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  1. #126
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Selkirks
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    210
    Yeah, a combi boiler would be the way to go for a small space for sure. I've heard good things about Navien but i've never installed any myself. I generally install Viessmann, they've been super reliable for me. They have a heat exchanger add-on for the Vitodens 100 boiler which i've been pretty happy with but they have a dedicated combi coming out this year apparently.

    As far as installing infloor tubing I can't stress enough how important fully insulating the slab is, especially the perimeter. You should have no slab to footing/foundation contact at all. A common technique to avoid having to do a funky notch in the foundation is to rip 2" styro on an angle leaving 1/2" on the top edge that will be flush with the slab surface, that way drywall & baseboard will cover it. (last example in pic)

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    "It's like we're watching a movie... and then suddenly we're acting in it."

  2. #127
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    写道
    Posts
    11,133
    Sweet layout, Wendigo. I may use that design, or a variation of it, on my new place. It would suit my needs (and future needs) pretty nicely.
    ˇÓrale, vato!

  3. #128
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    I smell poutine!!!
    Posts
    8,271
    Quote Originally Posted by steepconcrete View Post
    It's like killing a fire in a huge brick fireplace. The fire may be out but the bricks are still heating as they are super hot.
    And the opposite problem. It takes forever to heat up in the first place if it is off or out.
    Real VTers tap trees.

  4. #129
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    8,203
    Our in floor radiant is staple up in a crawl space. Insulated with normal pink insulation. Supposedly it isn't the best way to do it but works great for us and our utility bills are very low. Also makes it easily accessible. We also have a Vermont castings natural gas fireplace that is on a thermostat. This helps the radiant keep up and not fluctuate as much or have to work so hard. Works great for us.

  5. #130
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Selkirks
    Posts
    210
    Quote Originally Posted by steepconcrete View Post
    I would not want in floor heat anywhere the temperature fluctuates. My in laws just built a place with radiant heat (is that in floor? Apologies if not I'm not good with the terms)

    Anyhow if it gets warm and the system or you shut off the floor heat it's still gonna be warm and cooling very slow making it that much harder to stay comfy.

    It's like killing a fire in a huge brick fireplace. The fire may be out but the bricks are still heating as they are super hot.
    This can happen but less of an issue in a well insulated building, especially if you employ some passive solar building practices ie. shading of south windows to block high summer sun and allow in low winter sun & minimizing the use of west facing windows. As well any infloor heating system needs to be regulated by an outdoor temperature compensated control (most new boilers have this built in) so the colder it gets outside the warmer the water gets being circulated in the floor. Just having a thermostat for control will have large temperature swings as the boiler will be set at a static high temp and the thermostat will struggle to control it and inevitably overshoot.
    "It's like we're watching a movie... and then suddenly we're acting in it."

  6. #131
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Hyperspace!
    Posts
    1,037
    Thanks for the heating info, I like the bevel cut insulation method - hadn't seen that before. We are aware of the pros and cons of infloor heat (lag times, etc.) if the place were only going to be a garage I would just throw a minisplit and a woodstove in there and call it good. A concrete floor is a substantial mass and hanging out on one for a winter with only forced air heat isn't really fun or cozy. Plus a warm floor is a great place to dry out ski clothes. Plus if it gets to hot, I'll just open a garage door.

    Current plan is to set it up as 1 zone with 2 loops, definitely leaning toward the combi/indirect type system due to the small scale (and I don't wan't to drink water that has been sitting in my floor for an extended period of time). The number of companies pitching radiant systems and the number of different types of boilers and systems is a bit off-putting for a diy hack like me.

  7. #132
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    46,976
    Do you have gas at the property? We put in a Lochinvar condensing gas unit that's driving both radiant in the lower level and forced air upstairs, it seems like a good product and was well-reviewed, no issues after 2 heating seasons. Not sure if they make propane versions or not.

  8. #133
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Hyperspace!
    Posts
    1,037
    propane, oil, or electric - leaning toward propane.

  9. #134
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    46,976
    I just looked it up and Lochinvar units can be ordered for either Natural Gas or Propane if you're interested in them.

  10. #135
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    4,575
    Does any special thought need to go into a garage door being installed in a residential space for a cold climate? I ask only because most I've seen before don't look especially well sealed or insulated.

  11. #136
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    11,828

    Cabin Design - Seeking your ideas

    You can get insulated doors, but they will not have an air seal any better than any other roll up door.

    That said, better to have an insulated door than not...

  12. #137
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Hyperspace!
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    1,037
    Roof goes on this week. Be dried in soon.
    Roof got pushed up to 3:12 instead of the 2:12 I wanted - simply for ease of building a metal roof that will last. Other than that it is basically the same as the design previously posted. The spaces at the top of the walls (and down the middle) are reserved for big ass glulams.
    Likely going with the Navien combi boiler for the 3 loops of heating and dhw.

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  13. #138
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    North Vancouver
    Posts
    593
    Glad this thread got bumped. I thought I posted my wood stove earlier but could not find it.
    Sunk a piece of stainless into the floor for my hearth. Sweeping is a breeze. My firewood box has now been replaced with a sexy stell box rather than the wooden one pictured.


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    What if "Alternative" energy wasn't so alternative ?

  14. #139
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    11,265
    Quote Originally Posted by wendigo View Post
    Roof goes on this week. Be dried in soon.
    Roof got pushed up to 3:12 instead of the 2:12 I wanted - simply for ease of building a metal roof that will last. Other than that it is basically the same as the design previously posted. The spaces at the top of the walls (and down the middle) are reserved for big ass glulams.
    Likely going with the Navien combi boiler for the 3 loops of heating and dhw.

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    Do me a favor. If anything check my buddies new venture might be able to get yourself in the beta testing for free.

    https://coleforgestoves.com

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using TGR Forums mobile app
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  15. #140
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Golden BC
    Posts
    3,617
    Quote Originally Posted by bad dancer View Post
    How big is your footprint and how high are your piers ? I'm trying to decide what to do whith my next project. It will be a 6 foot drop over 36' in one corner. not sure if i want to go that high with tubes. i'm considering a concrete pony wall in that corner and build up off of it.
    missed question, cabin is 20' by 32' with 3 rows of piers some one mid span on the 20' , piers each row 4. top of pier 4' above grade
    Mrs. Dougw- "I can see how one of your relatives could have been killed by an angry mob."

    Quote Originally Posted by ill-advised strategy View Post
    dougW, you motherfucking dirty son of a bitch.

  16. #141
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    North Vancouver
    Posts
    593

    outdoor cabin kitchen

    Had a chance to put some finishing touches on the outdoor kitchen.
    I used a rough board form for the counter supports. turned out pretty cool.
    Just need to drop in the sink and put the fixtures in.


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    What if "Alternative" energy wasn't so alternative ?

  17. #142
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    980
    Quote Originally Posted by bad dancer View Post
    Glad this thread got bumped. I thought I posted my wood stove earlier but could not find it.
    Sunk a piece of stainless into the floor for my hearth. Sweeping is a breeze. My firewood box has now been replaced with a sexy stell box rather than the wooden one pictured.


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    These little squirrel stoves are awesome. Mine.
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  18. #143
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    North Vancouver
    Posts
    593
    Love my squirrel !
    It is in installed to code with only 4 inches to the back wall.
    Great heat and low profile. My place is so small that I simply cant have it stick out into the room too much.
    What if "Alternative" energy wasn't so alternative ?

  19. #144
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    North Vancouver
    Posts
    593
    Is that copper in the back ? It looks good.
    What if "Alternative" energy wasn't so alternative ?

  20. #145
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    980
    yes, copper. While I don't know the science behind it. It stays cool to the touch always. I cut more 10-12" wood than anything else. Fun to see how little wood I can actually heat the room with.

  21. #146
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SF & the Ho
    Posts
    5,630
    Timely bump. That squirrel stove looks awesome. I need something small like that. Looks like that about as small a foot print as possible for a wood burning stove?

  22. #147
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Hugh's Mom's House
    Posts
    11,830
    wendigo to the update courtesy phone...

  23. #148
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    46,976
    This was probably mentioned earlier in the thread but it's a good site: https://cabinporn.com

    just page down. Don't click on the book (unless you want to buy it!)

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