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  1. #226
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    The next zone.. Co.
    Posts
    31
    Here is how I us my boots..

    When I get up at 5 am I tie on my k2 BOA snowboard boots nice and tight....

    Then I head down and get some bfast and coffee... On over to the shop and load and fuel all my sleds, check conditions in the area, and drive to the trail head. The people I ride with show up at the trailhead about 8am.

    On to riding, hucking sleds, and snowboard/ski until about dark. Head down to put away sleds, fuel, oil, do paperwork, and fix anything broken..

    Then head over to the bar for a beer and burger and back up to my house where I walk in and take off my k2 boa snowboard boots 12 - 14 hrs later and slip on some cush sandles... Put boots by the fire so that they dry This plan works great for me 5-6 days a week in the winter..

    From what I have seen ski boots suck to ride in. If you are learning it makes it even harder. I tell skiers that go out with me to take a watershead bag (big zip lock baggie) and change out boots once we get to the skiing. But I do like the idea about the size 18 sorels!!!

    Also if you like the seat on your sled any boot that you look into should be a boa or burton pull type system - the eye hooks on the upper part of most boots will in a season tear your seat to hell...

  2. #227
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Morrison, CO
    Posts
    464
    Quote Originally Posted by TroySmith80 View Post
    Does anyone wear regular snow boots for sledding and pack their ski boots on the sled, then switch when it's time to ski?
    Aside from all the useful advice already presented, for me, the problem is simple - the runs are fairly short, and getting back to the goods, at least here in CO at the places I go, takes 20 minutes, max. You'd certainly not want to change out _between runs_, that'd add WAY too much time per run, and the 10-20 minute "commute" just is not that bad.

    I have snowboard boots for non-skiing days, and they're bunches better, no two ways about it. However, getting used to the ski boots was not that big of a deal for me - I stand in the middle of the boot on the rail, toe pointed at the track, slid all the way up to the front of the rail. It sorta winds up there anyway, it is a fairly stable place for your foot, shrug, it works.

    Softer boots are certainly better, but the ski boots are not THAT bad.

    Plus, keeping the boots warm while wearing the soft boots would be a challenge.



    Iain

  3. #228
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Littleton
    Posts
    2,454
    Sorry to keep asking all these questions where I clearly have no idea what I'm talking about but you have all been a huge help so far...and yes, I have another one...

    Thoughts about putting a sled in the bed of a short bed pickup (6 ft bed)...??

    I have a Nissan Frontier with stiffened up rear suspension. (added a leaf, changed to better shocks...could also add airbags).

    For gas mileage, ease of driving etc I'd rather have my sled in the bed while on roadtrips (I've got a really ghetto 14ft tilt trailer I can use otherwise)

    Is this a terrible idea? I'd obviously leave my tailgate down (still leaves 2.5ft+ sticking off the end). I planned on building a sub-floor for my sled to sit on. Not sure if I should build it to wheel well height or not...and also not sure if I should extend the subfloor all the way to the end of the tailgate.

    The subfloor would at minimum give me a place to put my ramp and maybe even give me a place to put my skis/poles/random gear.

    Before I go much further on figuring out the best design for this what are all your thoughts on putting the sled in a bed...any pointers?

  4. #229
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    la la land
    Posts
    5,621
    Not a bad idea at all. PM ^^^ he has some really nice ramps forsale for loading in to your truck.
    `..><((((>`..`..`...><((((>

    "Having been Baptized by uller his frosty air now burns my soul with confirmation. I am once again pure." - frozenwater

    "once i let go of my material desires many opportunities for playing with the planet emerge. emerge - to come into being through evolution. ok back to work - i gotta pack." - Slaag Master

    "As for Flock of Seagulls, everytime that song comes up on my ipod, I turn it up- way up." - goldenboy

  5. #230
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Summit North
    Posts
    5,970
    Quote Originally Posted by TroySmith80 View Post
    Does anyone wear regular snow boots for sledding and pack their ski boots on the sled, then switch when it's time to ski?
    Jebuz!
    Sorry to hear about the fatality.
    I'll do the search to find out more.

    Troy, I run a rig sorta like Gonads.
    Put the ski boots in a bag which I strap the ski rack, use my snowboard boots (which has a speed lace system) for the approach. Once I'm in the "zone" the ski boots stay on until we are done skiing or back at the snow park. I don't always do this, but some times I feel like dumping the ski stuff off the sled to go boondocking, high-marking or hucking, at that point the ski boots come off and the snowboard boots go back on.

    Just a suggestion. This is trending toward tech talk territory.
    I started a thread about two weeks ago in TT after doing a search and coming up with this thread and a couple of other fragmented threads here and there.
    http://tinyurl.com/yaawcrg
    It's just a start, and I'm sure that contribution by Gonads, blurred not to mention others who have contributed to this thread will make it better.
    Last edited by AlpenChronicHabitual; 11-17-2009 at 10:03 AM.

