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Thread: Peroneal nerve?

  1. #1
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    Peroneal nerve?

    What could be irritating my peroneal nerve in the same leg (left) that I tore my MCL? We've ruled out a lumbar problem. Symptoms are tingling on the outside of the leg with it going down into the outside of the foot. Also, there is a snapping near the fib head when I walk.
    It's 5 o'clock somewhere.

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    Sounds like the peroneal nerve may be subluxing(moving in and out of place) from the tunnel that it runs thru as it passes befind the head of the fibula. That could explain the snapping sensation and the neuro symptoms. I am not sure how or why that might be happening or even if it is possible.

    The above is pure speculation as I am not sure an injury like this is even possible. I have never seen this problem in the knee before, but your symptoms sound similar to what throwing athlets experience with a subluxing ulnar nerve.

    Paging Mrs. Roo for neuro consult.........
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  3. #3
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    Sounds unusual. It sounds like a sensory branch as I assume you don't have any weakness (flopping foot when walking).

    Did it happen suddenly or more gradual? Did it happen when you tore your MCL? I have seen symptoms like this with some sort of compression injury but to not have muscle weakness is more unusual. The nerve that hooks around the fibula is a large mixed nerve containing both sensory and motor nerves.

    If it is a neuropraxia (a bruised nerve) it will take some time for the nerves to settle. The tingling will be annoying and just be careful when walking over uneven ground as the altered sensation will affect your balance.

    A dislocation is possible, though I've never encountered that before, and they could probably track the nerves path and movement with ultrasound scanning.

    Sorry I can't be of more help.
    Monty Python's version of the cougar phenomenon:
    "This is a frightened city. Over these houses, over these streets hangs a pall of fear. Fear of a new kind of violence which is terrorizing the city. Yes, gangs of old ladies attacking defenseless, fit young men".

  4. #4
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    Oh, you and Vinman are excellent!

    The snapping started after the MCL tear.

    The peroneal nerve stuff started about 7 weeks post. I had painted my son's room on Tues/Wed and on Friday the tingling started. I was up and down a ladder and kneeling/crawling to paint.

    No flopping foot and muscle weakness.
    It's 5 o'clock somewhere.

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    It is my guess that it was the kneeling and crawling that caused the irritation of the nerve. Not sure why the clicking/snapping sensation is happening. Are you sure it is realted to the numbness and tingling or could it be something else unrelated to the nerve irritation? Other thing that can give you a snapping sensation on the outside of the knee are the IT band, cartilage tears. from yur description a cartialge tear seems unlikely, but occasionally they can accompny an MCL tear. Hopefully it is not this but maybe have you doc take another look.

    Good luck
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vinman
    It is my guess that it was the kneeling and crawling that caused the irritation of the nerve. Not sure why the clicking/snapping sensation is happening. Are you sure it is realted to the numbness and tingling or could it be something else unrelated to the nerve irritation? Other thing that can give you a snapping sensation on the outside of the knee are the IT band, cartilage tears. from yur description a cartialge tear seems unlikely, but occasionally they can accompny an MCL tear. Hopefully it is not this but maybe have you doc take another look.

    Good luck
    IS taht tears in the IT band? or knee cartilage? The MRI I had showed no cartilage tears, if I recall correctly.

    Don't know if they're related at all, but they're definitely in the same area--the tingling starts there and goes down.
    It's 5 o'clock somewhere.

  7. #7
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    The snapping could still be the nerve as subluxing in and out of its groove, but I was just giving a couple other things to look for that can cause a snapping sensation. And in a good percentage of MRI's lateral meniscal tears will not show up, especially if they are small. Again just something to keep in mind, not saying that you definitely have a meniscus tear. Just gogin over the options as it is toucgh to tell without being able to examine you knee.

    The IT band can also be a pretty good imitator of alot of things. And inflammed/tight IT band will snap and cause pain on the lateral part of the knee and if this is the case it might be unrelated to the nerve irritation, but just happens to be on the same knee. It would be easy to inflame and IT band after a knee injury if you were limping on it.
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    Thanks, Vinman. The more I read here, the less confidence I have in the medical profession in my cornfield. I swear we're 15 years behind either of the coasts. I really appreciate the ideas, so I can ask at my next appointment.
    It's 5 o'clock somewhere.

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    Well one thing you don't want to do is go to the doc and say some guy on the internet told me....... Prolly would get laughed at. Just go in armed with some info and have good questions. And don't just take my word for it. It is really tough to nail down some of these injuries without being able to exam it.

    It would pay off to do some research on your own as well. Google IT band, lateral meniscus and peroneal nerve and find out as much as you can. In your own research you might be able to give the doc a better understanding of what is going on becasue you are able to describe it better.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vinman
    Well one thing you don't want to do is go to the doc and say some guy on the internet told me....... Prolly would get laughed at. Just go in armed with some info and have good questions. And don't just take my word for it. It is really tough to nail down some of these injuries without being able to exam it.

    It would pay off to do some research on your own as well. Google IT band, lateral meniscus and peroneal nerve and find out as much as you can. In your own research you might be able to give the doc a better understanding of what is going on becasue you are able to describe it better.
    I read it on the internet, it must be true!! I have a bunch of "imaginary" friends of the internet persuasion. People just don't get it.

    I have done research and taken info into doc before. I think it pisses off my FP, but oh, well

    Thanks again for all your help!
    It's 5 o'clock somewhere.

  11. #11
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    I asked a colleague who HAS come across subluxation of the peroneal nerve. She suggested you get it looked at pretty quickly to prevent any secondary damage from it moving around out of its usual spot (if that is what has happened).

    Good luck!
    Monty Python's version of the cougar phenomenon:
    "This is a frightened city. Over these houses, over these streets hangs a pall of fear. Fear of a new kind of violence which is terrorizing the city. Yes, gangs of old ladies attacking defenseless, fit young men".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Roo
    I asked a colleague who HAS come across subluxation of the peroneal nerve. She suggested you get it looked at pretty quickly to prevent any secondary damage from it moving around out of its usual spot (if that is what has happened).

    Good luck!
    EMG is scheduled for Wednesday morning! Thanks to you, too, Mrs Roo!
    It's 5 o'clock somewhere.

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    I <3 Vinman and Mrs Roo

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Roo
    I asked a colleague who HAS come across subluxation of the peroneal nerve. She suggested you get it looked at pretty quickly to prevent any secondary damage from it moving around out of its usual spot (if that is what has happened).

    Good luck!
    Nerve is OK, numbers were slightly different to the unaffected leg. Dr thinks it's irritated, possibly by the swelling or possibly by moving aroung the fib head--the sublaxing you were talking about. Going to try neurontin to calm it down and let time heal it.

    I'm not the most patient person, though.
    It's 5 o'clock somewhere.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nohillsnearby
    Nerve is OK
    Nice one, mate!
    Monty Python's version of the cougar phenomenon:
    "This is a frightened city. Over these houses, over these streets hangs a pall of fear. Fear of a new kind of violence which is terrorizing the city. Yes, gangs of old ladies attacking defenseless, fit young men".

  15. #15
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    Try this: lay flat on floor, have someone put their foot in your crotch, pull leg to outside, gently twist to outside with slight pull action for a 10 count, then twist to inside for a 10 count. The push in and twist to the side that was least resistant (gently) and hold for a 10 count. Lastly, have that person reach up and grab arm on same side, pull it down toward foot while foot is still out to the side.

    Burn two fatties and let me know if it helped.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by splat
    Try this: lay flat on floor, have someone put their foot in your crotch, pull leg to outside, gently twist to outside with slight pull action for a 10 count, then twist to inside for a 10 count. The push in and twist to the side that was least resistant (gently) and hold for a 10 count. Lastly, have that person reach up and grab arm on same side, pull it down toward foot while foot is still out to the side.

    Burn two fatties and let me know if it helped.

    Are you serious, or just pulling my leg? (Pardon the pun)
    It's 5 o'clock somewhere.

  17. #17
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    How is it going?, NHN?
    Monty Python's version of the cougar phenomenon:
    "This is a frightened city. Over these houses, over these streets hangs a pall of fear. Fear of a new kind of violence which is terrorizing the city. Yes, gangs of old ladies attacking defenseless, fit young men".

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Roo
    How is it going?, NHN?
    The neurontin has helped calm the nerve. It kicks my butt, though. I need to talk to the Dr about a dosage change. Something still isn't right in the leg, though. The past couple of weeks of horseback riding has contained severe muscle cramps in that portion of my calf.

    Thanks for asking, Mrs Roo!
    It's 5 o'clock somewhere.

  19. #19
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    Make sure you keep stretching the calf. Does the calf ever spasm or bounce/tremor in sitting?
    Monty Python's version of the cougar phenomenon:
    "This is a frightened city. Over these houses, over these streets hangs a pall of fear. Fear of a new kind of violence which is terrorizing the city. Yes, gangs of old ladies attacking defenseless, fit young men".

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Roo
    Make sure you keep stretching the calf. Does the calf ever spasm or bounce/tremor in sitting?
    Stretching, on list to do-check. No spasm or bounce.
    It's 5 o'clock somewhere.

  21. #21
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    Skied today, knee did great. We'll see how it is in the morning, but looking good so far!!
    It's 5 o'clock somewhere.

  22. #22
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    Good news indeed!
    Monty Python's version of the cougar phenomenon:
    "This is a frightened city. Over these houses, over these streets hangs a pall of fear. Fear of a new kind of violence which is terrorizing the city. Yes, gangs of old ladies attacking defenseless, fit young men".

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