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  1. #101
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    Feb 2008
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    Heh. Page top.

    Quote Originally Posted by kevin mueller View Post
    Some stuff that has already been said...
    Stoke first, fire later?

    Quote Originally Posted by telestoner View Post
    The point of the Schoennagel paper was that different rocky mtn forest types and locations have different fire regimes. Lodgepole stands (around here anyway) are dense and have lots of understory branches. When weather conditions are right, they go, and they go big, and the return intervals are long. In the absence of fire suppression, Ponderosa pine stands tend to have frequent low-severity fires that clean out the understory. The implication is that fuels management is kind of a lost cause in the lodgepole, whereas it makes a lot of sense in ponderosa.
    I agree the fuels management could be a lost cause in some lodgepole, but what about lodgepole stands that have had fire suppressed in the past? Could some of those stands benefit, in terms of health, from some sort of actual management?
    For example, a 100 year old lp stand ignites and is suppressed before most of the stand is torched. Should we let it keep growing, potentially losing health and increasing its susceptibility to MBP attack? Or could this stand be a candidate for some type of management?

    Quote Originally Posted by PowTrees View Post
    In Colorado, Ponderosa grow below 8,000 feet mostly. How many Ponderosa pines do you see in Vail or Summit county? Lodgepole Pine grow from 4,000 or 5,000 feet on the front range all the way up to 10,000 feet or so. The article above is obviously wrong because many of us can see/hike through Lodgepole and Aspen above 8,000 feet growing together.

    Comparing Ponderosa and Lodgepole is wrong imho.
    I think grrrr was just using ponderosa to show that there are differences in fire regimes, in terms of return intervals.

    Quote Originally Posted by revitup View Post
    This is all cause of mans mismanagment. Greedy, arrogant, selfrightious fucks.
    Save the planet, kill yourself!
    I laughed.

    Would you kick off that crusade?
    fun hater.

  2. #102
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    Feb 2014
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    8+ year bump...Do any of you spray your trees yearly for beetles?

  3. #103
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    Sep 2002
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    OREYGUN!
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    FWIG trunk injection is much more effective than spraying.

  4. #104
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    Nov 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by permnation View Post
    8+ year bump...Do any of you spray your trees yearly for beetles?
    It only work if all the property around you does it and you reveg.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  5. #105
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    Feb 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    It only work if all the property around you does it and you reveg.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Thanks for the response.

  6. #106
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    Nov 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by permnation View Post
    Thanks for the response.
    And, in Grand County, the trees are dead but the beatles are pretty much gone.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  7. #107
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    Sep 2002
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    OREYGUN!
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    Pine Beetle Kill

    Injections work regardless of what others around you do. Also safer for other non targets as the only insects killed are the ones that actually eat the tree.

  8. #108
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    Dec 2010
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    The 8th best place in the LBP
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    I didn't want to spray. We had good luck using the pheromone packets. Only lost a few trees after putting those spaced around the property. But that was 5-6 years ago. The beetles seemed to have mostly moved on from our neck of the woods now.

  9. #109
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    Feb 2014
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    ^ Great info guys! I am going to look into the injections and pheromone packs. Spraying insecticide all over a tree just doesn't seem right. It must do some harm to other good bugs.

  10. #110
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    Nov 2012
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    25
    If there are active beetle populations in your yard the best protection is to spray individual trees with carbaryl. The treatment lasts two years but people dont want to gamble so they spray annualy. The trees you spray need to be Uninfested by bark beetles. Anti aggergant pheromone packs are placebo

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albeer View Post
    Anti aggergant pheromone packs are placebo
    Better tell the Forest Service and the BLM because they use them all over the place after thinning out the dead trees.

  12. #112
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    Nov 2012
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    25
    There is an anti aggergant pheromone that works against Douglas-for beetle. Agencies practice many "white hat" projects, placebos can work

  13. #113
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    Oct 2008
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    Vernon BC
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    So what happened to all the pine beetles? It was the end of forestry as we knew it several years ago, now (in the BC interior anyway) much of the beetle kill wood has been harvested and processed. several mills have laid off the extra shifts they put on to process the beetle kill wood, and they are getting back to their regular allotments.
    "Its not the arrow, its the Indian" - M.Pinto

