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  1. #1926
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    57
    Reviving this to tell a little bit about my story. I fractured my Tibial Plateau february 23 skiing, along with a full thickness meniscal contusion. It was non-displaced and treatment was non surgical. I injured it on a bad landing, felt a crunch or 2 pops (which I though was my acl), but did not feel immediate pain. Walking up to get my skis something felt very wrong and assumed ligament damage immediately. I skied down to the base area after putting my skis on and by the time I got to the bottom I could barely move my leg. Limped my way to the clinic with assistance from a friend and some ski poles and was diagnosed after xray with the TPF and presumed ACL, MCL, Menisucs. My ortho later had similar fears after doing all the stability tests with my knee and said that he was positive I damaged my MCL and 70% sure I tore my ACL. Surprisingly, the MRI showed all ligaments intact, with the only damage being the TPF and meniscal contusion.

    In the first few days, pain was unbearable and range of motion was almost zero. 8/10 pain for about 36 hours straight... I opted for advil because I'm dumb and tough. After 5 weeks, I had gained about 80% of my ROM and pain was minimal hanging around the house, occasionally reaching a 3-4/10 if I was resting it in one position for too long. At that point I got more xrays and my ortho was satisfied with the progress of my healing, so we moved to 25% weight bearing, increasing to 50% as tolerated. Walking with crutches felt good. Once I got my leg moving, things seemed to progress rapidly, at least for about 2 weeks and then things plateaued a bit.

    A week and a half ago I decided I felt good enough to get out to a concert. I sat the whole show, but at the end of the night my knee was so sore from all the jostling and travelling that I was sure I had bit off more than I could chew and set myself back.

    Last week on 4/20 I had my next ortho follow up and round of xrays. Ortho to my surprise said the fracture was no longer recognizable on the xray and approved me to move to full weight bearing as tolerated. I was told to ease into it and have a crutch (or two) close by in case I needed to back off. I was also allowed to ditch my knee brace. 5 days later and I am once again improving quite quickly. At the end of each day, my injured knee has been a little sore with the increased weight bearing, but each day that I have used it that end of day soreness has diminished. I am still very much walking with a limp, and using the crutches for balance and confidence when I'm out of the house. Today I went properly up and down some stairs while holding tight to the railing to reduce some weight with no pain.

    I've been doing PT all throughout this process which I think has helped immensely. My quad atrophied shockingly quickly in those first 2 weeks where I wasn't able to move it at all. But with PT the atrophy stopped, and now I've even gained some of that quad muscle back. I am having occasional tracking issues with my patella, which my PT does not seem to be concerned about. The problems with tracking seem to be fewer and farther between as I've been progressing and getting stronger, so I trust him on that.

    My Ortho seems to think I will be able to return to light athletic activity in June, and more aggressive athletic activity in July. The snow will be around in august in Tahoe, so I'm in no rush.

    I'll try to give another update in June. I had a hard time trying to find stories about less severe tibial plateau fractures and long term outcomes, so I'm hoping my story will help encourage some folks. It seemed like my knee was beyond f$%&ed when I first did my injury and the lingering pain was shocking and discouraging. It feels good now knowing the progress I've made.
    Last edited by tnorts; 04-25-2023 at 04:47 PM.

  2. #1927
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    a swamp
    Posts
    632
    Well here I am, guess I always knew it was a matter of time before I would join the ranks of the fallen here in Gimp central. Actually I did make a visit 15 yrs ago with a busted up shoulder and ultimately a metal strap screwed to the collarbone. Those were the days.

    Accident occured on Feb. 10. This time it was clear on the mountain I had a bilateral tib/fib fracture. But CT and xrays taken when they got me to Intermountain in Salt Lake City confirmed the worst: Type VI tibial plateau fracture on both legs. I was in a room at ortho trauma ward at Intermountain for four nights, can't speak highly enough of the staff there. On the night of arrival they put on external fixations. Wife and son were with me and we made the decision that the best course was for me to somehow fly home to North Carolina particularly since the swelling meant no subsequent surgery could happen until at least two weeks later. Ortho and PT made sure I could make the slider board transitions from bed to chair and really facilitated a seemless discharge for me early Wed. morning. My son posted a detailed account of how we managed the logistics of that flight which would be useful to anyone who finds themselves in that situation. https://www.reddit.com/r/delta/comme...o_broken_legs/

    The accident happened in the Hidden Canyon (valley?) area at Brighton, thru the gate lookers left of Great western. We had already made some great powder runs off great western and mid morning went out the side gate. I dropped into like the third chute, boys went on to the next. Midway as the chute narrowed I stopped, and rather than straight lining started jump turning down, missed one fell forward and was flipping and tomahawking immediately..... a long ragdoll 100-150 yds seemingly forever, I had know idea how violent and helpless a fall like that is, all witnessed by my sons .... Dynafit bindings were not locked but did not release, knew half way my legs were broken. Came to a rest seated with my back facing uphill which was a good thing. My feet felt like they were swimming independently in warm water. Sons were there to keep me from doing anything to make me slide off my perch. We called patrol and while waiting someone who'd previously patrolled stayed with us and gave them better location information, whoever that was thanks for your knowledge and help!!!! Brighton patrol was absolutely great!
    I go into the fall in detail because as far as I know I did not hit any trees or rock bands so I'm amazed my TPs could have been so completely shattered.
    After getting home we had several days to get the house set up and streamlined for wheelchair life.
    First surgery was done last Thurs. Feb. 29, it took 5 1/2 hours. Next one is Tues., its even more complex and will take longer.
    The surgeon spoke to us and said my bones were alarmingly soft which may explain the scale of damage. Iam 61 yrs old and bone density tests last year indicated that I was already into osteoporosis on some of the tested sites. Also, a life time of pretty heavy drinking and the associated poor absorption of vitamins has not been helpful.
    So there we are, pain of the breaks with the external fixations had become quite tolerable. But my first efforts with PT/OT to maneuver my internally fixed leg was absolutely want to vomit pass out excruciating. Can't imagine the level after the second surgery.

    So there it is guys, I confess I have only worked thru a small part of this thread because frankly it is pretty fucking depressing. But I'll keep reading and posting as I progress. I have very good support and would characterize things as generally upbeat. I'm very glad to have the shared experience of all my fellow travellers on this tough path.
    Peace to us all, David

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    you know there ain't no devil,
    there's just God when he's drunk---- Tom Waits

  3. #1928
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    North,NorthEast
    Posts
    3,591
    Oh man, that was painful to read. Good to hear you are in good spirits. You got a long road ahead, keep up the positivity. It does get better

  4. #1929
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    North,NorthEast
    Posts
    3,591
    Oh man, that was painful to read. Good to hear you are in good spirits. You got a long road ahead, keep up the positivity. It does get better

  5. #1930
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Joisey
    Posts
    2,512
    Glad to see you made it home without any complications. As mentioned in the Wasatch thread (and up thread here I believe), I broke my TP (Type II) while on vacation at Alta in 2019. I had surgery at the U of U and flew home a few days later. That flight was rough. I can’t imagine what you went through with both legs broken.

    I can’t tell from your hospital bed photos as to if they are “from home”, but if you haven’t already, I highly recommend renting a hospital bed.

    Keep taking the blood thinners as prescribed and keep an eye out for any changes in color/feeling in your toes. I had a blood clot scare as my toes started “bruising”.

    All the best with the second surgery.

    Do not hesitate to reach out if you have any questions.
    Because rich has nothing to do with money.

  6. #1931
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    2,661
    Damn daviski, I don't have anything to add except to send you good wishes. Did your ligaments come out of that alright? I hope surgery two goes well.

  7. #1932
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    a swamp
    Posts
    632
    I do have a hospital bed and a lot of other things to make things more manageable at home. We had about a weak between flying home and being admitted here too work out logistics. Apparently only one ligament was severely damaged, not one I recognized. I could post the CT scan analysis, it's pretty fucking grim
    you know there ain't no devil,
    there's just God when he's drunk---- Tom Waits

  8. #1933
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SF & the Ho
    Posts
    9,526
    Súper impressive to make that flight work for you. That must have been rough. I assumed two busted legs would mean renting for a long drive. Best of luck w the surgery.

  9. #1934
    Join Date
    Nov 2022
    Location
    The demographic and socio-political buttcrack.
    Posts
    105
    Quote Originally Posted by daviski View Post
    I do have a hospital bed and a lot of other things to make things more manageable at home. We had about a weak between flying home and being admitted here too work out logistics. Apparently only one ligament was severely damaged, not one I recognized. I could post the CT scan analysis, it's pretty fucking grim
    I had a type VI last year, just one leg though. Can't imagine two at the same time. +1 on the suggestion for blood thinners. I slacked off, and ended up with several clots that took a while to clear.
    Reach out if you have any questions, and best of luck with your surgeries and healing journey.

  10. #1935
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    621
    Damn Daviski! That's terrible! I had a type V in one leg and that was brutal. I can't even imagine both legs. One positive I would point out is as violent as that crash was it's really good luck you didn't end up with compartment syndrome.

    Only advise I have is just keep grinding. Everyday is a new battle that you can win. I know it's a metaphor, but seriously take it one day at a time. At least for me, thinking about the big picture and long recovery was not good for my mental health.

    Shoot me a PM if you want to chat about it. The hardest part for me was not knowing when I would progress during healing. Those first two weeks were pretty terrifying not knowing if that brutal pain would ever stop. It did and I'm back on skis again, but a TPF will absolutely change your perspective on life.

    Prayers and vibes from CO. Nobody should ever have to go through a double TPF!

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