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  1. #1
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    coloRADo
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    The Home-made Pizza thread

    Aight, haven't found anything like this around. I want to have a thread where we can discuss home made pizza, ingredients, techniques, post pics and vote on the best pie, ask questions & find advice.

    My very first question - does anybody know of a good high-gluten Type 00 flour supplier in/around the Denver/Boulder area? I was thinking of walking in at Protos in Boulder and asking them if they can hook me up with a 50lb bag of their flour, but would prefer knowing a good supplier in the vicinity.

    Also looking for San Marzano tomatoes in town, I can't find a store that carries them!!! I am going to grow my own this summer, but want to find ready-ones for the time being.

    And just to get the thread started:

    (stolen from wikimedia)

    Here's my basic dough recipe:
    1000grams high-gluten flour (11.5-12%)
    650ml luke-warm water (I've been going with 65% hydration lately)
    7grams Dry Yeast
    pinch of salt
    tbps of brown sugar

    So I usually start my pizza dough the night before using it. I basically mix the yeast, the water, and the sugar in a bowl and let it sit for a few minutes. Mix the salt with the flour, dump the yeast-water in, and mix & knead the dough for a good 20 minutes. Rub the dough in some olive oil & I let it rise for 30 minutes before wrapping it in ceran wrap & letting the dough 'mature' in the fridge for 12-18hours. The next day I pull the dough out and let it warm up to room-temperature, then let it rise 2-6hours depending on how rushed I am.
    Making pizza Thursday night so I'll have some actual pics of my pies

    Let's get this thread goin!
    -b

  2. #2
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    I usually add warm Guiness and dried herbs into the dough.
    Finding the right Mozzarella is key, NO KRAFT PRODUCTS!!!
    Oven @ 500 on a stone.
    StokePimpin' ain't easy

  3. #3
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    For retail flour, go with King Arthur/Sir Lancelot...fairly readily available.

    Another excellent tomato sauce is Hirzel/Dei Fratelli out of Toledo OH. While not a San Marzano variety, it is local production using vine-ripened product; far far better than anything else american I've found.

    For a limited time only, here's my secret sauce recipe:

    Crush garlic together with anchovy or anchovy paste. Place in sauce pan of warm extra-virgin olive oil and heat gently until garlic begins to sizzle and get aromatic - do not brown. Add fresh chopped oregano (and basil or other herbs as you see fit), and stir quickly. Let herbs aromate in oil briefly, then add tomato puree. Reduce heat to low and stir occasionally.
    Living vicariously through myself.

  4. #4
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    I've been using King Arthur's bread flour for my pizza dough and yeah, it's definitely a great flour! But at $5 for a 5lbs bag, it's on the expensive side, plus not as refined as Type 00
    Mozzarella is definitely key, shame on whoever uses kraft shredded mozzarella I think tomatoes are THE key ingredient besides dough, though. They make or break your pizza!
    I'll try the Hirzel/Dei Fratelli ones, thanks for the tip! I do usually get whole peeled tomatoes over paste though, and simmer them in abundant olive oil & minced garlic - I'll have to try the anchovy paste idea!

  5. #5
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    Ricotta, garlic, porcini mushrooms, and EV olive oil would do it for me.


    If we're doing tomatoes, make them plump and make the cheese buffala mozzarella. Toss in prosciutto and/or pancetta.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    Santa Barbara
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    I usually keep it simple with pizza. For sauce, I usually dump the San Marzano tomatoes in a bowl, crush them by hand, add them to a pot with some olive oil and cook them down a bit (I don't have a 1000+ degree oven at home, but if you have access to one pre-cooking the sauce isn't necessary), remove from heat and season with oregano, salt, and often I'll ass some red chili flakes as well.

