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  1. #51
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    Jul 2009
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    Jackson
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oceanic View Post
    Hmm, been standing in front of the mirror on various footbeds. I thought I needed arch support, now I'm starting to think that what I actually need is the 'canting' effect that is a side effect of arch supports.

    ie Arch support makes the medial side of the footbed higher than the lateral side, which shifts the way the knee tracks, and has a similar effect to canting the boot soles.
    A lot of boots have a canting adjustment in the hinge of the upper boot cuff. Your footbed should not be setting you up to fail as far as canting goes. If it does you should balance that out.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    140
    Quote Originally Posted by galenparke View Post
    A lot of boots have a canting adjustment in the hinge of the upper boot cuff.
    By 'canting' I meant planing the boot sole. Careful, the terminology nazis might show up here now Gaperski Forum is no more.

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oceanic View Post
    Hmm, been standing in front of the mirror on various footbeds. I thought I needed arch support, now I'm starting to think that what I actually need is the 'canting' effect that is a side effect of arch supports.

    ie Arch support makes the medial side of the footbed higher than the lateral side, which shifts the way the knee tracks, and has a similar effect to canting the boot soles.
    If you pronate, especially in the rear foot, you might see substantial benefit from footbeds. If you don't, you might get away with just canting. Personally, I need both, but, of the two, the footbed/orthotic is far more important.
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

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  4. #54
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
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    17,960
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Springskiin View Post
    A lot of boots have a canting adjustment in the hinge of the upper boot cuff. Your footbed should not be setting you up to fail as far as canting goes. If it does you should balance that out.
    I don't think it cuff cant does the same thing as a foot bed or grinding the boot sole (never ground boot soles)

    I used to crank the cuff cant all the way to deal with flatfeet/knock knee but when I got new boots the only thing that fit me was Vulcans that had no cuff cant

    but foot beds seemed to take care of my issues, cuff cant is usually only on the outside hinge of a boot but I also have some dalbellos with cuff cant on both hinges ... i leave them neutral
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    1,623
    Quote Originally Posted by Oceanic View Post
    Hmm, been standing in front of the mirror on various footbeds. I thought I needed arch support, now I'm starting to think that what I actually need is the 'canting' effect that is a side effect of arch supports.

    ie Arch support makes the medial side of the footbed higher than the lateral side, which shifts the way the knee tracks, and has a similar effect to canting the boot soles.
    Custom footbeds. They do far more than arch support. They are made to set your stance neutral.
    Grinding will result in a non DIN sole and more liability than most shops would probably want to deal with!

  6. #56
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    Sep 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuco View Post
    Custom footbeds. They do far more than arch support. They are made to set your stance neutral.
    Grinding will result in a non DIN sole and more liability than most shops would probably want to deal with!
    Huh? I'm pretty sure planing/canting a boot still ends up with a DIN sole if done correctly.
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

    photos

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    西 雅 圖
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    3,152
    Quote Originally Posted by tuco View Post
    Grinding will result in a non DIN sole and more liability than most shops would probably want to deal with!
    If you plane a boot sole to correct stance you normally bring it back to ISO/DIN spec before it goes out the door - toe height 19mm plus or minus 1mm, heel height 30mm plus or minus 1mm, and top and bottom surfaces parallel. You do this by adding material and/or routing the surfaces that contact the binding. The same applies to adding Cantology or SVST shims. Many true race boots come with a thicker, non-ISO sole assuming you will do this.

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by auvgeek View Post
    Huh? I'm pretty sure planing/canting a boot still ends up with a DIN sole if done correctly.
    If done correctly still seems pretty sketch to me. Still gonna have to find a specialty shop to do it. Last resort option IMO. Grind 1 side then build up the other--no thanks!
    Quote Originally Posted by gregL View Post
    If you plane a boot sole to correct stance you normally bring it back to ISO/DIN spec before it goes out the door - toe height 19mm plus or minus 1mm, heel height 30mm plus or minus 1mm, and top and bottom surfaces parallel. You do this by adding material and/or routing the surfaces that contact the binding. The same applies to adding Cantology or SVST shims. Many true race boots come with a thicker, non-ISO sole assuming you will do this.
    Yeah you are talking hightly specialized equipment and its more than likely he's got some pretty regular boots
    May as well just get Daleboots, unless your true competitive racing, the only place I could see it being worth it!!

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    voting in seattle
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    4,034
    I'm confused as to who is building footbeds that take up more volume than the stock foam insoles in your boots.

    Superfeet are built around the concept of stabilizing your heel. Supefeet corks are a thing of the past. Unless your foot is hypermobile or the cork is underbuilt you will generally have a harsher skiing experience. The footbed will limit your foot's ability to absorb energy and balance your weight. They can limit your ability to flex at the able if they don't make way for your mid foot in the flex process.

