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View Full Version : Truck Mags - How much weight to add for winter driving??



DougW
11-09-2006, 01:47 PM
Have a Chev 1500 extended cab with long box so really light in back end. I was thinking of in 200lbs area. Enough?

Was thinking of trying to use AT tires through winter. Bad idea? Only going to keep truch another 1-2 years as its a 92. If really bad won't use it.

Free Range Lobster
11-09-2006, 01:59 PM
Learn to drive first?

Sinecure
11-09-2006, 02:02 PM
Do they sell those tubes of sand up there? We used to get them in NH. They're great for putting over the wheel wells in a car trunk or pickup bed. They serve both to provide some weight over the drive axle, plus they come in very handy if you do get stuck. The other thing I've used was a big box of welding electrodes - but that's b/c I got those free since I worked for a welding supply company. Electrodes give awesome traction too if stuck.

lemon boy
11-09-2006, 02:08 PM
Is it 2wd or 4wd?

4wd = don't bother
2wd = no amount of weight will make it good but after some experimentation I think you'll find more than 200 (like 400+) is better.

Chains, chains are good to have for 2wd trucks.

I have a shell + heavy (~350#) benches in mine and it sucks balls in 2wd.

bc
11-09-2006, 02:11 PM
^^^^ what he said. 200 is kinda light. And sand does come in handy for getting unstuck.

MrDirt
11-09-2006, 02:21 PM
Is it 2wd or 4wd?

4wd = don't bother
2wd = no amount of weight will make it good but after some experimentation I think you'll find more than 200 (like 400+) is better.

Chains, chains are good to have for 2wd trucks.

I have a shell + heavy (~350#) benches in mine and it sucks balls in 2wd.
I have to disagree. 4wd isnt worth crap with an open differential. If your truck has a limited slip or locking diff, dont bother with the sand. Otherwise, treat it as though it was 2wd.

matt
11-09-2006, 02:32 PM
I have to disagree. 4wd isnt worth crap with an open differential. If your truck has a limited slip or locking diff, dont bother with the sand. Otherwise, treat it as though it was 2wd.

You have obviously never driven on the road with a locker.

Locker + snowy road = death

now limited slip is different.

Fatty
11-09-2006, 03:05 PM
Just throw this chick in the back and you should be fine

http://www.tooshocking.com/content/icons/icon_a9d01a163a7c267a793d65ed52f39c5b.jpg

DougW
11-09-2006, 03:11 PM
Is it 2wd or 4wd?

4wd = don't bother
2wd = no amount of weight will make it good but after some experimentation I think you'll find more than 200 (like 400+) is better.

Chains, chains are good to have for 2wd trucks.

I have a shell + heavy (~350#) benches in mine and it sucks balls in 2wd.

its 2wd, next truck will 4wd. Have to check if chains we have will fit tires. HAve shell too but didn't use it much at all last winter as couldn't make it up grade of snow covered driveway.

Going out this weekend should be fine as have lots of rebar in back. For return trip was going to load up with bags of cement. 4 bags should do it.

bc
11-09-2006, 03:13 PM
^ careful with the cement. Once they become solid they can do wonders to your cab if you stop suddenly. Personal experience.

DougW
11-09-2006, 03:20 PM
Hope not solid as I have more concrete to pour in the spring. Going to Wrap in HD garbage bags to keep out moisture.

birdman829
11-09-2006, 05:05 PM
Hes talking about sliding, not getting them wet. Make sure you do something to keep them from sliding. Some trucks have slots built in to the side of the bed that fit a 2x8 or something to keep the bags between the wheel wells and the tailgate.

Hutch
11-09-2006, 05:18 PM
Just throw this chick in the back and you should be fine

http://www.tooshocking.com/content/icons/icon_a9d01a163a7c267a793d65ed52f39c5b.jpg

Beginning to sense a theme here, Fatty.

PlayHarder
11-09-2006, 05:18 PM
[QUOTE=DougW;983077]its 2wd, next truck will 4wd. Have to check if chains we have will fit tires. QUOTE]

Doug, my old truck was 2wd. It never failed to get me anywhere, including around 200K kms of service work up north w/o chains.
Get 4 or 500 #'s of sand in the back and you should be fine for trips between here and Golden.

Just leave your Bobcat at the end of your road.

dk_alaskan
11-09-2006, 05:36 PM
first, get your tires sipped (cheap alternative to studs). second, instead of cement, get bags of p gravel, you can use this for traction AND extra weight. you can also use steel/iron plates, place the weight directly over your tires (between the wheel wells). and it should help. don't need 500 lbs of weight, probably half of that. if you get chains and they are the heavy duty ones, put these in between the wheel wells too

MrDirt
11-09-2006, 05:40 PM
You have obviously never driven on the road with a locker.

