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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    7

    P-tex falling out?

    I have a few base shots right along the edges of my skis. Everytime I p-tex these wounds the p-tex falls out next day I go skiing. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    1,449
    You need to either get the skis patched by someone who knows what they are doing (filling a gouge with epoxy is not a patch)
    Or find a base weld material called co-polymer it will stick to metal and base material
    Ptex repair candles/sticks do not stick to metal
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  3. #3
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    Here's what I did today:

    1. Clean the edges of the gouge and remove any loose material
    2. Sand the core shot to roughen it for better adhesion
    3. Get a cheap soldering iron to melt in the repair material
    4. Melt in a layer of copolymer/metalgrip - this is a more rubbery material that adheres well to coreshots and metal
    5. Use a metal scraper to press the copolymer into the gouge and hold until cool
    6. Sand the copolymer to roughen (this may not be necessary but can't hurt)
    7. Melt in ptex (the kind that's meant to be melted in, not the drip candle kind)
    8. As before, press your metal scraper onto the repair to push it into the hole and hold until cool
    9. Once cool, carefully trim most of the excess ptex with a utility knife
    10. Use your metal scraper to scrape away remaining excess ptex
    Last edited by D(C); 11-21-2012 at 11:07 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Metal grip is key for edge core shots. Ptex doesn't stick to metal very well.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
    Here's what I did today:

    1. Clean the edges of the gouge and remove any loose material
    2. Sand the core show to roughen it for better adhesion
    3. Get a cheap soldering iron to melt in the repair material
    4. Melt in a layer of copolymer/metalgrip - this is a more rubbery material that adheres well to coreshots and metal
    5. Use a metal scraper to press the copolymer into the gouge and hold until cool
    6. Sand the copolymer to roughen (this may not be necessary but can't hurt)
    7. Melt in ptex (the kind that's meant to be melted in, not the drip candle kind)
    8. As before, press your metal scraper onto the repair to push it into the hole and hold until cool
    9. Once cool, carefully trim most of the excess ptex with a utility knife
    10. Use your metal scraper to scrape away remaining excess ptex
    a short cut is just to use copolymer. It holds up pretty well. Not as hard are normal ptex but harder than drip stuff. After a while 10 days ~ it will have worn away a bit so a thin layer of ptex can be applied when your doing other none coreshot repairs.






    Its pricey but for no. 9 I use a base planner


    I bought one of these

    But if you only have a small amount of excess it would be crazy to use it. Tried it once and did damage very quickly.
    Mrs. Dougw- "I can see how one of your relatives could have been killed by an angry mob."

  6. #6
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    Anybody ever use just use slow set epoxy instead of copolymer followed by melt in p-tex reason being I usually go with what I got kicking around ?

    If the OP is using Drip candles they are a huge waste of time even if they don't pull out the material wears out pretty quick

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    Anybody ever use just use slow set epoxy instead of copolymer followed by melt in p-tex reason being I usually go with what I got kicking around ?

    If the OP is using Drip candles they are a huge waste of time even if they don't pull out the material wears out pretty quick
    The heart actuated adhesive copolymer (metal grip) works as a 'primer' between the UHMW polyethylene base repair material and dissimilar materials, like core, metal edges and epoxies. Welding the poly to epoxy will not bond as well as to the copolymer. I've just used the epoxy flush to the base in small areas along the edge with good results. Wax won't adhere to the epoxy though.

  8. #8
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    Aug 2009
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    I'll weigh in with one slight tangent statement here. After a lot of tries and failures, I've determine that the clear stuff just doesn't hack it. Melt in, metal grip, even the super hard stuff cracks after a few days. It holds, but if asthetics is the motive for using clear, it seems the effort is nill even in the short run. I've managed to do some pretty good looking repairs where the repair blended almost perfectly only to see things change and discolor over time.

    This is, of course, following or nearly following the 10 steps that D(C) suggested.
    I demoed the TECH TALK JONG! pro model this spring and their performance was unparalleled which is good because I ski in a wedge most of the time - bendtheski, 2011

  9. #9
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    yeah I have read the theory behind copolymer and it is suposed to be better but I don't have any. Apparently people have used epoxy only as the repair SO the real question is how well does melt-in ptex stick to epoxy ?

  10. #10
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    Jan 2009
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    Metal grip, a little of it will last you a stupid long time.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DougW View Post
    Its pricey but for no. 9 I use a base planner

    I bought one of these

    But if you only have a small amount of excess it would be crazy to use it. Tried it once and did damage very quickly.
    I have both that skivisions planer and a surform scraper -- I use the surform 99% of the time. The trick to avoiding damage with the surform is to press very lightly, and make sure the smoother edge (the top edge in the linked photo) is on the inside of the ski -- on the base -- and not the jagged edge (the bottom edge in the linked photo). Works great for removing excess ptex from a repair, and I can get a fairly smooth base with just the surform tool alone.

    Then I use a metal scraper for final cleanup, and a steel brush to try to impart some structure to the repair.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Missoula, MT
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    I just use baseweld and a torch.
    Cleaning up the edges of the wound with a razor or exactoknife is key, as well as cleaning it up to get any foreign matter out.
    Pressing down with you metal scraper also seems to be key. I put something between the scraper and my hand so I don't burn myself.
    If possible, try to do everything at room temp and dry.

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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skirotica View Post
    I'll weigh in with one slight tangent statement here. After a lot of tries and failures, I've determine that the clear stuff just doesn't hack it. Melt in, metal grip, even the super hard stuff cracks after a few days. It holds, but if asthetics is the motive for using clear, it seems the effort is nill even in the short run. I've managed to do some pretty good looking repairs where the repair blended almost perfectly only to see things change and discolor over time.

    This is, of course, following or nearly following the 10 steps that D(C) suggested.
    The metal grip melts and browns at a lower temperature than UHMW polyethylene. Hot air guns are another option.

    Regarding heat and metal grip, check out this post from a few years ago from the ptex repair - FAIL thread.
    Last edited by Alpinord; 11-21-2012 at 11:27 AM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    Anybody ever use just use slow set epoxy instead of copolymer followed by melt in p-tex reason being I usually go with what I got kicking around ?
    I've tried this and haven't had great results. The ptex seems to pull out pretty easily, often at the point where I'm trimming the excess.

    I've found that in general if the repair can survive having the excess trimmed with a boxcutter without pulling out, it should stay in pretty well.

  15. #15
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    Great thread. Ive had the same problem for years.

    Trying to find it online. Is this the stuff?

    http://www.premierindustrial.net/products/xb2500.html

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    73
    Quote Originally Posted by D(C) View Post
    I've tried this and haven't had great results. The ptex seems to pull out pretty easily, often at the point where I'm trimming the excess.

    I've found that in general if the repair can survive having the excess trimmed with a boxcutter without pulling out, it should stay in pretty well.
    Do you trim from the middle out? I never have them pull out while trimming access material. Heating the surrounding area with a hair dryer or heat gun also helps a lot with bonding. I would say a good 30 minutes minimum to cool before you trim it.

  17. #17
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    Feb 2009
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    It's all about the hot PTEX gun which can be loaded with a variety of substances. The drips are tough to stick.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    I have both that skivisions planer and a surform scraper -- I use the surform 99% of the time. The trick to avoiding damage with the surform is to press very lightly, and make sure the smoother edge (the top edge in the linked photo) is on the inside of the ski -- on the base -- and not the jagged edge (the bottom edge in the linked photo). Works great for removing excess ptex from a repair, and I can get a fairly smooth base with just the surform tool alone.

    Then I use a metal scraper for final cleanup, and a steel brush to try to impart some structure to the repair.
    You had more patience that I did. I usually do a lot of repairs at same time , couple big means a fair number of little repairs so using the plane tip to tail works for me.
    Mrs. Dougw- "I can see how one of your relatives could have been killed by an angry mob."

  19. #19
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    If you're just looking to git-er done, take a lighter and heat up the area first. Light your p-tex, add more heat to the edge, then drip it in there. Skis don't last forever anyways.

  20. #20
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  21. #21
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    Jun 2007
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    ^^^ that works.

    Tognar sells copolymer online. It works. I don't San between layers and use a heat gun and a heated putty knife. The ptex will melt into te copolymer. Tough part is ptex has a higher melt temperature.

    For big edge core shots I prefer to use actual base material. You can get this pretty cheap from most shops that do repair. Clean out the core shot ago you have smooth, straight edges. Cut a piece of base material to match. You want it tight, so trim slowly. Use slow set epoxy on both pieces and pound in with a mallet. Lay down a piece of wax paper and metal scrapers. Clamp in place to create equal pressure. Wait a day, remove clamps, chip off excess epoxy. Go ski. Done right, this will last several seasons and is stronger than any ptex fix.

    Or just fill it with wax and forget about it.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ottime View Post
    ^^^ that works.

    Tough part is ptex has a higher melt temperature.

    Putting an overlay of ptex on top of copolymer is a bit tricky. That is why on a small core shot just use copolymer and then overlay later when snow has taken just the right amount of copoly to do a nice overlay.
    Mrs. Dougw- "I can see how one of your relatives could have been killed by an angry mob."

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    592
    Quote Originally Posted by Ottime View Post
    ^^^ that works.



    For big edge core shots I prefer to use actual base material. You can get this pretty cheap from most shops that do repair. Clean out the core shot ago you have smooth, straight edges. Cut a piece of base material to match. You want it tight, so trim slowly. Use slow set epoxy on both pieces and pound in with a mallet. Lay down a piece of wax paper and metal scrapers. Clamp in place to create equal pressure. Wait a day, remove clamps, chip off excess epoxy. Go ski. Done right, this will last several seasons and is stronger than any ptex fix.
    This is by far the best method. Secret to a tight fit is cut them(patch and base) at the same time, pretty much looks like a die cut. I use wood to clamp against unless your doing a "quick patch" where you flame the scraper and actually melt the base material(Yeah its scary,hopefully your melting just the patch). A sharp scraper should be all you need to remove excess, working from the center of patch out to ends.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Chamonix
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    I got some of that Toko base repair powder years ago. It's only a minor step up from drip candles, so not really that great for its intended purpose. But I do have a good use for it in coreshot repair. I mix up my epoxy (12 or 24 hour), then sprinkle some of the Toko powder in there and mix for another 30-60 seconds over heat (I just place my mixing card on a hot water bottle and let the heat come through). This seems to make for an excellent filler, either on its own or as a baselayer for a normal base weld.

    For shallower repairs or top layers I have a butane soldering iron with a 10mm chisel tip, used with ptex ribbons, by far the best affordable home option I've tried.

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