  6. #231
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Dumont, Blue River
    Posts
    226
    Snr's passing was unfortunate for sure...

    I was just looking at that thread a month ago or so. bump for stoke!

    Jeffreyjim,

    My bro built a similar contraption to what you're talking about, works great. The only thing about his, the ramp is pretty steep, but it works great.

    He's FCR112 on SW, I'm sure he'd be happy to share info. He's got a ranger.

    I sell sled decks, http://www.angelfire.com/ultra2/mikesdecks/new0910.html
    and will NEVER use a trailer to get my sleds around, so I'm a big fan of having it in the bed, better snow traction, much easier parking (you can park with the freeheelers instead of the shitshow that sledders create!)
    It depends on where you ride, but it can make the crappy little parking lots MUCH more friendly.

    from JV: "Also if you like the seat on your sled any boot that you look into should be a boa or burton pull type system - the eye hooks on the upper part of most boots will in a season tear your seat to hell..."

    that's some truth right there. I hate burton, but they work better with the sled than any of the others I've used. (don't like the boa, so haven't tried them) ski boots TRASH a seat like nothing else if you're riding for real.

  7. #232
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    8.6K
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    525
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffreyJim View Post
    Sorry to keep asking all these questions where I clearly have no idea what I'm talking about but you have all been a huge help so far...and yes, I have another one...

    Thoughts about putting a sled in the bed of a short bed pickup (6 ft bed)...??

    I have a Nissan Frontier with stiffened up rear suspension. (added a leaf, changed to better shocks...could also add airbags).

    For gas mileage, ease of driving etc I'd rather have my sled in the bed while on roadtrips (I've got a really ghetto 14ft tilt trailer I can use otherwise)

    Is this a terrible idea? I'd obviously leave my tailgate down (still leaves 2.5ft+ sticking off the end). I planned on building a sub-floor for my sled to sit on. Not sure if I should build it to wheel well height or not...and also not sure if I should extend the subfloor all the way to the end of the tailgate.

    The subfloor would at minimum give me a place to put my ramp and maybe even give me a place to put my skis/poles/random gear.

    Before I go much further on figuring out the best design for this what are all your thoughts on putting the sled in a bed...any pointers?
    I own a Ford Ranger and have never had any trouble in hauling my sleds in the back. It's a snug fit, but I would prefer to haul a sled in the bed of my truck over trailering it any day. Gives you more traction, doesn't really effect gas mileage, and it's just as easy as loading and unloading a sled onto a trailer.

    I pm'ed you the info about the ramp. Let me know if you have any questions.

    If you are going to be hauling your sled in the bed of your truck be sure to buy at least a 1,000 lb. tie down strap. Don't go any lower. Your wheel wells will get banged up, but it's really not that big of a deal. If you are picky about nicks and scratches on your truck bed and tailgate, then get a trailer. Your going to beat up your bed liner a bit, but again it's all cosmetic. I would suggest reinforcing your tailgate a bit too if you can. Over time mine has bent a little, but is still functional. If your sled has reverse it's even easier to take it off the truck. If not, not a huge deal. Only takes one dude to load and unload.

    I've fit widetrack work sleds in the back as well as mountain sleds. They all fit in a pickup. I've found that it works best when you bend the skis up and have them resting on the front of your truck bed. Gives you several more inches of space and brings the weight of the sled more towards the center of the truck.

  8. #233
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Posts
    108
    Quote Originally Posted by backcountryislife View Post
    Hey, I sold your decks last winter (or tried too, the market is/was dead here). I used one of your expandable decks all winter on my personal truck. Was using it as demo/promo. Tried to raise some interest up at the snowparks and definitely got some, but nobody ponied up to actually buy one. Is Benjamin carrying them still this year?

    Great product though, i sure enjoyed having it. The expandable sides and no beavertail is the only way to go!

    I see on the pictures in the link you just posted that you've been making further developments and changes.

    FYI guys, he's right. It's fantastic not to have to tow a trailer, and being able to park in a small space, or turn around on the highway. If you want to carry 2 sleds w/o a trailer, check out his decks. And if you're around Central Oregon, I'm sure i can get one for ya!

    Quote Originally Posted by ^^^ View Post
    I pm'ed you the info about the ramp. Let me know if you have any questions.
    I'm interested too, and probably lots of lurkers, why don't you go ahead and post it up. Maybe better to put it in the thread in tech talk though. [ame="https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php?t=174128"]HERE[/ame].

  9. #234
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Dumont, Blue River
    Posts
    226
    troysmith, I'm not mikey, I'm just a guy selling his decks in CO.

