to a stop on both the forward and backcast. Think of throwing a
    rock over your shoulder (backcast) or dart (forward cast). A common error is moving the rod at the same speed throughout
    the cast. When this happens, the rod cannot load. You will recognize this fault from large, open loops and little energy. This
    is especially common on a forward cast.
     Manage your line. Only pull as much line off the reel as you can comfortably cast. Keep the rest of the line out of your feet
    and clear of the reel handle. Too much line doesn’t necessarily change your cast, but it does lead to problems after a good
    cast is made and has the tendency to make you “think” you can cast farther than you are ready.
     Do not follow through. Come to an abrupt and complete stop on both the forward and backward cast. This is one of the few
    sports where following through is bad. You will recognize this fault from large open loops and little energy as well as the fly
    smacking or heading downward toward the water.
     Keep your wrist as straight as possible. Bending the wrist slows the “stop” and opens up the loop both causing a loss of
    energy. A trick is to wear a long sleeved shirt and tuck the rod butt into the wrist cuff. You will recognize this fault from large
    open loops.
     Do not overpower your cast. Fly casting should be easy work… one of the world’s best casters is over 80 years old. Let the
    rod work… if your timing and form is good, it will work. If you find yourself working too hard, you have problems in your cast.
    A common error is “heaving” the line on the final forward cast… it never helps. This problem also contributes to the formation
    of “wind knots” in your leader/tippet. You will recognize this fault by having a “wavy” loop, knots in your tippet/leader, and
    feeling “worn out” while casting.
     Make two separate casts. The fly cast is two distinct and separate casts: forward and backward. Do not put them together
    into one motion. A trick is to count “2 Mississippi’s” between casts. This can be an expensive fault. You will recognize it by
    constant motion of the rod (no clear stops) and the “$5 snap” where your fly is whipped by an early forward or backward casts
    causing the tippet to break and fly to be lost.
     Keep your hands together through the casting stroke. A common error is to cast while the line hand “dangles” at your side.
    This actually puts slack into your casts during the important power stroke. You will recognize this fault by open, wide loops
    and longer than usual casting strokes.
     Keep the rod tip low after the cast. Lower your rod tip to the water after your final forward cast to remove slack and prevent
    the wind from moving the line. You will recognize this from a longer than normal back cast and line blowing in piles on the
    water.
    A woman reported to police at 6:30 p.m. that she was being "smart-mouthed."