Locker + snowy road = death

now limited slip is different.
Sorry, I should have been more clear. By locking I meant electronically locking as available with some off road packages. I'd be scared to death to drive a car with a fully locked diff on the streets.

bio-smear
11-09-2006, 06:00 PM
I have a shell + heavy (~350#) benches in mine and it sucks balls in 2wd.
I have a shell too plus my sleeping deck and some tools/comealong/chains. I was surprised just how bad it hooks up in snow in 2wd, with the limited slip diff. It is pitiful. In 4wd though it rails.

Rideski
11-09-2006, 06:11 PM
So what about the projectile aspect. Is seem like it is an issue whether it is sand, cement, benches, ski boots, tools, jacks, kegs, fat chics, or coolers full of beer. If there is a front end collision, isn't that going to take your head off if not secured down?

dk_alaskan
11-09-2006, 06:24 PM
get a good stick rubber mat and spray in bed liner, it takes a LOT of force to get anything to move with this set up

Rideski
11-09-2006, 06:59 PM
How much force would there be hitting a suddenly spun out Ford Mustang at 35mph if your vehicle weighed 2,300lbs and the Mustang weighed 1,500lbs and was moving at a relative speed of 10mph?

(This is all hypothetical, and slightly tongue in check, but still a feasible example)

dk_alaskan
11-09-2006, 07:05 PM
its a Ford, i wouldnt worry about it, just another ford off the road...if items are heavy and resting on bottom of your bed, it should move forward not up. with my bedlner and rubber mat in the truck, almost nothing moves no matter how fast i have to brake. Haven't hit anything yet with the trucks i have had sprayed-in bed liners installed, so can't comment on the impact....

splat
11-09-2006, 07:28 PM
One bed sized sheet of 12mm diamond plate steel. Dual purpose.

Snow Dog
11-09-2006, 07:50 PM
I use 6x50lb bags of sand + a canopy (100 lbs) in my 4WD 1/2T. It seems to be enough. I've only needed chains when offroad full of deer and hauling a trailer.

XtrPickels
11-09-2006, 08:00 PM
you could frame up something that looks like an H that would fit around the wheel wells. There's 10lbs of lumber and 10 minutes of your time to keep things in the right place

Rideski
11-09-2006, 08:13 PM
you could frame up something that looks like an H that would fit around the wheel wells. There's 10lbs of lumber and 10 minutes of your time to keep things in the right place

I did when I had a truck, most people don't.

--








When the front end of a vehicle plows into something; it usually dives causing the nose to be lower. Therefore if an object keeps moving while the truck is stopped, it is now at head level.

sanjuanworm
11-09-2006, 08:17 PM
99 F250...........
(10) 70# tubes of sand above rear axle........
2wd-- gets around fine..
4wd high--no problems..
4wd low-- will climb a tree..

cooper discoverer s/t with extra sipes

G
11-09-2006, 08:27 PM
A couple hudred pounds oughta be okay.

When you do place weights in the truckbed, put them OVER the axle.
Do NOT put it all the way in the back.

lemon boy
11-10-2006, 08:04 AM
MrDirt-

No offense but...you have no idea what you're talking about.

L/S or locking diffs are indeed superior for getting underway in those horrifyingly annoying situations where one tire is on ice and the other on dry and still you're "stuck" otherwise they're inferior or at best equal*, what you really wanted to say was if you have an open transfer case. Provided the t-case isn't open (and I can't even think of a vehicle off the top of my head that has one...maybe early grand cherokees? or possibly some other "full time" 4wds?) power will be going to at least one front and one rear wheel a situation which in no rational world could be compared to "2wd." This is also just for traditional "dumb" systems not talking traction control ones here.

You are better off if you have a 4wd vehicle with lockable diffs leaving them open for snowy road driving. Lockers are for stuck and wheeling IMVHO.

Doug- you can buy chains to fit any size tire. Get good ones. The 2x4 H is a good idea for sure.

rideski - stuff that heavy and dense shouldn't become a projectile. That said, the projectile aspect is why they make "headache racks" which are those big metal screens that cover the rear windows.

*IMO even a L/S will suffer from the same basic problems as a locker in slick conditions but that's me, I wouldn't mind having a l/s rear much either though.

matt
11-10-2006, 08:40 AM
*IMO even a L/S will suffer from the same basic problems as a locker in slick conditions but that's me, I wouldn't mind having a l/s rear much either though.

