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  1. #76
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    Oct 2003
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    Her family's loss is Talk and Then Die Syndrome awareness' gain.

    RIP.

  2. #77
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    Mar 2005
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    Denver, CO
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    Wonder how long before resorts require helmets for all instructors and those taking lessons. Surely they don't provide much protection if you slam into a tree at moderate speeds, but I'm sure this incident and many others alike could have resulted more favorably.

  3. #78
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    May 2004
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    Colorado Cartel HQ
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    At times I take my monoski out to Keystone.

    This puts me skill-wise, about in the middle of the pack with the rest of the skiers there.

    Going roughly the same speed as the rest of the mid-westerners down schoolmarm is nothing short of wicked dangerous.

    I think most of us slalom through the gapers instead of skiing with them at their speed. This is definitely safer. (skiing faster than those most likely to run into you is a great thing)

    I believe good skiers tend to forget how much different (and dangerous) the ski experience is for those not so accustomed to it.

    +++++vibes+++++ to this lady....she died doing something most of us live for.
    Follow me on Instagram

    brett.mcnary

  4. #79
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    Feb 2007
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    754
    Quote Originally Posted by NPG View Post
    Wonder how long before resorts require helmets for all instructors and those taking lessons. Surely they don't provide much protection if you slam into a tree at moderate speeds, but I'm sure this incident and many others alike could have resulted more favorably.
    I really can't believe that they don't require staff (instructors/ski patrol/mountain safety/mountain guides) to wear helmets all the time. I think the Whistler Kids program requires helment, only because I have never seen a kid with a bib not wearing one. They should even let the instructors get commision on helemt sales, just have then hand out 15% off helmet coupons with a bar code tied to their name.

    I don't know if they rent helmets or not, I haven't been in the rental area in a long time.

  5. #80
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    Jan 2009
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    Washington
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Big Lost View Post
    Something doesn't add up, at least to me. Normal fall? What is that? Ski Patrol and Instructor accompanied her back to her room? Why do that for a normal fall? Seems odd. It must have been more than just a "normal" fall.

    A flat place late in the season might = hard as a rock. Bounced her head me thinks. We have all seen places where the snow has turned to cement.

    If that isn't what happened.... then this is very hard to explain...perhaps a pre-existing condition?
    exactly what I was thinking.
    She must have had a history with head injury.
    "Life's a game, don't be a loser"

  6. #81
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    Mar 2007
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    Eugenio Oregón
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    Scientific American put up a nice layman's medical summary of the issues here:
    http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=...die-richardson

    If you have an aneurysm or a weakened vessel, it may not take much? Reading all this ski resort fatality stuff lately (and also taking a WFA course and learning how I and the patrollers didn't take nearly enough precaution afterwards) has gotten me spooked after my crash 2 weeks ago - I feel like a lucky SOB.
    _______________________________________________
    "Strapping myself to a sitski built with 30lb of metal and fibreglass then trying to water ski in it sounds like a stupid idea to me.

    I'll be there."
    ... Andy Campbell

  7. #82
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    Oct 2003
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    MI
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    Post

    Holy shit. That is soooo fucked up. Vibes to her family.
    Balls Deep in the 'Ho

  8. #83
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    Dec 2004
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    Incline Village, NV (Tahoe)
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    5,494
    RIP



    How twisted that her husband starred in a recent film entitled "Taken".
    Every man dies. Not every man lives.
    You don’t stop playing because you grow old; you grow old because you stop playing.

  9. #84
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    Feb 2004
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    a few blocks from the beach
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    RIP, so sad.
    .

  10. #85
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    May 2006
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    Eagle County
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    I happen to be VERY close to someone that is a work comp professional. Amazing the # of patrollers, instructors, red coats, etc... that don't wear helmets.

    Vibes to the family and friends......

    Helmets are like seatbelts to me.....just wear em.
    ROLL TIDE ROLL

  11. #86
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    Dec 2006
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    crown of the continent
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    Wow. I'd kind of heard of her, but what a life!!!

    -----------snip--------------
    WashPost:

    Tony Award-winning actress Natasha Richardson, 45, a member of a British acting dynasty, died March 18 from a head injury she suffered while skiing.

    Ms. Richardson, a daughter of Academy Award-winning actress and human rights activist Vanessa Redgrave and the wife of actor Liam Neeson, fell on a beginners' slope near Montreal during a ski lesson March 16. Ms. Richardson initially appeared uninjured, but an hour later, she complained of a headache. As her condition worsened, she was flown to a hospital near her home in New York City, where her family gathered.

    Ms. Richardson's father was producer Tony Richardson ("Tom Jones"). Her maternal grandparents were actors Michael Redgrave and Rachel Kempson. An aunt is actress Lynn Redgrave, with whom Ms. Richardson and her mother appeared in the 2005 Merchant Ivory film "The White Countess."

    Ms. Richardson might have been overshadowed by the public profiles of her family members, particularly her mother's, but she was widely respected for the quality and versatility of her performances.

    She won a Tony Award for the 1998 Broadway revival of the musical "Cabaret," in which she played bohemian showgirl Sally Bowles, and she starred in a variety of film, TV and stage productions. She played Blanche Du Bois in Tennessee Williams's "A Streetcar Named Desire" (2005) and appeared in Disney's remake of "The Parent Trap" (1998).

    As a young woman, Ms. Richardson was considered one of the most promising actresses of her generation and earned a reputation as a specialist in formidable dramatic parts. She received a Tony nomination and outstanding notices for her lead role as a woman with a dark past in a 1993 Broadway revival of the Eugene O'Neill waterfront story "Anna Christie."

    Director Paul Schrader, who cast Ms. Richardson in several movies, once noted how she "had an essential quality of mystery about her. You can watch her for the better part of two hours, and still think that she'll show you something new."

    In addition to Schrader's "Patty Hearst" (1988), in which she played the kidnapped heiress, and the psychological thriller "The Comfort of Strangers" (1990), Ms. Richardson starred in literary dramas including "A Month in the Country" (1987) with Colin Firth and "The Handmaid's Tale" (1990) with Robert Duvall.

    She made some attempts to raise her profile, appearing in "The Parent Trap," with Lindsay Lohan, and in "Maid in Manhattan" (2002), portraying a frosty socialite opposite a hotel maid played by Jennifer Lopez.

    Film scholar David Kipen said: "Richardson radiated intelligence in everything she did. She won raves for Shakespeare, Chekhov, O'Neill, Williams and Ibsen, and she could sing, besides. If the movies never knew quite what to do with her, that strikes me more as the medium's fault than hers."

    Natasha Jane Richardson was born in London on May 11, 1963. She made her stage debut at 4, directed by her father while playing her mother's bridesmaid in the movie "The Charge of the Light Brigade." Her parents' marriage ended about that time. Tony Richardson died of AIDS-related complications in 1991.

    At 17, Ms. Richardson passed her audition at London's Central School of Speech and Drama without revealing her true name. She debuted in London's West End theater district as Nina in a 1985 revival of Anton Chekhov's "The Seagull" that starred her mother. It was a daunting way to start her professional career, but she later told the New York Times: "If you jump in at the deep end, you only have to swim to the shallow end. But if you jump in at the shallow end, the deep end seems awfully far away."

    During the show's run, she began a relationship with "Seagull" producer Robert Fox, and they later married. She left him to marry Neeson, with whom she appeared in "Anna Christie."

    Survivors include Neeson and their two sons; her mother; and a sister, actress Joely Richardson.

    Ms. Richardson's early films included "Gothic" (1986), a sexually provocative drama directed by Ken Russell. She played the mistress of atomic scientist J. Robert Oppenheimer in "Fat Man and Little Boy" (1989) and a court-appointed psychiatrist in "Nell" (1994), starring Jodie Foster. She also portrayed the troubled Catharine in a TV version of Tennessee Williams's "Suddenly, Last Summer" (1993) opposite Maggie Smith.
    ----------snip---------
    Something about the wrinkle in your forehead tells me there's a fit about to get thrown
    And I never hear a single word you say when you tell me not to have my fun
    It's the same old shit that I ain't gonna take off anyone.
    and I never had a shortage of people tryin' to warn me about the dangers I pose to myself.

    Patterson Hood of the DBT's

  12. #87
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    Jan 2006
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    Cyburbia & Tahoe, CA
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    4,437
    How sad. Weird story with the delayed onset and stuff. Only good thing I can see coming from this is that maybe more people will wear helmets.
    **
    I'm a cougar, not a MILF! I have to protect my rep! - bklyn

    In any case, if you're ever really in this situation make sure you at least bargain in a couple of fluffers.
    -snowsprite

  13. #88
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    Apr 2008
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    No children.
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    This is so sad.

    Rest in Peace.
    Quote Originally Posted by bptempleton View Post
    tit ass balls. that's a better sig. or fucktardnutz. YOU MUST NOW CHOOSE!!!!

  14. #89
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    Sep 2005
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    In rain shadow of the Sierra CC,NV
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    Unhappy Bye 'tasha

    Sad, and surprising.
    Quote Originally Posted by waxman View Post
    why is this news?
    the only good thing about the whole affair is now the USAians that care more about "celebritys" (who was she again) can forget about their craptacular mortgage crisis...
    ???
    Good thing???
    So, what do you consider News, then?
    Not a minor celeb dying in very unusual circumstances, and not the meltdown of Capitalism

    ...Remember, those who think Global Warming is Fake, also think that Adam & Eve were Real...

  15. #90
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    Oct 2003
    Location
    Seattle
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    17,730
    It's a tragedy all around. RIP, Natasha.

  16. #91
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    Apr 2008
    Location
    So. NH/ NEK
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    99
    +++++++++++vibes+++++++++++++++++
    to her, her family and especially the instructor
    I had a similar experience earlier this teaching a disabled student one weekend, came back up the next weekend and my boss told me he got sick driving home and died later that week.

  17. #92
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    Apr 2007
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    921
    Quote Originally Posted by NPG View Post
    Surely they don't provide much protection if you slam into a tree at moderate speeds, but I'm sure this incident and many others alike could have resulted more favorably.

    I slammed into a tree at moderate speeds last year, and this is what happened to my helmet. I skied away fine. WEAR A FUCKING HELMET, PEOPLE
    ---------------

  18. #93
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    Mar 2009
    Location
    Reno, NV
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    52
    My heart and prayers go out to her family.

  19. #94
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    Dec 2008
    Location
    Zürich, Switzerland
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    100
    Vibes to here family and friends.
    Also vibes to the instructor. I felt bad when I had a learner break her wrist on a nursery slope. But to die? He must be feeling like absolute shit at the moment.

  20. #95
    Definitely a bad day for the family. My condolences to them.
    Have been considering a helmet for the past 2 seasons, and while I was going to get one anyways this just underscores the fact that it can happen anytime to anyone.
    Vibes.

  21. #96
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    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5

    What really happened?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tauby View Post
    exactly what I was thinking.
    She must have had a history with head injury.
    I'm wondering the same thing. Would altitude sickness play a factor? If there was already a lack of oxygen to the brain what kind of affect would that have in a fall? And putting her on a plane? Could that have compounded the injury or was she already "brain dead" and the papers didn't report that? I know sometimes they transport people home on life support to give friends and family a chance to say goodbye before they pull the plug. But if she was in critical, why try to move her and put her in a plane that has to be pressurized and repressurized? Plus, small planes bounce around.

    I'm just trying to get my head around the idea of dying from a low-speed beginner fall. There've got to be other factors! Any patrol out there that can shed some light?

    BTW, resorts are reluctant to command instructors to wear helmets.
    1) if it's a required item yet non-essential (like having skis or a board), then they could be forced to provide helmets to all employees- that's a big cost
    2)If an employee gets hurt while wearing a helmet they were required to wear, they could sue claiming the accident wouldn't have happened but for the helmet (like it blocked his vision or snapped his neck wrong). Same goes for a person in ski school. If helmets were required in a lesson and someone gets hurt while wearing one, you might have a lawsuit on your hands.

    Besides, unless a helmet law is federally mandated, a ski resort would assume a tremendous amount of liability if they create their own rule.
    Studies show that helmets don't always prevent head injuries. That could be enough for a 'victim' to win in court.