    As far as cooking the pie, I've found a large pre-heated cast iron pan turns out a better product than a pizza stone. I'll crank the oven as hot as it will go, brush the dough with a little olive oil, par cook really quickly, remove and add the sauce buffala mozz (another trick if you are in the USA, the buff mozz is never as fresh as it should be and can soak up a lot of brine, so I'll slice and let the slices rest b/w some paper towells, prior to cooking, preventing a soggy pizza). Fire it till it begins to take on some nice char and the cheese is melted. Made an excellent one a couple weeks ago with sausage, pancetta, buffala mozz, and finished it with a big pile of fresh arugula and olive oil after it came out of the oven =

  7. #7
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    Hmmmm.. sounds good. One of my chef friend's recipe is to cook the pizza on a weber grill. You toss the flatened dough on the grill first, then take it off, add your sauce and fixings, then put it back on. It's a GREAT way to cook it and a fun evening with friends. Can't wait for BBQ season...
    Screw the net, Surf the backcountry!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    332
    The big question is where to get a hold of some mozz curd so you can make your own. I have done this in commercial kitchens and it makes a pretty big difference on top of some reggiano or grana padano. King auther does the job for me, yeah it's $$$.Fuck now I'm hungry.

  9. #9
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    im definitely a noob at making pizza, but i did do some baking when i was going to culinary school. had a lot of fun with dough. definitely want to start playing around with it.

    anyway, cant give any denver/boulder stores that sell san marzano tomatoes, but heres a link for a store in nj that i used to go to a lot. http://www.corradosmarket.com/Store/...x?CategoryID=4 scroll down a bit and you'll see san marzano tomato products. theyre canned, but hopefully thats what you were looking for. dont know where you can get fresh ones around here.

    PS - i was playing around with some leftover dough at the restaurant and made a pie with basil, sage, sliced roma tomatoes and fontina cheese. i ended up stretching the dough too thin, but the aromas from the pie were promising. didnt get to taste it though because the thing just fell apart.

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddy View Post
    Hmmmm.. sounds good. One of my chef friend's recipe is to cook the pizza on a weber grill. You toss the flatened dough on the grill first, then take it off, add your sauce and fixings, then put it back on. It's a GREAT way to cook it and a fun evening with friends. Can't wait for BBQ season...
    thats how we do it at the restaurant. not on a webber, but precook the dough on the grill and then make pizzas to order.

    Quote Originally Posted by snowswine View Post
    The big question is where to get a hold of some mozz curd so you can make your own. I have done this in commercial kitchens and it makes a pretty big difference on top of some reggiano or grana padano.
    yeah, we made fresh mozzarella in class, night and day difference. i can email my instructor to find out where the curd might be available.
    Last edited by AbsolutStoli; 04-29-2008 at 09:38 PM.
    "If you are not nervous about your passion, you are not passionate enough about it."

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...tionaries3.jpg

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    mmmmm, home-made pizza is delicious.

    I haven't made my own crust since high school, but back then my sister and I used to make whole wheat dough that was really excellent.

    In terms of toppings, I'm allergic to tomatoes so I've had to experiment.

    Favorites:
    olive oil, fontina, caramelized onions, granny smith apples, grilled chicken

    balsamic vinegar brushed on the crust, mozzarella, roasted veggies (combo of carrots, onions, sweet potatoes, fingerling potatoes, garlic cloves), fresh ricotta, basil

  11. #11
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    Guess I´m a cheater:

    Dough: Flour, yeast, salt, water. The flour I use is just normal flour, but Norwegian flour is high in gluten, so no problem there. I use quite a lot of yeast, and just make the pizzas immediately after throwing the dough together. Precooking the dough is key. The oven should be at full throttle.

    Sauce: One box of canned tomatoes, one tin of reduced tomatoes, a lot of olive oil, a lot of oregano, and some black pepper.

    Toppings range from marinated beef (fennel seeds, powdered ginger, allspice, chili) to the legendary bacon and egg pizza. (Tomato sauce, random cheese, a few strips of raw bacon and a raw egg in the middle. Makes a great breakfast.)
    simen@downskis.com DOWN SKIS

  12. #12
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    I find the simplest pizzas are often the best ones. Give me a thin cracker-like crust, a touch of tomato paste mixed with an even smaller touch of ketchup (sweetens it up), a thin dusting of mozzerella, fresh basil, fresh tomatoes, a light dash of extra virgin olive oil...et viola!