I have a LS in my 250 and I dont notice it at all in the snow, but with a diesel and all the weight up front you basically drive in front wheel drive. I personally have never been in a vehicle the is better in the snow than my 250 diesel w/nittos.

Now my jeep with full time lockers front and rear could be out performed on a snowy road by a vette

DougW
11-12-2006, 10:05 AM
Put in 4 - 90lbs cement bags plus cement mixer drum ( ~60lbs) and still felt a bit light on the way . As its a long box even less weight over rear axial than standard so I think going to need more weight than you guys as I assume you have standard boxes..

Intend on building frame and throwing in tires with rims from car weight and see how that goes.

One thing after thinking about it that doesn't make sence. If the weight is farther back than the axials won't that add more weight to the rear axials? By taking some weight off the front. Lets say you put 500lbs 2 feet back of the rear axial, and there is 10 feet between the axials. Won't the increased weight on the rear axail be 600lbs?

arem86
11-12-2006, 11:22 AM
I've got a '91 Toyota 4WD, and that thing slides like a bitch...very light in the tail, I'm planning on putting bags of Pea Gravel in the bed, and I've been told to put it as far back as possible, becasue like Doug said, by doing that you create something of a seesaw effect, taking more weight off the front end. Yes? No?

Snow Dog
11-12-2006, 01:13 PM
One thing after thinking about it that doesn't make sence. If the weight is farther back than the axials won't that add more weight to the rear axials? By taking some weight off the front. Lets say you put 500lbs 2 feet back of the rear axial, and there is 10 feet between the axials. Won't the increased weight on the rear axail be 600lbs?That's just first year engineering. And you're unloading the front axle by 100 pounds. A trailer does an even better job since the ball is further back.

DougW
11-13-2006, 08:54 AM
That's just first year engineering.

Probably high school physics.

If you had a beam attached to the truck bed of infinite stiffness and no mass, who long would it have to be to be able to sit on it and lift up the front wheels.

Brock Landers
11-13-2006, 08:57 AM
I've got a '91 Toyota 4WD, and that thing slides like a bitch...very light in the tail, I'm planning on putting bags of Pea Gravel in the bed, and I've been told to put it as far back as possible, becasue like Doug said, by doing that you create something of a seesaw effect, taking more weight off the front end. Yes? No?


It does ease up the front a bit, but the engine is still pretty heavy and the seesaw effect up front is pretty minimal. I mean, the front isnt getting any lighter. Moving the weight further back though does help in the back, and every little bit helps.

lemon boy
11-13-2006, 09:02 AM
IMO the conventional wisdom regarding weight over the axle instead of all the way to the rear has more to do with lateral balance than fore aft. EG: putting all that weight aft of the axle makes the rear end whippy in corners

frorider
11-13-2006, 09:22 AM
IMO the conventional wisdom regarding weight over the axle instead of all the way to the rear has more to do with lateral balance than fore aft. EG: putting all that weight aft of the axle makes the rear end whippy in corners

exactly. that's why many race cars are mid-engined.

Snow Dog
11-13-2006, 09:32 AM
Probably high school physics.

If you had a beam attached to the truck bed of infinite stiffness and no mass, who long would it have to be to be able to sit on it and lift up the front wheels.Since I happen to know that my front axle is carrying 1,400kg, with my scrawny ass the truck bed would need to extend 200' past the rear axle. If my much larger brother helped it would be 82'4". (Note the mixed use of metric and Imperial units. Welcome to Canada.)

Spats
11-13-2006, 10:16 AM
Put on the shell...the fiberglass ones weigh a LOT. Then you can start thinking about sand and other crap.

DougW
11-13-2006, 12:27 PM
Put on the shell...the fiberglass ones weigh a LOT. Then you can start thinking about sand and other crap.

Got a shell. On to the crap.

powder4breakfast
11-13-2006, 04:21 PM
200lbs is the same as having one guy sit in the bed of your truck. Thats not alot of weight gain compared to the weight of your vehicle - unless that guy was jumping up and down. You need more weight. Home depots and other stores like that sell bags of sand out front for around $2 a bag. And as stated, can be cut open and used for traction when needed. I used to put about 5 bags in my wife's Tacoma when she was cruising up LCC everyday.

DougW
11-13-2006, 04:56 PM
I don't know why I wrote 200lbs as I was thinking of 4 bags of cement at 40kg each which is a total of 352lbs. Around here sand bags are $4 for 18kg so about the same as I paid for my cement.