    The IFSA DOES enforce a helmet rule but most of those competitors don't have traditional insurance and any outside personal injury attorney would be hard pressed to find a winable case when no one's putting a gun to an athlete's head and making him huck a 30-footer onto hardpack. Big difference between an unforeseeable accident and a foreseeable one.

    Bottomline- Every experienced skier knows a helmet is better than nothing so requiring a helmet is - for lack of a better pun- a no brainer.

    just some thoughts....

  22. #97
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    Oct 2003
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    Jack Tone Road
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    Would altitude sickness play a factor?
    At Tremblant?

    if she was in critical, why try to move her and put her in a plane that has to be pressurized and repressurized?
    Huh?

    Besides, unless a helmet law is federally mandated, a ski resort would assume a tremendous amount of liability if they create their own rule.
    Studies show that helmets don't always prevent head injuries. That could be enough for a 'victim' to win in court.
    Double huh?

  23. #98
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    Apr 2008
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    I-70
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcskigal View Post

    Besides, unless a helmet law is federally mandated, a ski resort would assume a tremendous amount of liability if they create their own rule.
    Studies show that helmets don't always prevent head injuries. That could be enough for a 'victim' to win in court.
    That is so not true.

    Even in Texas, the most sue happy state, some skate parks would require helmets, knee pads and elbow pads, some required just a helmet and others had no rules. All of them (I think) required a helmet for people under 18, on the basis that it could help prevent an injury.

  24. #99
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    59
    As unfortunately demonstrated here, it doesn't take as much force as you might think to severely injure your brain. Think about taking a 15 pound melon and dropping it onto hardpack/ice from 5 to 6' in the air.

    My very first wreck I responded to at Squaw was just by the lower Siberia patrol shack where the terrain is flat. A woman in her late 20's on a snowboard slid on an icy patch and lost her heel side edge. I watched it happen and while her head hit hard, it didn't look that bad. She sat up immediately, but then stayed there for a couple of minutes so I walked up slope to check on her. She went from complaining about a headache to unresponsive w/ raccoon eyes in about 10 minutes. In this case, luckily, she had fractured her skull, which allowed for a release of some of the built up pressure on the brain.

    Anyway, the fall was outwardly pretty innocuous, especially compared to watching somebody ragdoll down a cliff band, but the force can be higher when you stop suddenly. i.e. your head hitting the ice from 5' up.

    doesn't take much..

    Thoughts are with the family..

  25. #100
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Middle of the NEK
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    4,302
    Always sad to hear about accidents like this. RIP Natasha and condolences to the family.

    Makes you think how many of these types of deaths never make headlines in the media when they happen to non-famous people.

    I know my helmet has saved my noggin; on a race night at Bretton Woods no less! I was coming down to the starting area (on a green trail). It was still early season and the mtn had just received 4-5" of fluffy powder. Just above the race starting area, between a light pole and the trees, there looked to be a couple of powder puffs that I decided to try to sink my skis into. I went in and under the 4 inches of fluff was several frozen chunks of mud, apparently escavated from a nearby waterbar. My skis got wedged between a couple of these chunks stopping them and all of my momentum went straight into my head, which then when straight into the ground. I was only moving at about 10 mph. The crash happened so fast. I think I laid there with my face in the snow for a few seconds as I gathered myself together. I hit forehead first and I was amazed that I still had all of my teeth. The impact cracked my helmet although I still felt a bit woozy (slightly concused). I truely believe that if I had not been wearing my helmet, I would have been severely concussed or worse.

    Helmets are also great in the trees. Pre-helmet I was constantly having to hike back up to retrieve my tuke that had been pulled off by branches.

    Quote Originally Posted by pcskigal View Post
    I'm wondering the same thing. Would altitude sickness play a factor? If there was already a lack of oxygen to the brain what kind of affect would that have in a fall?
    Did you even research where Tremblant is before asking this question? There are definitely no altitude issues there. Base area is around 900' and the summit just short of around 2900'. Skiers at Eastern North American resorts don't suffer from any high altitude problems.
    Aim for the chopping block. If you aim for the wood, you will have nothing. Aim past the wood, aim through the wood.
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