    Same market here, everybody likes thew, everybody wants them, nobody wants to PAY for them!!

    He's made some big changes in the last few years, they're SIIIICk now!

    I just brought a few back to CO from CdA for JP a few weeks ago, wish I would have brought a few more back!

    Anybody in CO that wants to buy a full lotus deck, let me know, I have one for sale (expandable sides, plastic deck, 11' ramp)

  10. #235
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    The next zone.. Co.
    Posts
    31
    I am looking to get a sled deck and I am going to give you a call. I need one for a 8' bed on a chevy 2004 four door.. I was looking at getting a 4place enclosed but my little bro now has 2 girls under 2 years old so I may be by myself or looking for partners more this year. Kaleb can you pm me your phone number as I dont have it any more. Thanks!!!

  11. #236
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Colorado Cartel HQ
    Posts
    16,048
    I still don't understand the brand loyalty towards a sled manufacturer some people have, even though their sled is constantly grenading. Sleds aren't supposed to blow up all the time. It's also funny to me that people know a certain brand blows up way more than others, yet they've still decided that's what they want.
    Follow me on Instagram

    brett.mcnary

  12. #237
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Morrison, CO
    Posts
    464
    shrug. I don't get it, either.

    I'd be interested to know total 800cc mountain sleds sold from ~2000-present from all manufacturers and try to get an idea of _percentage_ of failures; some of those who drank the SkiDoo koolaid claim that the propensity of 800cc Skidoos blowing up is perception more than actual unreliability, citing "more sold" than the other three (two, really).

    I personally suspect those numbers would expose the ugly truth, but whatever.

    I'm happy with my normally-reliable Skidoos, for now. When it is time, though.....dunno. Maybe buy a blown up RevXP and jam a rebuilt 700 into it? Dunno, but there are PLENTY of 700cc Skidoo motors out there (and Cat/Polaris) with 5000+++ miles on them. I suppose that my tune will change when I really find a power-shortcoming, but I've not found it yet - as I get my rear suspension dialed in, I'm having fewer and fewer issues getting two people around.

    Just put a 156" track on the 700. Will have lower gears next Monday. My sled might lose some top speed, but I don't care.

    I don't get it, either.




    Iain (mmmmmmmM1000.....)

  13. #238
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    1,496
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffreyJim View Post
    Thoughts about putting a sled in the bed of a short bed pickup (6 ft bed)...??
    I'm interested to know more as well. Carried an M7 153" on the back of a Dodge Dakota all last season, sat in there for pretty much 4 months straight. No extra reinforcement anywhere, but don't seem to have caused any damage/sagging anywhere.

    Also, kook question, is it totally ok to just drop the sled off the back when unloading? I suspect the sled faces much more force on the trail than dropping it so all good?

  14. #239
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    flat and shallow
    Posts
    72
    ^
    What I've done for years is get in the truck lift both skis push sled mostly off the truck set parking brake on sled and drive away . Sled off truck . Sometimes the skis/carbides will catch and you just end up pulling the sled . Lift both skis another couple inches just to the point of teetering. Drive away .

    Today I went up and did a road ride to my slope to hike and heard rattling I didnt check it . Got back to the parking lot and and my pull start had fallen off . The bolts vibrated off . I did the strap on the clutch to get it started . It was easy , never did it before.

  15. #240
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    The bottom of LCC
    Posts
    5,084
    Quote Originally Posted by robnow View Post
    Also, kook question, is it totally ok to just drop the sled off the back when unloading? I suspect the sled faces much more force on the trail than dropping it so all good?
    I'm pretty sure it's fine. The suspension should be designed to take more abuse than that. But...for $100 you can get a folding aluminum ramp which makes loading and unloading easier, then you aren't relying on snowbanks (we don't always have those here).

  16. #241
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    1,496
    Quote Originally Posted by dfinn View Post
    I'm pretty sure it's fine. The suspension should be designed to take more abuse than that. But...for $100 you can get a folding aluminum ramp which makes loading and unloading easier, then you aren't relying on snowbanks (we don't always have those here).
    Well of course I got a ramp, just a pain in the ass for unloading without reverse, and more curious about it than anything.

  17. #242
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Zion
    Posts
    339
    I can't believe nobody else uses these. I have a boot sole length of 318mm, and the villager XXL is a perfect fit. If you have really big ski boots, you might be out of luck. These overshoes are perfect for so many reasons. The rubber soles provide unreal traction, so your not slipping and sliding on your running boards. They also protect your ski boots from the devastation caused by running boards. They keep your boots warmer and drier. Extremely easy to put on and off. THe overshoes weigh one pound, and fold flat allowing you to store them anywhere. For the last 4 years, these overshoes have been one of the most important pieces of snowmobiling equipment I have. If you are frustrated with sled skiing because of your hard shell ski boots, you need to buy these. You can thank me later.

    http://www.overshoe.com/recreational...tail.php?s=VIS

    oh yah, $40 bucks



  18. #243
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Bend, OR
    Posts
    108
    I just got some used scarpa matrix boots from craigslist. They have a vibram sole that covers the arch (not just toe/heel). SHould work pretty well. The overshoe looks like a good idea too. My boot soles are typically 330-340mm though. Wonder if they'd work.

