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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    99

    Analysis of Avalanche Safety Equipment for Backcountry Skiiers

    Found the below report to be an interesting read for the various recovery and survival devices on the market. Does not look to be a rerun but I am sure some of you have seen it as it is dated 2002.

    http://www.abssystem.com/abs-Dateien...02%20_%20e.pdf

    As far as I can tell it is not a commissioned report by the company on whose site it is sitting on (abssystems) and it does properly note that the best way to survive an avalanche is NOT to get in one.

    I have never seen an inflatable system in use and normally try to stay away from adding more complicated (possible gimmicky) gear to my setup (especially at the price its offered at). Curious as to whether any maggots have any thoughts or experience?
    There are no trees, only lines I choose not to take.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    165
    Interesting site. I took a level 1 avalanche course last winter and the instructor talked that type of device up quite a bit, but did not have any samples to play with so I have never seen one personally. The idea makes sense though, it acts just like a life jacket.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    R.O.C.
    Posts
    4,034
    I saw a lot of those flotation devices when I was skiing in Europe a few years ago.They seemed to have high regards for them,especially for the inexperienced.
    Calmer than you dude

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    29,351
    Considering a few frogs got their asses saved by them, there's a reason they're out there. But if you look even remotely like a fukk and get in the Midi tram with one, you are in for a shitswirl of agony.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Leysin, Switzerland
    Posts
    1,262
    The last paragraph on the first page is of utmost importance.

    While I wear a beacon and carry a shovel and probe, I think of it like riding a motorcycle with a helmet. Sure, it helps reduce the danger of death, but there are a number of other important factors to consider which can lead to death regardless of the helmet/beacon.

    My point:
    This device might be good, but it addresses one of the better case scenarios of being caught in an avalanche, as do most devices.

    Otherwise, according to the study, it seems an effective device.
    Ski, Bike, Climb.
    Resistence is futile.

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