  22. #197
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     Release line only at the end of the power stroke. Many casters try to “give line” too early in the stroke. When this happens,
    the rod cannot fully load (decreasing energy) and has no ability to carry the fly line or the additional length. The line should be
    released when sufficient momentum is “pulling” against the line hand. You will learn to “feel” the right time. This fault is
    recognized in the weak delivery of a cast, often resulting in a big pile of line.
     When you see a fish, don’t get excited (but you will anyway). Try not to. Take your time and deliver a good cast. You will
    recognize this fault by frustration.
     As soon as you can cast 45-60 feet, learn to double haul. This is an advanced cast, but it isn’t that hard to master. A double
    haul will make casting in the wind and with heavy flies much easier. It requires that your fundamentals be good in order to be
    effective, so work on the other tips first.
    My final word of advice is that some people cast well right off the bat and others take a lifetime. I am an adequate caster… but it
    has taken me years to get to “adequate”. There is no substitute to experience, so keep working at it and you will get better. If you
    find yourself getting frustrated, just take a break and seek an experienced friend to help if you have one. In the absolute worst
    case, almost anyone (including first day beginners) can cast 30 feet. 90% of the fish I’ve ever caught on the fly have been within
    that range.
    Helpful Fly-Fishing Tips (updated February 2016)
    Lines, Leaders and Tippets
     Consider “overlining” the rod by one flyine weight (e.g. a 9wt line on an 8wt rod). Rods are generally designed to load for a 60 foot cast (more weight
    outside the tip). Since most of our fish are caught in the 30 foot range, you will probably find it easier to cast a heavier line. You will sacrifice distance
    but only at the most extreme distances (>60 feet). You probably can’t see fish that far away anyway.
     Choosing a flyline. Try to find flylines that have built-in loops as they are easier to rig. Also, don’t buy-into marketing type. Any type of weight forward
    taper will work. “Saltwater”, “Redfish”, “Bonefish”, even “Trout”. I’m sure there are lots of opinions, but mine is that color doesn’t really matter. Get one
    you like (I recommend a bright color for beginners so you can see it). The fish really only sees a shadow of your line regardless of color… and if he
    sees the shadow, he will spook 90% of the time anyway. If the flyline doesn’t have a built in loop, another good option is to affix a ~9” 40 or 50# mono
    section with a perfection loop. Attach it with a nail knot to the end of the flyline. While not necessary, it can add durability to coat the nail knot with a
    pliable waterproof glue.
     A 9’ leader is a good standard for floating lines. A shorter leader should be considered when the wind is strong, the water is stained, or when using
    exceptionally heavy flies; 7 feet can be considered a reasonable minimum. A longer leader should be considered in very skinny water, when fish are
    skittish, or when conditions are unusually calm; 12 feet can be considered a reasonable maximum.
     A sample hand tied leader formula (9’): 5’ of 40# mono -> 1’ of 30# mono -> 1’ of 20# mono -> 2’ class tippet
     Always use a class tippet of 25# or less when fishing for large game (over 40# fish). This will help prevent loss of your fly line, damage to rods, or
    injury.
     Recommended knots: Line to leader-Perfection loop (loop to loop), leader sections-Blood knot (double uni and surgeon’s knots are alternates), Leader
    to tippet-Surgeon’s knot. Blood knots are used in leaders because they draw up smaller than most alternatives. All of these are easy to “Google”.
     “Trout” tippets are the same basic material as “saltwater” tippets; however, they are sized differently. For comparison this is a pretty good
    approximation (every manufacturer and material is different), 3X ~ 8#, 2X ~ 10#, 1X ~ 12#, and 0X ~ 15#. Don’t hesitate to use “freshwater”
    leaders/tippets. Some of the saltwater tippets are made with a stiffer material or harder surface treatment; this can help but isn’t essential.
    General advice for bonefish flies
    The most important factors are color/flash, size, weight and style. Here are some general thoughts:
     Start with weight. The fly should sink at the rate you want. As a general rule, the deeper the water on a flat, the heavier the fly should be. However,
    there are exceptions such as trigger fish where you want the fly to immediately sink to the bottom (use a heavier fly). In surf conditions, it generally
    helps to have a heavier fly to reduce the amount of wave action. In skinny water, weightless or lightly weighted flies are appropriate. You want to give
    the fish a reasonable chance to see the fly before it hits the bottom but not an unnatural amount of time. Use very light flies (unweighted or bead chain)
    when fishing for tailing fish in very shallow water to avoid spooking them.
     Size is an important factor. Fish key in on certain prey. The size of the fly should mimic the bait. Most shrimp, worms and small fish should be in the
    #2-6 range (#4 most common). Most crabs should be in the #2-#1 size. Consider decreasing a size if the fish turn away from a fly or increasing if you
    are looking for larger fish.
     Color is probably least important. The conventional wisdom is to use natural colored flies mimicking the general flat color (e.g. tans and pinks in sand
    and browns and greens in coral). Also, it is said that light colored flies with minimal flash work best on clear days and bright, flashy ones are the choice
    for cloudy days. However, there are many people who are successful with bright “attractor” patterns. If you ask 10 people, they will probably give you
    10 opinions. Several of us have found that gaudy chartreuse flies work very well on the ocean-side flats here.
     The style of fly should be chosen based on prey (shrimp, crab, fish, etc), conditions (castability, sink rate), movement (jigging, sliding, or crawling
    action), and weedlessness (hook up, weed guards, etc).
     Never, ever touch a fly with sunscreen on your hands. The smell will turn off most fish and you will never clean it.
    Hooking and Landing Fish
     Saltwater fish have hard mouths. Using the “trout set” or lifting the rod will not put enough force on the hook and will almost always result in a lost fish.
    The proper method is the “strip-strike” where you hook the fish by stripping the line into the fish’s jaw. Never lift the rod until the fish is well hooked.
     Once hooked, place a slight bend in the rod to absorb shock and slack. When a fish runs away, you should almost point the rod straight at the fish to
    put maximum drag against them. If a fish runs side to side, angle the rod to pull against their direction of travel. If a fish runs directly toward you, it is
    best to put the rod tip in the water to avoid slack line getting wrapped around the tip top (this will break the fly rod). It is OK to strip excess line if you
    can’t keep up on the reel.
     Only give the fish line if they earn it. If a fish can be played in your hands and you have excess line, you can wrap it up using the rod hand by spinning
    the reel. Once a fish is on the reel, you should try to keep them there.
     If the fish is running against the drag, there is no reason to try to stop it. Lower your angle and wait for the fish to stop. Once the run is over,
    immediately start taking back line.
     As more bend is put in the rod, the effort the angler expends increases while the effort he fish pulls against decreases, so try to minimize the bend.
     The number one way a fly rod is broken (outside of car doors) is by “high sticking”. Remember, you have a 9’ rod. When the fish is near you, if you try
    to pull the fish close with the rod a tight angle will form near the tip resulting in a shattered rod. The best way to land a fish on a fly rod, regardless of
    size, is to have a friend land it for you. If your partner is not available, then hold the rod far out in the rod hand, angle in toward your other side, and use
    a far outstretched hand to leader the fish. Once leadered, immediately remove all stress from the fly rod.
     When landing a fish with a partner (recommended), you should guide the fish to the other person. They will grab the leader but should not “wrap” their
    hands around it. Once in the hand, the angler should immediately strip off two lengths of line, raise the rod slightly, and be at the ready for a release.
    Often, saltwater fish have one or two more runs left in them. If they go again and the partner has wrapped their hand, often the leader will break (or an
    injury will occur). If they are ready, they simply release the fish when it tries to run. The angler will be ready to continue the fight.
    A woman reported to police at 6:30 p.m. that she was being "smart-mouthed."

  23. #198
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
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    2,078

    I hope you enjoy

    I have been back a couple weeks and while I was gone a bunch of guys really got after it. The above info is what teh great folks here have put out so new fishermen can get some idea of whats going on here. There are a dozen setups, 7+8wt, that TFO was great about getting out here in support of those Military members who want to learn to fly fish. There is now a fly fishing class that a couple very dedicated folks have setup so people can learn the basics. I am proud to play a very small part in passing on some of what I have picked up here on to others. Now on to some pics.




    A woman reported to police at 6:30 p.m. that she was being "smart-mouthed."

  24. #199
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    ANC / ADQ
    Posts
    2,620
    Holy disclosure #2 those are some seriously informative posts!

    This thread has me seriously considering a tropical fishing adventure, thank you for the mad stoke.
    Last edited by DeathVan; 03-02-2016 at 12:32 PM.

  25. #200
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Undisclosed
    Posts
    2,078
    I a very happy you enjoyed the words. I figured it's not like you can get here anyway unless.......

    Thanks to Mushy as well for continued use of the 12wt. If I can free up a few bucks I am planning on taking up Sage on an offer they gave me a couple months ago...the only problem is I really like this Winston???

    While I was gone the group developed a basic fly fishing class. So far I thing maybe a dozen have been through the 2 classes. There is another one scheduled soon and I know we will have at least 6-7 participating. After a student completes the class they are added to the list of people who may check out a rod for use whenever they choose. There are a dozen TFO setups, 7's and 8's. One more fun activity was the fly tying demonstration we put on the other night. I had thought a couple of us would bring vices but it ended up just being me. Next week we hope to have 2 or 3 of us tying a couple diff patterns.....and tasting beverages. No fishing for me for one more week, I am working days right now. I switch to the "fishing watch" a week from today
    A woman reported to police at 6:30 p.m. that she was being "smart-mouthed."

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