  19. #244
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Littleton
    Posts
    2,454
    Not to beat a dead horse or anything but I'm having second thoughts on the sled I'm looking at.

    04 Summit 800 "X". 3500 miles. New motor. (Very) well maintained. Ridden by a middle aged lady (buddies wife). $4k.

    On a side note, I'd be buying from one of the guys I'd be learning from and he's agreed to work on/fix whatever I DO break. (These guys build custom sleds so yes, they have the mechanical aptitude to fix anything that might go wrong...all I pay for is parts)

    If it's overpriced what do you all think its worth? Anyone? Bueller? Anyone?...Bueller...???

    Yes, I'm sticking Doo because I can't afford to get any of the newer Cat or Polaris stuff (2005 is as new as I can afford) and I feel confident that if I'm looking 03-05 Doo stuff was much better (Rev) than the competition. Maybe I've been falsely convinced by some sled heads of this theory though...


    Thanks to those that have already commented/helped (BCSS, Kidwoo etc)

  20. #245
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    la la land
    Posts
    5,621
    A little on the high side, but with an offer to fix things that break it's worth it.
    `..><((((>`..`..`...><((((>

    "Having been Baptized by uller his frosty air now burns my soul with confirmation. I am once again pure." - frozenwater

    "once i let go of my material desires many opportunities for playing with the planet emerge. emerge - to come into being through evolution. ok back to work - i gotta pack." - Slaag Master

    "As for Flock of Seagulls, everytime that song comes up on my ipod, I turn it up- way up." - goldenboy

  21. #246
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    CB!
    Posts
    2,972
    Just bought an '05 M7 153" with 1700 miles for $3200. I wouldn't pay more than probably 3k for that sled.

  22. #247
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    4,131
    Quote Originally Posted by PROVO View Post
    I can't believe nobody else uses these. I have a boot sole length of 318mm, and the villager XXL is a perfect fit. If you have really big ski boots, you might be out of luck. These overshoes are perfect for so many reasons. The rubber soles provide unreal traction, so your not slipping and sliding on your running boards. They also protect your ski boots from the devastation caused by running boards. They keep your boots warmer and drier. Extremely easy to put on and off. THe overshoes weigh one pound, and fold flat allowing you to store them anywhere. For the last 4 years, these overshoes have been one of the most important pieces of snowmobiling equipment I have. If you are frustrated with sled skiing because of your hard shell ski boots, you need to buy these. You can thank me later.

    http://www.overshoe.com/recreational...tail.php?s=VIS

    oh yah, $40 bucks


    Nice Provo! Thanks.

    do you find the 10" model fits over the top of your ski boots or doesn't it matter cause your ski boots are under your pants?

    I am getting me some of those, seems like a perfect solution.
    "A man on foot, on horseback or on a bicycle will see more, feel more, enjoy more in one mile than the motorized tourists can in a hundred miles."
    Edward Abbey (Desert Solitaire)

  23. #248
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    A little piece of paradise
    Posts
    37
    [QUOTE=JeffreyJim;2627224]Not to beat a dead horse or anything but I'm having second thoughts on the sled I'm looking at.

    04 Summit 800 "X". 3500 miles. New motor. (Very) well maintained. Ridden by a middle aged lady (buddies wife). $4k.

    If it is o miles on the new motor, i think its a good deal. If its a crate motor or stock rings, do a top end rebuild sooner than later and put better rings in there. I think brp recomends a top end rebuild after 1800 miles??. and if your buddies gonna help do any repairs.... the 800 HO motors have there issues but I love riding the rev. riding my buddies cats and polaris are like riding an old boot. If the other brands came out with a rider forward platform i'd seriously consider them. brp are a bunch of fuck heads.

  24. #249
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Whistler
    Posts
    1,017
    I'll be honest, I really don't mind sledding in my ski boots (plug boots with vibram soles screwed on). Granted I'm certainly not the world's greatest sledder but I'm capable. I also don't really play around much, use it mainly for access, but as anyone out here can attest, access out here ain't fire roads...
    Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Powder

  25. #250
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    not here, kansas
    Posts
    299
    I just mount old binders to the running boards of the sled, my din is set at 8 so I just pull out one leg as I'm riding if needed.

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