    When building a footbed it's important to consider how the entire system functions. The boot, liner, footbed, foot and lower leg. These all need to work together to provide the correct amount of support, movement/ balance, and cushion or dampening to fit your individual needs. A rigid foot will require far less support than a hypermobile one. That said, they still generally benefit from an appropriate footbed to help distribute pressure, improve circulation, and add some shock absorbtion. your hypermobile foot will require more aggressive support to help it not collapse under the pressures associated with skiing. These same footbeds would likely be painful for someone with a similar shaped but very rigid foot.

  10. #60
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    Sep 2010
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    Den/Baltimore
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    ^^Well said.

    The two people I know (brother and gf now wife) who had partially weighted cork/ultra-rigid footbeds made ended up really disliked them and ditching them. One has a rigid foot and one is hypermobile. YMMV and all that, but too rigid definitely seems to be an issue.
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

    photos

  11. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,623
    I figured they were a thing of the past because nobody sells them. I found my black pair on a rack when my brother was having some work done on his boots here in town. Pretty much the last one on the rack-- hence the $50 bones. Fact is they work the tits for me! The That's part of the trick to this is finding what works for you. Heel stabilization is definitely my biggest benefit. That being said, I've never tried the newer customs beds and I have no doubt that they are a better alternative

  12. #62
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Among Greatness All Around
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    5,161
    Quote Originally Posted by XavierD View Post
    I'm confused as to who is building footbeds that take up more volume than the stock foam insoles in your boots.

    Superfeet are built around the concept of stabilizing your heel. Supefeet corks are a thing of the past. Unless your foot is hypermobile or the cork is underbuilt you will generally have a harsher skiing experience. The footbed will limit your foot's ability to absorb energy and balance your weight. They can limit your ability to flex at the able if they don't make way for your mid foot in the flex process.

    When building a footbed it's important to consider how the entire system functions. The boot, liner, footbed, foot and lower leg. These all need to work together to provide the correct amount of support, movement/ balance, and cushion or dampening to fit your individual needs. A rigid foot will require far less support than a hypermobile one. That said, they still generally benefit from an appropriate footbed to help distribute pressure, improve circulation, and add some shock absorbtion. your hypermobile foot will require more aggressive support to help it not collapse under the pressures associated with skiing. These same footbeds would likely be painful for someone with a similar shaped but very rigid foot.
    Custom insoles can be any thickness or have a platform effect- from really thin like the stock insoles to thicker build up of the material. I have a pair of insoles (Amfit rubber type material) that have basically a bit of heal lift to them. When first made, I was in a bigger boot and the foot area also was thicker than stock footbeds. But as I downsized and got more performance fit in boots since then the toe area has been cut way down so they are pretty much very little material around the ball of the foot and the toe area.
    Last edited by RShea; 08-06-2017 at 03:22 PM.

  13. #63
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasatch
    Posts
    5,201
    I skied intuition PW in full tilt Seth for the last 5-7 years. Could not get footbed in due to top of foot shape. Well last pair packed out so I added Aline footbed under liner. Took 5 days to settle in and like that. So it can be done and worked well for me. I think it's arch shape and requires a good liner.
    I need to go to Utah.
    Utah?
    Yeah, Utah. It's wedged in between Wyoming and Nevada. You've seen pictures of it, right?

    So after 15 years we finally made it to Utah.....


    Thanks BCSAR and POWMOW Ski Patrol for rescues

    8, 17, 13, 18, 16, 18, 20, 19, 16

    2018/2019 (24/32)

  14. #64
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    in a van down by the river
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    2,773
    I have to take the foot boards out of my boots (BD Customs and Factors). My high arch just can't accommodate the extra volume that the stock boards add under foot. As for the foot beds they are a must as they provide support, and help form a solid heel pocket arch combo. the local ski shop does custom thermal ones that are great.
    I don't work and I don't save, desperate women pay my way.

  15. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
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    ^^^Did you mean your"high 'instep' cant accommodate the extra volume"?
    I can't attest to the Factors, but I owned Customs for about 3 or 4 not even half days of skiing! Those fukkers CRUSHED my instep, regardless of what I tried!

  16. #66
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    in a van down by the river
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    2,773
    Quote Originally Posted by tuco View Post
    ^^^Did you mean your"high 'instep' cant accommodate the extra volume"?
    I can't attest to the Factors, but I owned Customs for about 3 or 4 not even half days of skiing! Those fukkers CRUSHED my instep, regardless of what I tried!
    Nah, my high instep requires extra volume... I also have a wide foot and narrow heel so I am a little fucked for boots. I pulled the foot boards and run intuitions with the thin sole foot bed in my customs and they are cushy. With the foot board they are brutal. I even skip lace my work boots to open up the instep.
    I don't work and I don't save, desperate women pay my way.

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