  13. #13
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    Santa Barbara
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbsolutStoli View Post
    anyway, cant give any denver/boulder stores that sell san marzano tomatoes, but heres a link for a store in nj that i used to go to a lot. http://www.corradosmarket.com/Store/...x?CategoryID=4 scroll down a bit and you'll see san marzano tomato products. theyre canned, but hopefully thats what you were looking for. dont know where you can get fresh ones around here.
    When looking for real San Marzano tomatoes beware of the imposter brands that aren't actually DOP San Marzano tomatoes. For example the brand name "San Marzano Tomatoes" pictured below aren't the real deal.

  14. #14
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    Charcoal grill with a stone is nice for getting that ripping high heat.

    Last time my dad was in town, we made a whole wheat dough similar to the OPs recipe. One of the pies was white truffle oil, Gran Padana, Asiago, Regiano, Prosciutto and a really good aged hard salami. It was heart attackingly delicious.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  15. #15
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    I like where this thread is going Staaaaarving for some good pizza now!

    I'm definitely with you Ripzalot - the simplest pizza usually turns out to be the best! When my friends load their pizzas with a metric ton of toppings, I go with good tomato sauce, good mozzarella, sliced cocktail tomatoes (cherry tomatoes), and some fresh basil...

    As for my cooking procedure, this is what I do:
    I have two different methods, depending on what I want. For thin crust Napolitana pizza (I make those usually round) I use about a 200gram dough-ball and stretch it out to ~14" diameter (letting the dough mature overnight really gives the gluten a pop!), put it on a pizza peel, top it off, and throw it on a pizza stone in the oven pre-heated to 550F. Less than 10 minutes cooking and the pizza is as perfect as it can get in a home-oven. I like the grill idea, I had read that somewhere else before, with the variation of using a pizza stone ON the grill. Gonna have to try it soon.

    My other variation is deep-dish "Pizza al taglio" (the usual kind of pizza you buy at the corner store for lunch in Italy). There I use a 300-400gram dough-ball for a big pizza. I oil the pan well, stretch the pizza out, oil the top slightly, and let sit for 15-20minutes to let the dough spring up again. Then I cook at highest heat in the oven until golden, remove from the pan and let it cool on a wire-rack to release moisture. Once cooled, top it off, back in the oven at ~400F until the mozzarella is bubbling.

  16. #16
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    Great thread...keep it coming.

    So hungry for GOOD pizza right now.
    ‎"Powder snow skiing is not fun. It's life, fully lived, life lived in a blaze of reality." -Dolores LaChapelle

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    280
    /bump

    Anyone got a dough recipe to share?

    Nice to bake pies when the temps outside come down. House gets a bit warm in the summer when it's already warm out.

    This is my thinner crust dough fwiw...

    Turn on oven to 350 (heat for a few minutes to warm up for dough rising).

    Combine:
    1 1/2 cup hot tap water
    1 tbsp brown sugar
    - dissolve brown sugar
    1 Envelope Active Dry Yeast
    - stir in

    Turn off oven.

    After 5 minutes, stir to make sure yeast is broken up

    After another 10 minutes for a total proofing time of 15 minutes, dump yeast mixture in to Kitchen Aid bowl along with:
    1 1/2 tsp Salt
    2 tbsp Olive oil

    Turn on mixer to speed 2

    Add:

    1 cup bread flour

    then add

    2 tbsp of Crisco butter flavored shortening

    then add

    3 cup bread flour a cup at a time

    Let dough mix until it cleans the side of the bowl.

    Shape dough in to dough ball and place dough in large olive oil coated bowl covered with cellophane wrap and let dough rise for 75 minutes in warm oven.

    Remove from oven and separate into four dough balls - weigh and divide.

    Cover and let dough rise for another 20 minutes

    At this time place stone in oven and turn on oven to 450 so stone has time to come up to temperature.

    Roll out first dough ball and fork every inch (prevents bubbling).

    Add tomato sauce & toppings
    - thin mushrooms(put on top so moisture evaporates and doesn't make a soggy pizza)
    - small chunks of olive
    - thin roma tomatoes
    - sliced pepperoccini
    - pepperoni
    - thin bell pepper
    - 4-way cheese (6oz jack, 6oz prov, 16oz mozz, 6oz romano)

    Bake for 10-15 min or until toppings bubble in middle of pizza.

    Remove and sprinkle with light bit of Parmesan cheese while hot. Will allow cheese to melt.

    Scarf.

    Tomato sauce:
    16 oz can of diced tomatoes, chopped and strained
    2 cloves crushed garlic
    2 tbsp chopped onion
    2 tsp thyme
    1 tbsp olive oil
    1/4 tsp kosher salt
    2 tsp oregano
    2 tsp basil
    Huck the Joneses.

  18. #18
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    Apr 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bernardo View Post
    So I usually start my pizza dough the night before using it. I basically mix the yeast, the water, and the sugar in a bowl and let it sit for a few minutes. Mix the salt with the flour, dump the yeast-water in, and mix & knead the dough for a good 20 minutes. Rub the dough in some olive oil & I let it rise for 30 minutes before wrapping it in ceran wrap & letting the dough 'mature' in the fridge for 12-18hours. The next day I pull the dough out and let it warm up to room-temperature, then let it rise 2-6hours depending on how rushed I am.
    Making pizza Thursday night so I'll have some actual pics of my pies

    Let's get this thread goin!
    -b
    I've noticed that dough takes on a nice flavor after sitting in the fridge a few days to ferment.
    Huck the Joneses.

  19. #19
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    Step one: go to local pizza store and buy raw dough for $2

    Grill directly on grates

    flip, add toppings and cover

    Mangiamo

  20. #20
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    Great thread. I love pesto pizzas but only saw a slight reference from the tomato allergic poster about non-tomato sauce pies.

    Are pesto and alfredo ( light ) pizzas just too California here. And I ain't from Cali just not always loving the red sauce.

    I will definitely try some of the dough recipes as I have been of the buy the dough at the pizza shop variety for a while.

    I have done dutch oven pizzas a bunch on the river. As well as a wicked good foccacia bread made from pizza dough.
    Quote Originally Posted by skuba View Post
    you can let it free and be as stupid as possible


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  21. #21
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    This a pretty informative (and lengthy) guide...

    http://www.varasanos.com/PizzaRecipe.htm

    Anybody got any info on creating a sponge? We've got several bakeries around here, so I was thinking I might just stop by one of them and see what they can set me up with.

    I wonder if I can get my grill up to 800 degrees?
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  22. #22
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    Apr 2008
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    I've not grilled pizza before but heard of folks getting good results with said method.

    One thing I'd like to try next is to cold-smoke mozzarella. I had this once on a pizza and it was killer.

    Putting your own dough together is simple once you do it a few times... and cheap. A mixer with a dough hook helps but you can get similar results by hand. My problem early on was using too much dough and making a thick leather-like slab for the crust. I split the dough and then added some shortening to soften the finished result a little. Also, if you use a stone and don't roll your dough too thick, you don't have to par-bake your crust.

    I usually make up a batch of dough, split it into four dough balls and use two of the dough balls for that meal and then, over the course of the next few days, make pizzas with the left over dough balls and topping or split one of the dough balls in two and prepare calzone. The stuff freezes well too. Put a ball in a zip lock with some olive oil and stick it into the freezer. When ready, pull it out and place it in the fridge the day before to slowly thaw - will be ready the next day.

    Get a stone and get your hands dirty with this once and you'll be hooked.
    Last edited by somegeek; 10-25-2008 at 02:46 PM.
    Huck the Joneses.

  23. #23
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    one of my favorite pizzas my wife makes is pesto with shrimp goat cheese and kalamta olives

  24. #24
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    heres one I made in a tent in the middle of nowhere
    Its not that I suck at spelling, its that I just don't care

  25. #25
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    Dec 2006
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    im working my way thru my second 50# bag of flour at $15

    its just plain cheap costco flour, but adding olive oil,herbs, and (i know this is not part of any recipe) about 1/4 oatmeal, mixed in a bread machine as dough, but cooked on a hot stone, has produced some great crusts if you like thin and a little crunchy. and we have been using fresh tomatoes and fresh herbs. very good value for the coming depression
    picador

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