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmcrawfo View Post
    So what happened to all the pine beetles? It was the end of forestry as we knew it several years ago, now (in the BC interior anyway) much of the beetle kill wood has been harvested and processed. several mills have laid off the extra shifts they put on to process the beetle kill wood, and they are getting back to their regular allotments.
    Actually, the beetles are always there, but healthy trees can withstand them. It's when trees are stressed by drought or overstocking or age that they're vulnerable to beetles and you get widespread beetle kills.
    And I guess that I just don't know

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meadow Skipper View Post
    Actually, the beetles are always there, but healthy trees can withstand them. It's when trees are stressed by drought or overstocking or age that they're vulnerable to beetles and you get widespread beetle kills.
    Huh.. nature.
    "Its not the arrow, its the Indian" - M.Pinto

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmcrawfo View Post
    Huh.. nature.
    Right? If it doesn't burn...
    And I guess that I just don't know

  17. #117
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    ^^Yep. It was a good thing IMO. The beetles killed an incredible amount of trees in the forests around Helena, and it looked really bad for a couple years with all the red/dead needles, like the hills would be totally bare eventually. But now only the live trees are left standing, and you realize there still are a lot of trees there...not as many as before, which was way too many for the climate to support I guess, but still a lot of trees that the beetles did not kill. Been kind of interesting to watch it all unfold. We probably lost 80-100 trees on our ten acres. But still there are more than enough remaining.

  18. #118
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    May 2007
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    37
    Beetles blow up, then like lemmings, they die en masse. Little flare-ups now in ips beetle and tussock moth here.
    I'm so hot right now!

  19. #119
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    Jul 2005
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    Verdi NV
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    Nice bump. I am burning Beetle kill tamarack in the fire place right now. Heavy sap filled wood with the holes in it.

    Burns like coal, hot and for a very long time. wish I could get a couple more cords of this stuff
    Own your fail. ~Jer~

  20. #120
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    Aug 2006
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    4,506
    I did a pesticide injection/implants recommended by a friend/tree guy on several of our keeper trees two spring/summers ago when it was really bad. None of them got infected during a really bad outbreak in my neighborhood, but that also coincided with a very wet winter. It'll be interesting to see what happens in my area after this current winter.

    The USFs researcher that was cruising around discussing said that they were having success against western pine beetle with a combo of pesticide/fungicide implants. At the time, they were not commercially available. I'm not sure about now.

    Anybody see the new patagonia catalog. In the catalog there is a picture of a girl jugging up an overhang in Yosemite valley with some large pine beetle kills in the valley bottom background.

  21. #121
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    Apr 2012
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    Golden
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    All part of the process of Mother Nature. Summit County, CO is seeing great aspen growth in the beetle kill areas. The aspen will flourish, then the pines will start growing, kill off the aspen and it starts over again.

    Hopefully the pine growth will be spread out and keep the forest from becoming too much of the same age.

  22. #122
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    Aug 2006
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    In California, there is strong support for habitat type conversion.

  23. #123
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    Dec 2009
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    SE Idaho
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    I spent a few days last summer on the north slope of the Uintas in Utah. I'd say 2 out of every 3 trees were dead. I've seen beetle kill forests my whole life in Idaho, Wyoming and Montana but nothing like that. That place is ripe for a massive fire.
    Hunting kicks ass.
    Chicks dig Labs.
    I'll keep my job, my money and my guns and you can keep the change.
    From my cold dead hands.

  24. #124
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    Jan 2005
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    Bend, OR
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    192
    Quote Originally Posted by Meadow Skipper View Post
    Actually, the beetles are always there, but healthy trees can withstand them. It's when trees are stressed by drought or overstocking or age that they're vulnerable to beetles and you get widespread beetle kills.
    Much of the argument I've always heard is that the beetle populations need to be kept in check by cold winters, and occasionally extremely cold winters to really hammer them down. A few warm winters in a row and they can advance pretty substantially. So maybe conditions have been a bit colder for them lately? Probably a function of several factors as usual.

    https://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/formain15814/$file/MPBColdTemperaturesFacts-Jan2010.pdf?OpenElement

    https://www.fs.fed.us/rmrs/frequentl...eetle-epidemic

  25. #125
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    Mar 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldengatestinx View Post
    All part of the process of Mother Nature. Summit County, CO is seeing great aspen growth in the beetle kill areas. The aspen will flourish, then the pines will start growing, kill off the aspen and it starts over again.

    Hopefully the pine growth will be spread out and keep the forest from becoming too much of the same age.
    Wtf is with this random thread bump?


    I see barely any aspens in summit county, most of the regrowth I have seen is pine.

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