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  1. #1
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    How do you get a dog to wear booties?

    The first attempt at getting some dog boots on our border collie was stressful for him and a crack up at the same time. He cannot stand the snow and ice between his toes and I thought the boots would be worth a shot so he can have more comfort while we're out touring. Any ideas on how to encourage a dog to wear these stylish boots?

    How long will they actually stay on?
    Last edited by Alpinord; 12-22-2009 at 10:17 AM.

  2. #2
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    Skip the booties and spray the paws with Pam before you go out. It works great. Snow won't stick in the paws.

  3. #3
    lhowemt is offline gaper-'airin out my teeth
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    Lots of treats works well, distraction and positive reinforcement are key.

    But, as the above poster said, there are ways to keep the snowballs down. We have goldens who get bad paw snowballs. I trim the fur within their paws, then liberally apply "unpetroleum" jelly to the same area. Works great, OK to eat. Thicker than pam and stays on better for those really snow-bally paws.

  4. #4
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    this is an honest question: how do coyotes and wolves manage with this problem?

  5. #5
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    Put them on him around the house and don't let him take them off- he'll get used to them pretty quickly.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by YetiMan View Post
    this is an honest question: how do coyotes and wolves manage with this problem?
    Our malamute/golden, akida/shepard/chow and golden lab never had this issue like our border collie does. Could be the hair and needed trim. This will be interesting. He hates it when we cut his rasta whithers.

    He'll lick the Pam off but I'll keep trying. 'Unpetroleum' jelly, eh? How about cooking oil?

    Thanks for the input. This process would make a funny video.

  7. #7
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    Threats of neutering.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by YetiMan View Post
    this is an honest question: how do coyotes and wolves manage with this problem?
    wild critters have different fur than sheep dogs

    shockingly and horribly so, the Athabaskans and Inuit prefer the fur of the humble and inoffensive wolverine to make ruffs for their parkas because it doesn't build up ice from their foul and mean-spirited human breaths

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by alewi11 View Post
    Skip the booties and spray the paws with Pam before you go out. It works great. Snow won't stick in the paws.
    yeah we did this with an Australian Shepard and it worked well ,DON'T leave the can of pam in the car to freeze cuz frozen pam doesnt spray

  10. #10
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    Athletic tape around the top of them is key. We have two Aussies and that was the only thing that kept them on. But you get the cheap felt type booties that the dog sled teams use and you're golden.

    btw - Pam doesn't work.

  11. #11
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    This dog truly sounds meant for his environs.

    I asked this guy once in an eddy how to get better at kayak spins, he says "do it a thousand times more, you'll get good.

    Your dog's a puss.
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    "Pffffft, Please."
    Never, EVER, give them permission to enter your vehicle, the dogs are not coming.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by highangle View Post
    wild critters have different fur than sheep dogs
    ...snip...
    Even different kinds of dogs have different fur. Snow doesn't stick to the fur of my Norwegian Elkhound at all. He has pretty thick fur between the pads of his paws and snow doesn't ball up or cause him any problems. Elkhounds, Huskies, Mals, Akitas, and other "Northern" or "Spitz" breeds have fur much more like what a wolf or coyote would have than retrievers, shepherds, etc.

    As for getting the booties on him, you need to work more at handling your dog. Any dog I've ever owned will let me handle him in any way I want. I can pick him up and hold him upside down, put him around my neck like a shawl, carefully inspect his paws, trim his nails, etc. etc. and he won't struggle. It takes a little bit of work to get them to that point, but it's part of being the leader in your relationship with your dog and developing a bond of trust. It's how you get a dog to let you do this to him without a struggle:

    http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n...ridgelower.jpg
    ...Some will fall in love with life and drink it from a fountain that is pouring like an avalanche coming down the mountain...

    "I enjoy skinny skiing, bullfights on acid..." - Lacy Underalls

    The problems we face will not be solved by the minds that created them.

  13. #13
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    Ive never had this issue with my dog (german shappard/rottie X). How ever it is a good idea to have somthing to protect the paws on the long tours.

    My dog dosent mine my putting anything on his paws and is alright with it. Im more worried about the booties falling off.

  14. #14
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    my dog is 12 and the cold, snow and salt bother his feet so he wears boots. and he looks damned cute in them. they will fall off in the crusty snow though, but i dont walk him through that anyway. he hates them, but has resigned himself to weat them when its really cold out. it took some getting used to. he still walks funny til he gets outside.
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    I could go on, and on, and on...but who cares

  15. #15
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    We use the booties occasionally on a sheepdog/poodle mix (dingleberry magnet). She will try to pull them off unless we put them on, and get her moving, fast. Once she's out rampaging in the snow she doesn't seem to mind them.

    Some friends just told me about something called "musher's balm" (or something like that) that they use on their dogs' feet, and said it works well. I have to look into that.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  16. #16
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    ^^^ We used Mushers Balm once, it works for a little while then seems to wear out. Our Setter hates her booties at first every time we put them on, she stands there like she is frozen. We always put them on once in the beginning of the year while we are inside, she is usually fine after that. Once the dog is outside and playing the boots shouldn't be a problem anymore.

  17. #17
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    we used cheese. that and put them on right before we hit he snow. that way the excitement nullifies the suck of the booties.

  18. #18
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    Thanks for all the ideas. This guy is anything but a pussy and absolutely loves going skiing (or anything):





    but does get bummed when ice and snow grind between his toes or collects on his fur. Dryer, lighter snow types seem to be more of an issue than wetter and spring snows.



    I have been wondering about keeping the booties on to stay. They look like they could come off easily. The ones we got are the Granite Gear Mush and Endurance booties.

  19. #19
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    Mushers secret

    Mushers secret works really well; http://www.musherssecret.net/. I have used it a lot, it's what the alaska sled dogs use.

    Mary Jane Hottie is a retard, what a disgrace to kayakers.

  20. #20
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    +1 on mushers secret. shop for the best deal or search tgr, there was a post last week that had a couple links to a good deal for it.

  21. #21
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    The Musher's Secret sounds like a good option, right up my alley and much easier to apply than the booties. These recommendations reminded me to contact a musher friend and see what he says. (Also, looks like a good product to consider for our store, versus booties.)

    Love this quote from their site FAQ's:

    What happens if my dog eats Musher's Secret?

    Other than a mild laxative effect,
    Mushers will not harm you pet if he eats it.

    One customer called to say her dog had eaten
    an entire 200 gram jar and other than
    "pooping candles" the next day, had no
    ill effects.
    With or without a wick?

    Thanks and Happy Holidays with new snow!

  22. #22
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    I also trim the dogs paws in between the pads. Helps a lot.
    Is there nothing sacred? Have we lost our moral center? It just makes me want to pee on someone.
    -Tracy Jordan

  23. #23
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    And if you go the bootie way,remeber not to point and laugh at the dog...


    Friends first sheepie was utterly traumatized by a bunch of people freaking out and laughing uncontrollably with her first time out with the boots. She was scared,walked like she would be tazered and looked miserable..
    Even today,10 years later she tries to shred or hide her boots whenever she finds them.

    The second pup went way better:small treat,put the boots on nonchalantly and quickly and pay no attention to the whole sitation. Voila.She wont even notice them.

    Its only not what you do,its how you do it as well.

    The floggings will continue until morale improves.

  24. #24
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    ruff wear better than granite gear. had those and they feel off all the time. ruff wear stay on better.
    I could go on, and on, and on...but who cares

  25. #25
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    My border collie is kinda a sissy too.

    The first suggestion is to get good booties... and by good I mean simple.
    Throw out the ruffwear and muttlucks and the other things that are awkward for them.
    Pick up booties from www.dogbooties.com. Get the ones with the "Velstretch" fastener. Never look back. Jake was running through 5"s with a little crust on top playing frisbee and they stayed on great. We've run for over an hour on trails and they're all there when we're done. Personally I use the 330cordura for general use and the fleece for when we're walking and its -15.

    The second suggestion is to put them on the dog and start playing with him. Don't do it at home on the floor, don't make a spectacle of him and "how cute he looks". Dogs get embarrassed, especially those as in-tune with humans as border collies.

    Third suggestion....
    well there is no third suggestion. The first two are all you need.

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