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  1. #1
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    Molding Intuitions with hot water. It works

    So I had seen in one of the other threads guys speculating on using hot water to mold their liners. I thought it sounded like a great idea, as I wasn't sure how well this jong would get a bag of hot rice down into the toes. I bought a large turkey oven bag, stuffed it down into the toe of boot one, boiled a pot of water and slowly filled the boot with boiling water, tapping the toe to make sure the bag expanded in that area. Let the hot water sit in it for 8 minutes, emptied water into sink and pulled out bag, stuffed in foot with padded toe cap and stood there for 10 minutes, as per previous instructions with the 2X4. Once done, filled up boot two with boiling water, same procedure.
    The liners were uncomfortably tight prior to molding and now they are comfortably snug. This turned out to work really easily for me. For the molding pros out there, I would be curious what you think if you ever try this method.

    Quote Originally Posted by leroy jenkins View Post
    I think you'd have an easier time understanding people if you remembered that 80% of them are fucking morons.
    That is why I like dogs, more than most people.

    Quote Originally Posted by telemike View Post
    at this point I don't care about gnar - I care about having teh funz skiing

  2. #2
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    I've got some old liners I might try this with. Clever.
    But Ellen kicks ass - if she had a beard it would be much more haggard. -Jer

  3. #3
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    I'm definitely trying this method for the next liners I mold.

    Question for the chemists: salt water boils at a higher temp, right? Since Intuitions are supposed to be molded in the oven around 220*, and boiling water is 212* (at sea level; I live much higher), wouldn't it be good to get that water hotter than 212* to get a good mold? Therefore... add salt to the water too?
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    I'm definitely trying this method for the next liners I mold.

    Question for the chemists: salt water boils at a higher temp, right? Since Intuitions are supposed to be molded in the oven around 220*, and boiling water is 212* (at sea level; I live much higher), wouldn't it be good to get that water hotter than 212* to get a good mold? Therefore... add salt to the water too?
    Makes sense to me....And yes, salt does make water boil at a higher temp. I'm not sure if it is enough to counteract the altitude....but I don't think it would hurt.

    EDiT:
    So i found a few websites....
    http://van.physics.illinois.edu/qa/listing.php?id=1457
    http://www.csgnetwork.com/h2oboilcalc.html

    it looks like the salt wont do much...I also checked boiling point at 9000 feet. it is about 195. you'd have to add a lot of salt to raise the boiling point up to 220F. About 30g per 0.5 deg C. so to raise it 25F or 12C, you need to add 24*30g = 720g to 1Kg of water...I think. I'm not sure how much that is, but give it a shot and let us know.

  5. #5
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    In Canada, every 30 grams of salt per 1 kg of water increases the boiling point by 0.5d C.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    I'm definitely trying this method for the next liners I mold.

    Question for the chemists: salt water boils at a higher temp, right? Since Intuitions are supposed to be molded in the oven around 220*, and boiling water is 212* (at sea level; I live much higher), wouldn't it be good to get that water hotter than 212* to get a good mold? Therefore... add salt to the water too?
    The oven may be 220, but I doubt the liners ever get to that temp, because if they did there's a good chance of burning your feet. Water holds a lot more heat energy and transfers it more quickly than air so water at 212 will likely get the liners just as warm if not warmer than 220 air. I've heard of this method being used for skates that have a moldable plastic in the cuff.

    Unless you're at Everest Base camp, I wouldn't worry too much about the temp of the boiling water.

  7. #7
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    OK. I'll just try tap water, no added salt.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  8. #8
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    Did the outside of the liners mold to conform with the contours of the shell?

  9. #9
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    I have a new pair of Intuition Plug Wraps for my Factors. I was going to have a shop do them, but then I read this thread. What about using Antifreeze? You should be able to heat it to a higher temperature than water.. A thermometer might be needed so you do not over heat the liquid.

    Like pisteoff, I am curious as to whether the liners conform to the shells

  10. #10
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    If anyone tries antifreeze, make sure the plastic bag does not melt or stretch to failure before pouring this in your new liners.

  11. #11
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    Not what I had pictured when I read the title of this thread!!

    I would tend to think that the outer aspect of the liners do not even get close to the recommended temp. I think this is really more of a 1/2 baked method.

    I personally didn't have any troubles with the kitchen oven...and will probably stick to that.

  12. #12
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    A+.

    turkey bag was a nice touch in the heat vs. plastic battle.
    No, the real point is, I don't give a damn
    - Carl

  13. #13
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    I used this exact method and mention it in the intuition thread. I was molding a set of liners that had previously been baked at a shop so the exterior side of the liner was already molded to the shell. This method is very easy and worked as good as any other method for molding the inside of the lines. I have never tried this method with a new liner so I cannot comment on how it would work to mold to the shell.

  14. #14
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    I think this is really more of a 1/2 baked method.
    Dude, nobody wants to get just half baked...

    On a serious note, I too have used the oven method with great success many times.
    Mount your own skis and bake your own liners!

  15. #15
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    I've done oven and rice bag methods. I'd definitely try this one over the rice bag next time. I suspect this, like the rice bag method is best for stock liners that have already been heat fitted once to the boot and a standard last at the factory. It'd be nice if Intuition told you the actual temp of the liner, not the oven needed for good molding. I'd guess it's about 140 deg F at most and might be even lower. My googlefu was weak and I didn't find any hints as to the actual softening temp of the liner.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jethro View Post
    If anyone tries antifreeze, make sure the plastic bag does not melt or stretch to failure before pouring this in your new liners.
    Cooking oil would be a lot safer if you want a liquid hotter than 212 deg F, but I really don't think a hotter liquid is going to help all that much. Water has a very high specific heat.

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...ermo/spht.html

    I'd guess there's more than enough energy to heat the liner in a pot of boiling water.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    In Canada, every 30 grams of salt per 1 kg of water increases the boiling point by 0.5d C.
    Only in Canada?

  18. #18
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    I had a pressure point on top of my foot I needed to deal with and used a collapsible water bottle with boiling water (7600 ft elev), coupled with socks to insulate areas I did not want to change. It worked great.

    Thanks for the heads up on this liv2ski.
    Last edited by Alpinord; 02-05-2012 at 09:50 AM.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by pisteoff View Post
    Did the outside of the liners mold to conform with the contours of the shell?
    Pisteoff, sorry I missed this question until now. I pulled the liners out and to my inexperienced eyes, I didn't notice any obvious signs of being molded to the shell except in the heel/ankle area. The heel is snug as a fuckin bug, yet you may notice that the ankle area expanded to fill in the shell. After skiing them 5 days in Utah last week, I am very satisfied with the results. They kick the shit out of the stock liners combined with pricey foot beds. Sorry for the shitty cell phone pic.

    Quote Originally Posted by leroy jenkins View Post
    I think you'd have an easier time understanding people if you remembered that 80% of them are fucking morons.
    That is why I like dogs, more than most people.

    Quote Originally Posted by telemike View Post
    at this point I don't care about gnar - I care about having teh funz skiing

  20. #20
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    Just did mine by the oven method and really happy but didn't make my toecap big enough and wound up with a hammertoe on my first tour yesterday. I think this is going to be the perfect fix to make a minor tweak without redoing the whole thing in the oven.

  21. #21
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    I just molded my liners in my Factor shells using the boiling water method. I have to say, I was not really impressed. It just did not seem to really conform the liners to my feet or the shells. The big punches like the ankle bones were apparent, but the rest of my feet contours were less defined. Part of the problem might be that I used the thinner Plug Wrap liner. There is a chance the shell was too loose to really compress the liners. I redid the liners in the oven and had better results. I am still not really happy since the liners are not snug in the upper cuff unless I crank the buckles as hard as they go. I might get the thicker 12mm liners, and If I do, I will be using the oven method.

    In addition, disregard my previous posts about possibly using a higher boiling point liquid. Really stupid and potentially messy idea.

  22. #22
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    Sugar will increase the boiling temp of water much more effectively than salt.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbense View Post
    Cooking oil would be a lot safer if you want a liquid hotter than 212 deg F, but I really don't think a hotter liquid is going to help all that much. Water has a very high specific heat.

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...ermo/spht.html

    I'd guess there's more than enough energy to heat the liner in a pot of boiling water.
    All that energy in the boiling water is useless if it can't get the boots to their softening temp. I am not saying it doesn't get it hot enough either. Does anyone know the actual melting/softening point of the liners, and not just a recommended oven temp?

  24. #24
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    I would think a vapor barrier sock would make a better fitting water container

    Hayduke Aug 7,1996 GS-Aug 26 2010

  25. #25
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    Probably a stupid question, but I've never used a Turkey oven bag before as I prefer my turkeys FRIED:

    The boiling water will not melt the bag, but it will soften the foam?

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