Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 47

Thread: Best Cookbooks?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Video Bargainville
    Posts
    938

    Best Cookbooks?

    With as much food/cooking talk as there is here, I can't be the only person who digs reading cookbooks...

    Tonight's dinner came mostly from Michael Ruhlman's "Twenty" (specifically, the Butterflied Chicken with Lemon-Tarragon Butter Baste), which was amazing. It made me wonder if there are other cookbooks/authors I should be looking for. He's kind of one of my favorites (my bacon and bratwurst recipes come from Charcuterie). I like the way he approaches cooking in general, trying to make it a very accessible thing, but also emphasizing the importance of cooking and eating good food . "Twenty" has a lot of great recipes, but like most of his stuff, it seems to aim to be a cookbook that teaches you how to cook in the absence of a specific recipe (like his book "Ratio"), instead of just teaching you recipes.

    I have a bazillion cookbooks, but seem that I keep coming back to the same 5 or 6 again and again. Anyone else have favorite/recommended cookbooks?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    6,964
    The only true cookbook I own I've had for over 20 years: The New Professional Chef. I remember getting it as my sole Christmas present from my parents when I was just starting my restaurant career. Over the years, I've stuffed into its pages recipes that I've coaxed of people and restaurants.

    Last year I picked up one book, for the photos mostly, called Street Food Of India that I enjoy, but cookbooks in general are really expensive, and I tend to fly from the hip way too much for them to be of value.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West
    Posts
    66
    The Weber gas grill cookbook. No cleanup required.
    We build statues out of snow, and weep to see them melt...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    they tell me it's paradise
    Posts
    21,392
    The Silver Spoon - Italian Food

    Land of Plenty: A Treasury of Authentic Sichuan Cooking
    Lord King of the Beater-Kooks

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    556
    Either of bittman's "how to cook everything" books as a base...

    From there it depends if you want to use it or have pretty pictures. Bourdain's les halls book strikes a decent balance and is funny.

    The whole beast is a great meat-centric one...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Calgary/Golden
    Posts
    4,740
    I only own four cookbooks. All four are by Jamie Oliver.

    Jamie at Home is by far my favorite. Not just for the recipes, but it's a good read as well.
    It doesn't matter if you're a king or a little street sweeper...
    ...sooner or later you'll dance with the reaper
    -Death

    Kaz is my co-pilot

    www.highwaytechnical.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
    Posts
    6,722
    Mastering the Art of French Cooking
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    700
    Zuni Cafe's cookbook is a classic, better than the actual dining experience they offer, for sure.
    "7 Fires" is pretty cool.
    Keller's books are beautiful, but the food's pretty stuffy for home-cooking.

    Edit: How can we forget the "Joy of Cooking?" Seriously.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    in a van down by the river
    Posts
    2,598
    The "WhiteWater" cook books are good. I also have a few Jamie Oliver books that get some regular use other than that a cheap Thai cook book, the set of "Companies Coming" which are hit and miss and the big win are promotional liquour store magazies, lots of great ideas in 'em.
    I don't work and I don't save, desperate women pay my way.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    426
    America's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    9,028
    Why buy a cook book when you can find 100 different recipes for any type of dish online in a minute? I made Chicken Marsala Saturday for the first time. I found a bunch of different recipes and combined things to make my own. It was awesome.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Baltimore/Seattle
    Posts
    2,489
    Quote Originally Posted by La Vaina Ajena View Post
    The Weber gas grill cookbook. No cleanup required.
    +1. It's called Weber's Big Book of Grilling. So much awesomeness. (And no, it's not just a gas grill cookbook).
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    PopSci Comment Section
    Posts
    29,824
    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    Mastering the Art of French Cooking
    Even better: http://www.amazon.com/Jacques-P%C3%A.../dp/1579121659

    Once you have the basics down the rest is art. It's kinda like learning how to write, but you still need inspiration to produce a novel.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
    Posts
    6,722
    Le Bull Merde! Nobody teaches technique like Julia.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    PopSci Comment Section
    Posts
    29,824
    (psst: Jacques Pepin taught Julia)

    edit: well, not really - just on their show together. His La Technique and La Methode (which are now combined in the single volume I linked above) are pretty much the textbooks of French Cuisine these days since they also have step-by-step pix to help you learn.

    Not taking anything away from Ms. Child, but one is a trained chef, the other a glorified hausfrau.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasatch
    Posts
    2,961
    Quote Originally Posted by Tippster View Post
    Not taking anything away from Ms. Child, but one is a trained chef, the other a glorified hausfrau.
    Jeez, Tipp, glorified hausfrau? She was better than that.

    The Way to Cook is a nice reference and was her best work, in my opinion.


    I always end up using America's Test Kitchen/Cook's Illustrated New Best Recipe cookbook. I really enjoy the geeky approach.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    PopSci Comment Section
    Posts
    29,824
    I know she graduated from Cordon Bleu, but damn I can't get over those dresses and aprons. She was just going with the times I suppose. For me Julia Child was more Pepin's sous-chef on the PBS TV show I grew up with. He cooked, she "helped" (mainly drank the wine.)

    I'm a huge Cooks Illustrated fan. I actually use their magazine, books, and website more than anything else when I need inspiration.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    700
    ^^^ Cook's Illustrated is great, especially around the holidays.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    700


    I like almost everything these guys do.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Seat 2B
    Posts
    2,531
    The Silver Palate Cookbook... can't really go wrong.

    That being said, there are a number of solid "foundational" cookbooks and then things to tag on after that.
    "Vagenius"

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    West Coast of the East Coast
    Posts
    5,506
    Anyone Can Cook- Auguste Gusteau



    Seriously-

    Al Roker's Big Bad Book of BBQ- from when he was still fat.
    http://adaps.smugmug.com/photos/315388427_jdSb8-Th.jpg

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    is Gorges
    Posts
    4,170
    Quote Originally Posted by Tippster View Post


    Not taking anything away from Ms. Child, but one is a trained chef, the other a glorified hausfrau.
    Thats 'top secret reseaher with the OSS' hausfrau to you.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SLC
    Posts
    212
    The Art of Simple Food by Alice Waters.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    crown of the continent
    Posts
    11,996
    Hot and Spicy- Unusual, Innovative Recipes From The World's Fiery Cuisines by Marlena Spieler, not so much for the exact recipes, but for stylistic inspiration, and her stories of the different dishes are pretty cool too.
    Neil Young said Harvest put him right in the middle of the road, so he headed for the nearest ditch. I think we've kind of just gone ditch to ditch to ditch a lot of the time.

    Patterson Hood of the DBT's

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    north by northwest
    Posts
    9,266


    also, if you learned how to make an omelette from that hausfrau mentioned above you'll never, ever go hungry. I make Julia's omelette every saturday morning.


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •