Notices

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    in the know
    Posts
    8,339

    Could someone smarter than me (FUZZ) explain this?


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Sector 7G
    Posts
    5,652
    The simple answer is that they boosted the sensitivity of the sensor in the part of the visible spectrum where most astronomical objects emit light. By doing this, as opposed to increasing the sensitivity to the entire visible spectrum, they are able to better control iso noise in the final output. What I don't know is if they did this via hardware or software.
    This is the worst pain EVER!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    in the know
    Posts
    8,339
    So is it a one hit wonder? Is it ONLY good for astrophotography?
    Brought to you by Carl's Jr.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Sector 7G
    Posts
    5,652
    Quote Originally Posted by systemoverblow'd View Post
    So is it a one hit wonder? Is it ONLY good for astrophotography?
    I don't know that.

    Edit: So after doing a little reading, I would guess that since they removed the IR filter (that's how they boots the sensitivity to the Hydrogen-α line), that it's functionality as a "regular" camera would be somewhat limited. The previous model (the 20Da) rendered a red tint to "normal" unfiltered exposures. That's logical since the IR filter blocks some red wave lengths in addition to IR. Normally we don't notice since the cameras software compensates for this in the final image output. Color correction could be achieved thru post processing (setting the white balance) or by using an infrared filter over the end of the lens.

    Last edited by Lonnie; 04-03-2012 at 10:25 AM.
    This is the worst pain EVER!

  5. #5
    Fuzz is offline What can brown do for u?
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    1,247
    The biggest difference is the removal of the IR filter. A lot of nebulae emit data in the Ha wavelength, which are cut out by the IR filter in standard DSLRs. With the IR filter removed, a lot more of the nebulae data can be captured. Today, many astrophotographers modify their DSLRs manually to remove the filter.

    More details, including comparison here: http://www.astropix.com/HTML/I_ASTROP/DSLR_HA.HTM
    Gallery
    Go that way, really fast...if something gets in your way, TURN!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    in the know
    Posts
    8,339
    Thank you both for the schooling!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •